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Academics claim “bitcoin over Tor isn’t a good idea”, while bitcoin exchange Kraken launches.(IBTimes UK)

Bitcoin and other major cryptocurrencies have continued to see their prices slide, with nine out of the top ten most valuable mineable altcoins all falling over the last 24 hours.

The negative movement was felt most keenly by darkcoin, which saw its market capitalisation fall from around $9 million to $7.5 million in the space of just a few hours yesterday.

Bucking the trend was cannabisdarkcoin with a 65% rise in value. It is still early days for cannabisdarkcoin, having only launched on 24 October, however it is already among the top 100 most valuable cryptocurrencies.

‘Bitcoin over TOR isn’t a good idea’

Academics from the University of Luxembourg have claimed that using bitcoin over anonymous browsers like TOR could create an attack vector for ‘man-in-the-middle’ and double-spend attacks.

In a paper titled Bitcoin over TOR isn’t a good idea, Alex Biryukov and Ivan Pustogarov reiterate previous criticisms about bitcoin relating to its lack of anonymity, but also highlight issues with using it over networks widely regarded to be private and secure.

“A low-resource attacker can gain full control of information flows between all users who chose to use bitcoin over Tor,” the paper states.”In particular the attacker can link together user’s transactions regardless of pseudonyms used, control which bitcoin blocks and transactions are relayed to the user and can delay or discard user’s transactions and blocks.

“In collusion with a powerful miner double-spending attacks become possible and a totally virtual bitcoin reality can be created for such set of users.”

Kraken exchange launches in Japan

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Cryptocurrency Round-Up: Bitcoin on Tor Puts Users at Risk of Attack, Kraken Launches



Jim Kelly – Liberty University Convocation
On October 24, 2014 at Convocation, North America's largest weekly gathering of Christian students, Jim Kelly and his wife Jill and daughter Erin, spoke to s…

By: Liberty University

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Jim Kelly – Liberty University Convocation – Video

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Newswise WASHINGTON, D.C., October 30, 2014 Researchers at the University of Washington have developed a way to use sound to create cellular scaffolding for tissue engineering, a unique approach that could help overcome one of regenerative medicines significant obstacles. The researchers will present their technique at the 168th meeting of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA), held October 27-31, 2014, at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown Hotel.

The development of the new technique started with somewhat of a serendipitous discovery. The University of Washington team had been studying boiling histotripsy – a technique that uses millisecond-long bursts of high-intensity ultrasound waves to break apart tissue – as a method to eliminate cancerous tumors by liquefying them with ultrasound waves. After the sound waves destroy the tumors, the body should eliminate them as cellular waste. When the researchers examined these decellularized tissues, however, they were surprised by what the boiling left intact.

In some of our experiments, we discovered that some of the stromal tissue and vasculature was being left behind, said Yak-Nam Wang, a senior engineer at the University of Washingtons Applied Physics Laboratory. So we had the idea about using this to decellularize tissues for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

The structure that remains after decellularizing tissues is known as the extracellular matrix, a fibrous network that provides a scaffold for cells to grow upon. Most other methods for decellularizing tissues and organs involve chemical and enzymatic treatments that can cause damage to the tissues and fibers and takes multiple days. Histrostipsy, on the other hand, offers the possibility of fast decellularization of tissue with minimal damage to the matrix.

In tissue engineering, one of the holy grails is to develop biomimetic structures so that you can replace tissues with native tissue, Wang said. Stripping away cells from already developed tissue could provide a good candidate for these structures, since the extracellular matrix already acts as the cellular framework for tissue systems, Wang said.

Due to its bare composition, the matrix also induces only a relatively weak immune response from the host. The matrix could then theoretically be fed with stem cells or cells from the same person to effectively re-grow an organ.

The other thought is that maybe you could just implant the extracellular matrix and then the body itself would self-seed the tissues, if its just a small patch of tissue that youre replacing, Wang said. You wont have any immune issues, and because you have this biomimetic scaffold thats closer to the native tissue, healing would be better, and the body would recognize it as normal tissue.

Wang is currently investigating decellularization of kidney and liver tissue from large animals. Future work involves increasing the size of the decellularized tissues and assessing their in-vivo regenerative efficacy.

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High-Intensity Sound Waves May Aid Regenerative Medicine

TEMPE, AZ (CBS5) –

Free speech and a free press are basic rights of American democracy.

