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'Model' NATO Summit – Julie Lydon OBE and Dame Rosemary Butler AM
The University of South Wales hosted a 'model' NATO summit attended by Sixth-Form students from Wales and England at its Newport City Campus on 5-6th Septemb…

By: University of South Wales

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‘Model’ NATO Summit – Julie Lydon OBE and Dame Rosemary Butler AM – Video

Why the visit?

CU Law School students visit Colorado schools every year about this time in celebration of Constitution Day, which is Sept. 17.

During the visits, CU law students discuss case law and discuss a hypothetical case.

Greeley Central High School social studies teacher Alan Stearns gave a fist pump shortly after 10 a.m. Friday.

His freshman social studies class had just wrapped up a lesson on the First Amendment from guest lecturers Annie Finch and Bob Miller.

Finch, a second-year law student at University of Colorado, Boulder, had previously presented to classes at Abraham Lincoln High School in Denver and York International Academy in Thornton as part of a two-week-long celebration of Constitution Day, which is Sept. 17.

So, was Greeley Central the best?

Obviously, yes, Finch grinned, looking at Stearns.

Bam! Fist pump.

I was incredibly proud of my students, Stearns said.

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Greeley Central High students discuss First Amendment with CU law student, lawyer



University of South Wales hosts model NATO summit
The University of South Wales hosted a 'model' NATO summit attended by Sixth-Form students from Wales and England at its Newport City Campus on 5-6th September 2014. The conference saw…

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University of South Wales hosts model NATO summit – Video



(FULL VERSION) NSA Attacks Student at University of New Mexico
(FULL VERSION) NSA Attacks Student at University of New Mexico Angle Two NSA Recruiter Assaults Student for Asking Questions About Data Collection September …

By: steven O`man

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(FULL VERSION) NSA Attacks Student at University of New Mexico – Video

Texas has long prided itself on its Open Beaches Act, which guarantees public access to beaches along most of the states 367-mile Gulf Coast.

But public beach advocates say a recent Texas Supreme Court decision which is supported by the front-runner in the race to be the state’s next land commissioner and a growing property rights movement could endanger that guarantee. They fear that as beaches face impacts from coastal erosion, rising sea levels and the threat of powerful storms, private property rights could take precedence over access to public beach access.

We have two rock-solid principles: public access to public beaches, and the right of private owners to exclude others from the property which is theirs, said David Abraham, a law professor at the University of Miami. Theyre always in tension, but if we face issues like sea-level rise and increasingly severe storms, theres going to be less stability in that balance.

For decades, the Open Beaches Act which was voted into the Texas Constitution in 2009 was a signal to coastline property owners that if erosion or a storm wiped out the public beach behind them, their homes could become state property. In the past several years, the General Land Office, the state agency that deals with coastal issues, has taken 18 properties for such reasons, reimbursing owners $50,000 each.

After Hurricane Rita hit Texas in 2005, Carol Severance sued the state after it said her Galveston property was now in the public domain. In 2010, the Texas Supreme Court ruled in her favor, saying the property remained private because the beach had been wiped out through an avulsive event, like a big storm rather than imperceptible coastal erosion.

Public beach advocates say the decision went too far. Rob Nixon, chairman of the Surfrider Foundations South Texas chapter, said it sets up unrestricted development of the coast, which is going to ultimately put the Texas taxpayer and public on the dime for bailing all these people out.

But many private property rights advocates hailed the ruling. Among the supporters is George P. Bush, a Republican widely expected to win the November election to head the General Land Office.

I dont believe that the state should take land in the event of storms, Bush said recently during an event hosted by The Texas Tribune. He added that landowners whose property has been taken were not compensated enough, and that there are many other places along the coast that the public can access without threatening private property interests.

The current land commissioner, Jerry Patterson, who was named in the Severance lawsuit, has excoriated the Severance ruling as weakening public access in a Californication of Texas beaches. As a result of the decision, the General Land Office canceled a $40 million beach nourishment project in Galveston for fear of illegally spending public money on private land.