But are some student government leaders at Arizona State University forgetting the basics we learned all the way back in middle school?

A member of the Undergraduate Student Government has been impeached for speaking to the media, without notifying leadership first.

“Why do you need a heads up?” questioned ASU seniorIsabelle Murray. “If you’re doing everything ethically and you’re doing everything you should be, then what would it matter?”

Murray is apsychology and Spanish major who’s president of the university’s Rainbow Coalition, which represents LGBTQA students, and founder and co-facilitator of the Disabled Students Coalition.

She was also USG senator until she was impeached on Oct. 21.

According to a USG press release, Murray violated a media relations policy and another student’s privacy.

“Basically, they’re worried about their dirty laundry being aired,” Murray explained.

In early October, Murray said ASU’s student newspaper The State Press interviewed her about another senator she said was threatening a student and about a bill she was sponsoring that would ban full face-painting at games to prevent students from showing up in racially-insensitive blackface.

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ASU student senator appeals impeachment for talking to media

The British government’s insistence that its spies don’t use the vast espionage powers of the U.S. National Security Agency to sidestep U.K. restrictions on domestic eavesdropping was called into question by a court document published Wednesday.

The two-page memorandum challenges that official line, carrying an acknowledgement by Britain’s electronic eavesdropping agency GCHQ that it scoops up an undisclosed amount of “unanalyzed intercepted communications content” from its foreign intelligence partners without a warrant.

For human rights groups challenging U.K. surveillance, the document shows that GCHQ can use its allies to engage in mass spying without proper oversight.

“The British public had been consistently persuaded by government over the last year that GCHQ are not using the NSA as a backdoor to sidestep protection in the law,” said Eric King, whose group, Privacy International, has joined London-based rights group Liberty and Amnesty International in suing the spy agency.

King, whose group obtained the memo as part of its suit, said it shows “a huge gap in protection for British people.”

GCHQ declined to comment.

Andrew Defty, who teaches politics at the University of Lincoln, said GCHQ was probably right to argue that the exchange of unfiltered raw intelligence isn’t restricted by Britain’s intercept legislation, known as RIPA.

“This is in all likelihood not illegal,” said Defty, the co-author of “Watching the Watchers,” a book about parliamentary oversight of Britain’s intelligence services. “However, it does appear to go against the spirit of the law, which would seem to rest on the principle that interception must take place for a reason.”

Defty said the revelation illustrates the need to update Britain’s intercept law after the revelations by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden about mass spying.

“RIPA needs replacing,” he said.

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Court: UK Spies Get Bulk Access to NSA Data

A protest against government surveillance in Washington DC. Civil liberties groups denounced the FBIs move as brazen and potentially dangerous. Photograph: Xinhua /Landov/Barcroft Media

The FBI is attempting to persuade an obscure regulatory body in Washington to change its rules of engagement in order to seize significant new powers to hack into and carry out surveillance of computers throughout the US and around the world.

Civil liberties groups warn that the proposed rule change amounts to a power grab by the agency that would ride roughshod over strict limits to searches and seizures laid out under the fourth amendment of the US constitution, as well as violate first amendment privacy rights. They have protested that the FBI is seeking to transform its cyber capabilities with minimal public debate and with no congressional oversight.

The regulatory body to which the Department of Justice has applied to make the rule change, the advisory committee on criminal rules, will meet for the first time on November 5 to discuss the issue. The panel will be addressed by a slew of technology experts and privacy advocates concerned about the possible ramifications were the proposals allowed to go into effect next year.

This is a giant step forward for the FBIs operational capabilities, without any consideration of the policy implications. To be seeking these powers at a time of heightened international concern about US surveillance is an especially brazen and potentially dangerous move, said Ahmed Ghappour, an expert in computer law at University of California, Hastings college of the law, who will be addressing next weeks hearing.

The proposed operating changes related to rule 41 of the federal rules of criminal procedure, the terms under which the FBI is allowed to conduct searches under court-approved warrants. Under existing wording, warrants have to be highly focused on specific locations where suspected criminal activity is occurring and approved by judges located in that same district.

But under the proposed amendment, a judge can issue a warrant that would allow the FBI to hack into any computer, no matter where it is located. The change is designed specifically to help federal investigators carry out surveillance on computers that have been anonymized that is, their location has been hidden using tools such as Tor.