Patterson said he feared more similar projects would have to be abandoned.

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Debating What's More Sacred: Private Land or Public Beaches

By DAVID J. SKORTON

In the first month of the fall semester, we have seen a growing activist spirit on many campuses, including our own, prompted by a wide array of local, national and international issues. Our Universitys financial contributions to the surrounding community, racial profiling and the militarization of police forces in the wake of events in Ferguson, Missouri, as well as escalating tensions in the Middle East are among the concerns that have prompted action by members of our campus community. One of the overriding issues of concern is the limits of free speech and the relationship between free speech and civility.

With very few exceptions, rallies, protests and other public events, as well as individual speech and writing intended to highlight the concerns mentioned above and others, are important, desired and expected features of our campus climate, and I commend everyone involved for allowing us to learn from each other while confronting important and difficult issues. But what of civility?

Civility is an important value in a university community and a community at large and one that we at Cornell must strive to maintain. However, as events on other campuses last spring and again this fall have shown, calls for civility in dealing with highly charged issues can be perceived as veiled assaults on free speech, which is also an essential university value and one deeply tied to academic freedom. Are these cherished principles of civility and free speech potentially antithetical? How can we reconcile them? Is there a bright line we must not cross?

It has been a fundamental precept of American law, reinforced by U.S. Supreme Court decisions, that odious, offensive or hateful speech is nonetheless protected speech. For this reason, hate speech codes at public universities that prohibited and punished persons for offensive speech that stigmatizes persons as a group on the basis of their race, national origin, sex or sexual orientation have been struck down as unconstitutional.

By contrast, disciplinary codes that focus narrowly on behavior or conduct that is threatening or harassing to individuals such as our own Campus Code of Conduct are consistent with First Amendment principles, and prudent to have as a policy matter.

As our Campus Code notes, In a university community, as in society as a whole, freedom of speech cannot be absolute. Speech that is libelous, or that incites a crowd to riot, deserves no protection. Perhaps no one, in real life, has ever falsely shouted Fire! in a crowded theater, but surely no one has a right to do so. Within such commonly accepted limits, however, freedom of speech should be the paramount value in a university community. Because it is a special kind of community, whose purpose is the discovery of truth through the practice of free inquiry, a university has an essential dependence on a commitment to the values of unintimidated speech. To curb speech on the grounds that an invited speaker is noxious, that a cause is evil, or that such ideas will offend some listeners is therefore inconsistent with a universitys purpose. [Article III A 2]

The Campus Code similarly recognizes that reasonable time, place and manner restrictions are appropriate to balance the right of free speech with other protected interests [Article III B 1]. Thistopic, controversial to some on campus, presently is the subject of discussion and review by the University Assembly.

Those who object to a speaker, as the Campus Code explains, also have rights to make their own position known by a variety of methods as long as they do not interfere with the speakers right to be heard or the right of others to listen. And, of course, they are free to organize their own events to offer alternate points of view.

In the interest of providing for the safety of all in our community, we cannot and must not tolerate speech that is harassing or threatening to individuals or that incites others to commit violent acts. As long as that line is not crossed, however, we must let free speech happen and, in fact, foster it. The antidote to odious, offensive or hateful speech must be more speech, not less speech. It remains the place of the University to encourage open and free expression, even about topics that generate strong feelings and even when the views being expressed may be seen by some as upsetting or offensive.

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SKORTON | Civility and Free Speech: Are They Incompatible?



NSA Attacks Student at University of New Mexico (Angle One)
More information and additional video here: http://importantcool.com/confronting-the-nsa-on-camera/

By: Andy Beale

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NSA Attacks Student at University of New Mexico (Angle One) – Video

Published September 26, 2014

U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, speaks at the fourth annual Texas Tribune Festival held at the University of Texas at Austin in Austin, Texas, on Saturday, Sept. 20, 2014. (AP Photo/Austin American-Statesman, Rodolfo Gonzalez)(The Associated Press)

Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) speaks at the California GOP convention on Saturday, Sept. 20, 2014, in Los Angeles. Paul has sought a broader audience this year as he has aggressively traveled the country ahead of a potential presidential bid in 2016. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)(The Associated Press)

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky. speaks at the 2014 Values Voter Summit in Washington, Friday, Sept. 26, 2014. Prospective Republican presidential candidates are expected to promote religious liberty at home and abroad at a gathering of evangelical conservatives, rebuking an unpopular President Barack Obama while skirting divisive social issues that have tripped up the GOP. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)(The Associated Press)

Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas speaks at the 2014 Values Voter Summit in Washington, Friday, Sept. 26, 2014. Prospective Republican presidential candidates are expected to promote religious liberty at home and abroad at a gathering of evangelical conservatives, rebuking an unpopular President Barack Obama while skirting divisive social issues that have tripped up the GOP. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)(The Associated Press)

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky. speaks at the 2014 Values Voter Summit in Washington, Friday, Sept. 26, 2014. Prospective Republican presidential candidates are expected to promote religious liberty at home and abroad at a gathering of evangelical conservatives, rebuking an unpopular President Barack Obama while skirting divisive social issues that have tripped up the GOP. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)(The Associated Press)

WASHINGTON Prospective Republican presidential candidates are expected to promote “religious liberty” at home and abroad at a gathering of religious conservatives, rebuking an unpopular President Barack Obama while skirting divisive social issues that have tripped up the GOP.

The annual Voters Value Summit opens Friday in Washington with speeches from several potential presidential candidates, including Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee and Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal. The speaking program features ambitious Republicans with positions on social issues across the spectrum from the libertarian-leaning Paul, who favors less emphasis on abortion and gay marriage, to Huckabee, a former Southern Baptist pastor whose conservative social values define his brand.

But evangelical organizers of the event largely expect participants to unite around what they call Obama’s attack on religious liberty, according to Tony Perkins, president of the host organization, the Family Research Council. Perkins cited an Obama administration rule that compels health insurers to cover female contraception in addition to a foreign policy he says doesn’t do enough to protect Christian values around the world.

“Without religious freedom we lose the ability to even address those other issues,” Perkins said of social issues, declaring that “a fundamental shift” is underway toward religious freedom but that evangelical voters would not forget conservative values such as traditional marriage come Election Day.

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Republicans rallying behind 'religious liberty' as evangelical summit begins



ho human tibia movie1
What does heteroscopic ossification look like? Abnormal bone grows on the normally smooth cylinder-shaped tibia. Learn more about the burn and regenerative medicine laboratory at the University…

By: UMHealthSystem

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ho human tibia movie1 – Video

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

25-Sep-2014

Contact: Sandy Van sandy@prpacific.com 808-526-1708 Cedars-Sinai Medical Center @cedarssinai

LOS ANGELES (Sept. 25, 2014) Investigators at the Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute have received a grant from the National Institutes of Health to participate in a consortium taking the study of motor neuron disorders such as Lou Gehrig’s disease and spinal muscular atrophy to a new, comprehensive perspective.

“We will be working as part of an NIH initiative to create databases of disease ‘signatures’ by generating and analyzing thousands of data points. Scientists often focus on very small things, such as a single signaling pathway in cells or a single gene or protein that is involved in some way with disease development, but identifying and correcting one component rarely leads to a cure. This is especially true in the brain because its networks are very complex,” said Clive Svendsen, PhD, professor and director of the Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute, principal investigator of Cedars-Sinai’s part of the study.

Svendsen, the Kerry and Simone Vickar Family Foundation Distinguished Chair in Regenerative Medicine, compares this shift in perspective to the way meteorologists began predicting weather years ago viewing global trends and collecting vast amounts of data to create a forecast for a specific place and time.