The amendment inserts a clause that would allow a judge to issue warrants to gain remote access to computers located within or outside that district (emphasis added) in cases in which the district where the media or information is located has been concealed through technological means. The expanded powers to stray across district boundaries would apply to any criminal investigation, not just to terrorist cases as at present.

Were the amendment to be granted by the regulatory committee, the FBI would have the green light to unleash its capabilities known as network investigative techniques on computers across America and beyond. The techniques involve clandestinely installing malicious software, or malware, onto a computer that in turn allows federal agents effectively to control the machine, downloading all its digital contents, switching its camera or microphone on or off, and even taking over other computers in its network.

This is an extremely invasive technique, said Chris Soghoian, principal technologist of the American Civil Liberties Union, who will also be addressing the hearing. We are talking here about giving the FBI the green light to hack into any computer in the country or around the world.

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FBI demands new powers to hack into computers and carry out surveillance



Dr. Lam Discusses PRP, ACell, and ATP at the Hair Transplant 360 Course
http://www.hairtx.com Dallas hair transplant surgeon, Dr. Sam Lam, discusses Regenerative Medicine, including PRP, ACell, ATP at his 6th Annual Hair Transplant 360 Course at St. Louis University…

By: Samuel Lam

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Dr. Lam Discusses PRP, ACell, and ATP at the Hair Transplant 360 Course – Video

Tom Ryan wanted to build something that could identify criminal behavior inside massive mobile networks, stock trading services, ecommerce sites, and other online operations. So he turned to a pair of familiar names for help: Facebook and the NSA.

He didnt exactly knock on Facebooks front doorlet alone the NSAs. But he did adopt a pair of sweeping software systems built by these giants of the online age, systems that help them juggle the massive amounts of digital information streaming into their computer data centers.

Ryan grabbed an NSA tool called Accumulo, which likely plays a key role in the agencys notoriously widespread efforts to monitor internet traffic in the name of national security, and he paired it with a Facebook tool called Presto, used to quickly analyze the way people, ads, and all sorts of other things behave on the worlds largest social network. Both Facebook and the NSA, you see, have open sourced their software, meaning these tools are freely available to the world at large.

Ryan is the CEO of a small Silicon Valley startup called Argyle Data. Over the past sixteen months, he and his engineering team used Accumulo and Presto to fashion software that can root out fraud inside todays massive online operations, and theyve already deployed the thing with at least a few companies, including Vodafone, the British telecommunications giant that runs mobile phone networks across Europe.

Argyle is a nicely rounded metaphor for the recent evolution of the data-juggling technologies that drive our modern businesses. Over the past several years, massive web companies such as Google and Facebookas well as similarly ambitious operations like the NSAhave built a new breed of software that can store and analyze data across tens, hundreds, and even thousands of machines, and now, these software tools are trickling down to the rest of the business world. As a startup, Ryan says, you want to build on whats new, not whats old.

The poster child for this movement is a software system called Hadoop, which was inspired by work originally done at Google. But Hadoopat least as it was originally conceivedis now giving way to tools that operate at much faster speeds. Hadoop is a batch system, meaning you assign it a task and then wait a good while for the answer to come back. Newer systems are much better at operating at speed.

Argyles software is a prime example. Using machine learning and whats called deep packet inspection, it analyzes the individual packets of data that stream across a network, and if a piece of data meets certain criteriai.e. sets off certain flagsit gets shuttled into Accumulo, a massive database that can extend across myriad machines. It helps us scan tens of millions to hundreds of millions of transactions a second, Ryan says. Companies can then use a version of Presto to further analyze this data, executing specific queries in near real-time.

Christopher Nguyen, the CEO of a data analysis startup called Adatao who once worked with similar big data software inside Google, says that Arygles method isnt necessarily the best way to analyze such massive amounts of information at speed. But he agrees that this is part of a much much larger movement towards real-time big data tools, tools that also include something called Spark, developed at the University of California at Berkeley, and various other software contraptions.

At the same time, Argyles story underlines another aspect of this movement. At the NSA, you see, Accumulo is likely part of a surveillance effort that underpins our online privacy, and as the tools like this make it easier to collect and analyze such enormous amounts data, they may help push us towards a world where privacy is eroded even further. Vodafone, after all, is using Argyles software to closely analyze data streaming across European wireless networks used by the general public.