The grant is part of an NIH initiative called the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures, or LINCS, program, which aims to develop a “library” of molecular signatures that describes how different cells respond to proteins, genes, chemicals essentially anything that may come in contact with or change the cell or its activity.

Cedars-Sinai is a member of a group, NeuroLINCS, studying motor neuron disorders, which include Lou Gehrig’s disease, also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, and spinal muscular atrophy. The NeuroLINCS study will be coordinated by researchers at the University of California, Irvine, with additional collaborators at the Gladstone Institutes at the University of California, San Francisco, Johns Hopkins University and the Broad Institute.

NeuroLINCS is one of six consortiums recently funded through NIH’s LINCS program to study diabetes, cancers and other diseases using cell lines and specialized stem cells called induced pluripotent stem cells. Derived from a patient’s own skin samples and “sent back in time” through genetic manipulation to an embryonic state, these cells can be made into any cell of the human body.

The Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute, which has developed a national reputation for the quality of its induced pluripotent stem cells, was asked to provide the stem cells for all of the consortiums. The cells are produced in the Regenerative Medicine Institute’s Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Core Facility, directed by Dhruv Sareen, PhD, assistant professor of biomedical sciences and faculty research scientist with the Department of Biomedical Sciences.

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With NIH grant, Cedars-Sinai helps bring big data to neuro disease research

Investigators at the Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute have received a grant from the National Institutes of Health to participate in a consortium taking the study of motor neuron disorders – such as Lou Gehrig’s disease and spinal muscular atrophy – to a new, comprehensive perspective.

“We will be working as part of an NIH initiative to create databases of disease ‘signatures’ by generating and analyzing thousands of data points. Scientists often focus on very small things, such as a single signaling pathway in cells or a single gene or protein that is involved in some way with disease development, but identifying and correcting one component rarely leads to a cure. This is especially true in the brain because its networks are very complex,” said Clive Svendsen, PhD, professor and director of the Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute, principal investigator of Cedars-Sinai’s part of the study.

Svendsen, the Kerry and Simone Vickar Family Foundation Distinguished Chair in Regenerative Medicine, compares this shift in perspective to the way meteorologists began predicting weather years ago – viewing global trends and collecting vast amounts of data to create a forecast for a specific place and time.

The grant is part of an NIH initiative called the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures, or LINCS, program, which aims to develop a “library” of molecular signatures that describes how different cells respond to proteins, genes, chemicals – essentially anything that may come in contact with or change the cell or its activity.

Cedars-Sinai is a member of a group, NeuroLINCS, studying motor neuron disorders, which include Lou Gehrig’s disease, also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, and spinal muscular atrophy. The NeuroLINCS study will be coordinated by researchers at the University of California, Irvine, with additional collaborators at the Gladstone Institutes at the University of California, San Francisco, Johns Hopkins University and the Broad Institute.

NeuroLINCS is one of six consortiums recently funded through NIH’s LINCS program to study diabetes, cancers and other diseases using cell lines and specialized stem cells called induced pluripotent stem cells. Derived from a patient’s own skin samples and “sent back in time” through genetic manipulation to an embryonic state, these cells can be made into any cell of the human body.

The Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute, which has developed a national reputation for the quality of its induced pluripotent stem cells, was asked to provide the stem cells for all of the consortiums. The cells are produced in the Regenerative Medicine Institute’s Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Core Facility, directed by Dhruv Sareen, PhD, assistant professor of biomedical sciences and faculty research scientist with the Department of Biomedical Sciences.

Cedars-Sinai and the Regenerative Medicine Institute also will play a major role in the data generation phase of the study. New technology enables scientists to “mine” data on a large scale, such as measuring millions of proteins in a single sample – an area of expertise for Jennifer Van Eyk, PhD, director of Cedars-Sinai’s Advanced Clinical Biosystems Research Institute and the Erika J. Glazer Chair in Women’s Heart Health. She will be co-principal investigator of Cedars-Sinai’s part of the study and will provide protein analysis for all NeuroLINCS collaborators. Other teams of experts will collect data on genetic material and the way genetic information is relayed to proteins within cells.

Svendsen said the data analysis teams will collaborate to create computer programs to pull all the information together.

“We may be looking at many thousands of data points, but using algorithms to create a ‘cloud’ of information, we expect to see a ‘signature’ emerge that shows us the relationships between proteins, genes and RNA in the cell. There will be a specific signature for healthy controls and a different one for the disease, such as Lou Gehrig’s,” Svendsen said. “Once we have that, we can try to ‘punch holes’ in the disease signature by hitting the cell with a small molecule to see how the cloud of information changes. The ultimate goal is to morph the disease cloud back into a healthy cloud. But right now, we don’t know what the disease state is. This is what we want to find out.”

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Cedars-Sinai to participate in a consortium studying motor neuron disorders

OXFORD, Miss. (PRWEB) September 26, 2014

Charles Overby, a champion of the First Amendment and the free press, has been selected to receive the 2015 Legacy Award from the Ole Miss Women’s Council for Philanthropy.

The Legacy Award, presented by C Spire, recognizes individuals who have made significant contributions as philanthropists, leaders and mentors and brought about definitive, positive changes in the University of Mississippi, state and nation. A ceremony to present the award will be April 18, 2015 at Carrier House, Chancellor Dan and Lydia Jones’ home on the UM campus, where Overby was educated as a journalist.

“Charles Overby has traveled the globe in efforts to promote First Amendment freedoms and to discuss media relations,” said Karen Moore of Nashville, OMWC chair. “In Washington, D.C., Mr. Overby led the development of the Newseum, a major specialty museum that explores how news surrounding historic moments affects our experiences.

“At Ole Miss, he continues to have a significant impact on both students and the general public through the Overby Center for Southern Journalism and Politics. The Overby Center gives individuals an opportunity to come together and discuss major issues of our region, nation and world, while creating a better understanding of media, politics and the First Amendment. The Women’s Council believes that discussing issues helps solve them.”

Overby is the former chairman of the Freedom Forum, Newseum and Diversity Institute. For 22 years, he was chief executive officer of the Freedom Forum, a nonpartisan foundation that educates people about the press and the First Amendment. His service as CEO of the Newseum spanned 1997 to 2011, during which time he supervised the building of the Newseum on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington. This interactive museum has been called the “best experience Washington has to offer.” He also was CEO of the Diversity Institute, a school created in 2001 to teach journalists and aspiring journalists while increasing diversity in newsrooms.

The Overby Center for Southern Journalism and Politics was established at Ole Miss with a $5.4 million gift from the Freedom Forum to honor Overby’s extensive professional contributions. He continues his involvement with Ole Miss students by helping them identify beneficial opportunities and internships.

Before joining the Freedom Forum, Overby was an effective public watchdog a newspaper reporter and editor for 17 years with a goal of protecting citizens by keeping them well informed. He covered Congress, the U.S. Supreme Court, the White House and presidential campaigns for Gannett Co., the nation’s largest newspaper company. He also served as the top editor at Florida Today in Melbourne, Fla., and the executive editor of The Clarion-Ledger and Jackson Daily News in Jackson. Overby supervised the news and editorial coverage that led to The Clarion-Ledger winning the Pulitzer Prize Gold Medal for Distinguished Public Service in 1983 for coverage of the need for education reform in Mississippi.

His exemplary career which began as an 11-year-old delivering newspapers at 5 a.m. for The Clarion-Ledger also includes serving as vice president of news and communications for Gannett and as a member of the management committees of Gannett and USA Today. He experienced two stints in government, as press assistant to U.S. Sen. John Stennis, a Democrat from Mississippi; and special assistant for administration to Tennessee Gov. Lamar Alexander, a Republican.