According to Seth Schoen, a staff technologist with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, laws typically allow companies to use tools along the lines of Argyleincluding deep packet inspectionto do things like fight fraud. But in the end, their affect on privacy boils down to the policy of each individual company. The good news with Argyle, as Ryan points out, is that the NSA built Accumulo so that organizations can closely control who, within their operation, has access to each individual piece of data. Its a trade off, Ryan says. Privacy is so important. But with more data-enrichment, you can improve the results of your analytics.

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Startup Fights Fraud With Tools From Facebook, NSA

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

28-Oct-2014

Contact: Kat Zambon kzambon@gmail.com 202-326-6434 American Association for the Advancement of Science @AAAS_News

Omid Kokabee, an Iranian graduate student in physics at the University of Texas at Austin who was imprisoned for refusing to contribute to weapons research in his home country, has been awarded the 2014 Scientific Freedom and Responsibility Award from the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Kokabee, the first doctoral student to win the award, was honored by AAAS “for his courageous stand and willingness to endure imprisonment rather than violate his moral stance that his scientific expertise not be used for destructive purposes and for his efforts to provide hope and education to fellow prisoners.”

“It is uncommon that scientists risk their freedom in defense of the principle of scientific freedom for all scientists, and yet this 32-year old physicist, at the beginning of a promising career, has done just that,” the award’s selection panel said.

From a young age, Kokabee demonstrated an aptitude for science. He ranked 29th on the Iranian college admission exam and earned a degree in applied physics and mechanics from Iran’s Sharif University of Technology. Next, he completed a master’s degree in photonics at the University of Catalonia in Barcelona. After studying at the Institute of Photonic Sciences, ICFO, Kokabee enrolled in a doctoral program at the University of Texas at Austin in 2010 to study optics and photonics.

Kokabee’s work caught the attention of authorities from the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, who started asking for his assistance with military and intelligence projects as early as 2005. Kokabee repeatedly refused the offers, including a request for help developing a high-powered carbon dioxide laser used for isotope separation and a promise for a full scholarship for his doctoral program in exchange for his services.

While visiting his family in Tehran in January 2011, Kokabee declined another request to help with research related to weapons development. He was arrested at the airport the next day and held in solitary confinement for more than a month. Denied legal representation, Kokabee was repeatedly questioned and pressured to “confess.” The requests for his research assistance continued after his arrest, now with the offers of release from prison as well as threats that his family would be harmed if Kokabee did not cooperate.

After 15 months of pre-trial detention, Kokabee was convicted of conspiring with enemies of Iran and receiving “illegitimate” funds, in a televised trial in May 2012. He was sentenced to 10 years in prison, a sentence that was upheld by the Tehran Court of Appeals, which added 91 days for receiving “illicit” scholarship funds while studying in Texas.

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2014 AAAS Scientific Freedom and Responsibility Award goes to Omid Kokabee

Tom Ryan wanted to build something that could identify criminal behavior inside massive mobile networks, stock trading services, ecommerce sites, and other online operations. So he turned to a pair of familiar names for help: Facebook and the NSA.

He didnt exactly knock on Facebooks front doorlet alone the NSAs. But he did adopt a pair of sweeping software systems built by these giants of the online age, systems that help them juggle the massive amounts of digital information streaming into their computer data centers.

Ryan grabbed an NSA tool called Accumulo, which likely plays a key role in the agencys notoriously widespread efforts to monitor internet traffic in the name of national security, and he paired it with a Facebook tool called Presto, used to quickly analyze the way people, ads, and all sorts of other things behave on the worlds largest social network. Both Facebook and the NSA, you see, have open sourced their software, meaning these tools are freely available to the world at large.

Ryan is the CEO of a small Silicon Valley startup called Argyle Data. Over the past sixteen months, he and his engineering team used Accumulo and Presto to fashion software that can root out fraud inside todays massive online operations, and theyve already deployed the thing with at least a few companies, including Vodafone, the British telecommunications giant that runs mobile phone networks across Europe.