When asked about his successful career, Overby credited his mother, his wife and longtime colleague, the late Al Neuharth, founder of USA Today, the Freedom Forum and the Newseum, for mentoring and supporting him throughout his extensive career.

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Overby to Receive Coveted Legacy Award

BERKELEY, Calif. (KGO) —

On Oct. 1, 1964, students sat down at Sproul Plaza demanding the university lift its ban on political activism.

Students attending UC Berkeley today know they are being raised in the cradle of the free speech movement. For most though, the details are sketchy.

It was October 1, 1964, when Jack Weinberg, a student activist was trying to push for racial equality. He did so on the steps of Sproul Hall, knowing he could be arrested.

“I had the good fortune of being the one they selected and when I wouldn’t cooperate, they called in a police care to haul me away,” said Weinberg.

Students who had gathered at the plaza, quickly surrounded the police car.

“When the police car was brought on campus and people sat down on it somebody yelled ‘sit down’ and everybody sat down because we were used to sitting in. We had action at the Sheraton Plaza and other places,” said Lynn Hollander former student activist.

The car became the speaker’s podium and no one delivered the message more effectively than Mario Savio.

Weinberg was held in the police car for 32 hours. During that time he gave an interview to a reporter from the San Francisco Examiner.

“He was trying really, I felt, to get out of me that some older somebody or other was pulling our strings and I got mad and said, you know, here we have a saying in the movement we don’t trust anybody over 30. It was mainly a putdown,” said Weinberg.

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Berkeley's Free Speech Movement marks 50 years

September 25, 2014

Image Caption: The Space Shuttle Atlantis moves away from Hubble after the telescopes release on May 19, 2009 concluded Servicing Mission 4. The Soft Capture Mechanism, a ring that a future robotic mission can grapple in order to de-orbit the telescope, is visible in the center. Credit: NASA

April Flowers for redOrbit.com Your Universe Online

Out of every four proposals submitted to gain observation time on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), three are denied. You might think that these denials are based strictly on the merits of the study being proposed and the current viewing patterns of the telescope, but you would be wrong.

A new internal study from the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), published online currently on arXiv and coming soon to an issue of Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, reveals that gender plays a subtle, but distinct role in proposal acceptance as well. As Clara Moskowitz of Scientific American reports, in each of the last 11 proposal cycles, having a male principle investigator on the proposal made it more likely to be accepted.

Its fascinating and disturbing, Yale University astronomer Dr. Meg Urry, who formerly led the Hubble proposal review committee for several years, told Moskowitz. Urry, who feels frustrated that some of the results were during her tenure, continued, I made a lot of efforts to have women on the review committees, and during the review I spent time listening to the deliberations of each panel. I never heard anything that struck me as discriminationand my antennae are definitely tuned for such thingsso its clear the bias is very subtle, and that both men and women are biased.

First of all, HST proposals are written by teams of both men and women, each of whom contributes to the proposal and ensures its a good one, she told David Freeman of the Huffington Post. So the PI alone doesnt have that much impact on the quality of the proposal. More importantly, biases against women in STEM and other male-dominated professions have been seen in hundreds, perhaps thousands of social science experiments. So it would be very unusual if somehow astronomers were immune to the biases shared broadly by men and women in the U.S.

STScI, which administrates the HST program, initiated the study about two years ago. The research team manually reviewed all of the proposals for the last 11 cycles and then categorized them by principal investigators gender. They found that applications submitted by men fared better than those submitted by women in every cycle.

It isnt a large difference, maybe four or five fewer proposals from women selected each cycle than statistics say should be chosen based on the number of proposals submitted. You can kind of explain it away as just sampling statistics in any given cycle, but it happens every year, Neill Reid, an STScI astronomer who oversees time allocation for Hubble, told Moskowitz. It is a systematic effect. The researchers found that effect is stronger for older principal investigators (PIs); among recent graduates, the success rates for men and women are closer to equal. I could speculate whether the proposals are being written in a different way or whether the younger astronomers are more visible because theyre giving more talks. Maybe it has something to do with the institutions theyre at, Reid said.

The STScI team has no data concerning the cause or causes of the gender imbalance, so they plan to re-analyze the data to find contributing factors before consulting with social scientists who research bias to develop strategies to fight this trend.

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New Study Looks Into Hubble Telescope Gender Bias



The Minefield of Free Speech on a University Campus
On November 1, 2014 a historic first will be happening on an American university campus. Jonathan Taylor of A Voice for Male Students, Dr. Janice Fiamengo of the University of Ottawa, Karen…

By: Paul Elam

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The Minefield of Free Speech on a University Campus – Video



NSA Recruiter Assaults Student for Asking Questions About Data Collection
NSA Recruiter Assaults Student for Asking Questions About Data Collection September 18, 2014 NSAThe University of New Mexico hosted a Engineering Science Career Fair on Sept. 17, 2014 for…

By: steven O`man

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NSA Recruiter Assaults Student for Asking Questions About Data Collection – Video

By Jordan Nash | Published 09/23/14 1:16am

The definition of free speech is the crux of a recent lawsuit involving UNC and a fan of UNC athletics.

The N.C. Court of Appeals upheld the Universitys decision to indefinitely ban John Donnelly Jr. from all athletic events and facilities, according to court documents released Sept. 2.

The University banned Donnelly from athletic events Dec. 3, 2012.

According to the Universitys response to Donnellys appeal of the ban, Donnelly repeatedly called the athletic department, made sexually suggestive comments to female athletic department employees and once showed up uninvited at an athletes personal residence.

Some of these things are ridiculous (that) they are accusing me of, Donnelly said.

The court decision states Donnelly participated in harassment, speech that is not protected by the First Amendment.

Harassment is any conduct directed at a specific person that torments, terrorizes or terrifies that person and that serves no legitimate purpose, according to the N.C. General Assembly.

We hold that petitioner has failed to demonstrate that he engaged in any speech protected by the First Amendment, the court opinion states.

Kate Rech, Donnellys lawyer, disagrees with the courts decision.

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UNC fans lawsuit debates free speech

Sep 222014

Senators focus their attention to the front of the room during a meeting. Members of the SGA leadership held a town hall meeting Wednesday to discuss student concerns. Photograph by Lorin Myerson

At last weeks town hall meeting students came to voice their concerns about everything from free speech zones to future D.P. Culp University Center renovations.

The Student Government Association executives explained at the Wednesday meeting that student input is important during these meetings in order to write useful legislation and relay student concerns to ETSU President Brian Noland.

Zack, Taylor and I meet with Dr. Noland once a month to go over what students need and what their concerns are, SGA President Doretha Benn said. Student participation in these meetings gives us things to think about and it lets us know what you all really care about.

Tori Neal, a sophomore studying political science and communications with a minor in womens studies, voiced her concerns regarding use of the free speech zone in front of the library.

Can we move our free speech zone to somewhere other than directly in front of the library? Neal said. It is very distracting trying to read or study when there are preachers yelling and insulting students here. Sally Lee, SGAs adviser, and Benn explained the dilemma of moving the free speech zone from in front of the library.

If we move the free speech zone away from the library then we cant have any community events or programs there, Benn said. Unless these preachers are making a clear threat then their right to free speech allows them to be there.

As the meeting progressed, senators brought up the idea of future Culp renovations to attract more students to the area.

I dont hang out in the Culp center because theres really no where that is student friendly, said Rikesh Patel, a junior studying public health. You have food places, but more of it is a stop and go type place. Theres just a lot of offices that dont contribute to student life.

The SGA executives and senators discussed the possibility of adding on to the Culp in the new future.

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Students voice concerns



NSA Attacks Student at University of New Mexico (Angle Two)
More information and additional video here: http://importantcool.com/confronting-the-nsa-on-camera/

By: Andy Beale

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NSA Attacks Student at University of New Mexico (Angle Two) – Video

An internal study finds that female-led proposals to use the in-demand device are less likely to be selected

The Hubble Space Telescope, launched in 1990, is still in high demand among scientists. Less than a quarter of proposals for observation time are approved. NASA

For an astronomer, winning precious observation time on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) for your study is a big dealmore than three quarters of proposals are rejected. It turns out, however, that this honor is a bit easier for men to achieve than women. An internal Hubble study found that in each of the past 11 observation proposal cycles, applications led by male principal investigators had a higher success rate than those led by women. Its fascinating and disturbing, says Yale University astronomer Meg Urry, who formerly led the Hubble proposal review committee for several years and admitted to frustration that some of the results occurred during her tenure. I made a lot of efforts to have women on the review committees, and during the review I spent time listening to the deliberations of each panel. I never heard anything that struck me as discriminationand my antennae are definitely tuned for such thingsso its clear the bias is very subtle, and that both men and women are biased. The Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore runs the HST program and began the study about two years ago. After manually reviewing all proposals and categorizing them by gender the researchers found that mens applications fared better than womens in every cycle they examined. The results will be published in an upcoming issue of Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific. The effect is smallit translates to about four or five fewer proposals from women being selected each cycle than one might expect based on how many were submitted. You can kind of explain it away as just sampling statistics in any given cycle, but it happens every year, says Neill Reid, an STScI astronomer who oversees time allocation for Hubble. It is a systematic effect. The effect is stronger for older principal investigators (PIs); among recent graduates, the success rates for men and women are closer to equal. I could speculate whether the proposals are being written in a different way or whether the younger astronomers are more visible because theyre giving more talks. Maybe it has something to do with the institutions theyre at, Reid offers. Because the Hubble scientists have no information about the cause of the gender imbalance, they plan to analyze their data for contributing factors and consult social scientists who research bias about the best strategies to combat the trend. Already STScI has implemented some changes to try to level the playing field for men and women. The scientists who oversee proposal evaluation now tell reviewers before each cycle that this systematic effect exists, and that they believe unconscious bias might contribute to it. Sometimes people talk about the proposer rather than the proposal, Reid says. We ask them to focus on the science. The proposal format has also changed. Whereas the PIs name used to be in large type on the first page, they are now included among the rest of the team on page 2, and only first initials are used. Thus far, these steps have not reversed the trend, however: Women fared no better in the latest proposal-review cycle than they had before. I know STScI has tried very hard to minimize the effects of unconscious bias, Urry remarks. The only thing left is to do blind reviews, removing the names of the proposers altogether. But this is very difficult because the panels are supposed to evaluate the ability of the team to deliver what they propose. I am not sure what the answer is. A further complication is that the astronomy field is small, and reviewers may be able to guess the identities of proposers even if names are minimized or removed. Nevertheless, taking steps to make review processes as anonymous as possible has been shown to reduce bias in other scientific settings. Susan Benecchi, an astronomer at the Planetary Science Institute in Tucson, Ariz., won observing time on Hubble during the latest round of applications and previously served on a review panel. She said shes never been aware of any bias in the process. Except for the fact that PI names are on the proposal, it’s really not about the PI or team or anything other than: Do we think they can get the result they are after and is that science interesting, timely and uniquely requiring of HST? Ultimately, allocating time on Hubble is a subjective and human process, and therefore open to biases. It may be unsurprising, then, that signs of gender discrimination show up, as they do in many sectors of society. Indeed, preliminary studies at several other U.S. observatories, such as Kitt Peak National Observatory and Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, appear to show the same gender disparity in proposal success. This is a community issue not an HST issue, Reid observes. One positive development, the STScI team found, is that more and more women are applying for Hubble time. In the most recent cycles women have contributed close to 25 percent of all proposals, with the latest round featuring a greater ratio of female-led petitions than ever before. The scientists hope that this trend, at least, is one that continues.

2014 Scientific American, a Division of Nature America, Inc.

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