Argyle is a nicely rounded metaphor for the recent evolution of the data-juggling technologies that drive our modern businesses. Over the past several years, massive web companies such as Google and Facebookas well as similarly ambitious operations like the NSAhave built a new breed of software that can store and analyze data across tens, hundreds, and even thousands of machines, and now, these software tools are trickling down to the rest of the business world. As a startup, Ryan says, you want to build on whats new, not whats old.

The poster child for this movement is a software system called Hadoop, which was inspired by work originally done at Google. But Hadoopat least as it was originally conceivedis now giving way to tools that operate at much faster speeds. Hadoop is a batch system, meaning you assign it a task and then wait a good while for the answer to come back. Newer systems are much better at operating at speed.

Argyles software is a prime example. Using machine learning and whats called deep packet inspection, it analyzes the individual packets of data that stream across a network, and if a piece of data meets certain criteriai.e. sets off certain flagsit gets shuttled into Accumulo, a massive database that can extend across myriad machines. It helps us scan tens of millions to hundreds of millions of transactions a second, Ryan says. Companies can then use a version of Presto to further analyze this data, executing specific queries in near real-time.

Christopher Nguyen, the CEO of a data analysis startup called Adatao who once worked with similar big data software inside Google, says that Arygles method isnt necessarily the best way to analyze such massive amounts of information at speed. But he agrees that this is part of a much much larger movement towards real-time big data tools, tools that also include something called Spark, developed at the University of California at Berkeley, and various other software contraptions.

At the same time, Argyles story underlines another aspect of this movement. At the NSA, you see, Accumulo is likely part of a surveillance effort that underpins our online privacy, and as the tools like this make it easier to collect and analyze such enormous amounts data, they may help push us towards a world where privacy is eroded even further. Vodafone, after all, is using Argyles software to closely analyze data streaming across European wireless networks used by the general public.

According to Seth Schoen, a staff technologist with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, laws typically allow companies to use tools along the lines of Argyleincluding deep packet inspectionto do things like fight fraud. But in the end, their affect on privacy boils down to the policy of each individual company. The good news with Argyle, as Ryan points out, is that the NSA built Accumulo so that organizations can closely control who, within their operation, has access to each individual piece of data. Its a trade off, Ryan says. Privacy is so important. But with more data-enrichment, you can improve the results of your analytics.

Read this article:
Startup Fights Fraud With Tools From FacebookAnd the NSA

TMI

Universiti Malaya Academic Staff Association (PKAUM) views with great concern the recent developments surrounding Persatuan Mahasiswa Universiti Malayas (PMUM) event of October 27, 40 tahun dari UM ke penjara, featuring UM alumnus Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim.

PKAUM affirms that Universiti Malaya, our place of work, learning, research and intellectual exchange, and a public university of a country aspiring for democratic maturity, must safeguard academic freedom and freedom of speech.

We urge Universiti Malaya to provide a safe environment for tonights 40 tahun dari UM ke penjara, as UM has done for recent peaceful public assemblies by students as well as staff.

Universities must be safe havens for our youth to explore ideas and ideals, and to express their thoughts and sentiments. The only prohibitions should be on hate speech, defamation, violence, and other legal infringements, for which general laws are adequate.

Anwar is, of course, the leader of the federal opposition and his speech will assuredly touch on social and political matters. But how is this so bad for the university?

UMs administration claims before the event that it will tarnish the image of the university. As thinking members of UMs academic body, we do not see any basis for this fear.

PKAUM rejects the unwarranted labelling of this event as illegal and disapproves the threat of expulsion and penalties against PMUM president Fahmi Zainol.

Let us be mature, and let us nurture the maturity of our students, by encouraging diversity of ideas and opinions, instead of constricting exposure.

If anything critical is said of the university or the Malaysian government, the response should be to safeguard the same space to other parties. In fact, we are glad that two Umno political figures, Pulai MP Datuk Nur Jazlan Mohamed and Global Movement of Moderates CEO Datuk Saifuddin Abdullah, participated in a student event on UM campus a few weeks ago.

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UM must guarantee academic freedom and freedom of speech

Editor’s note: Salon has posted numerous critiques of libertarianism. This response was one of several we received offering a different view. (For more of our coverage on the topic, please see here.)

The Koch brothers have marvelous taste in art. That was the first thought that raced across my mind as I strode down the bustling hallway of one of the most secretive and influential buildings in American politics. Slipped against a wall of churning rural winds and rolling wheat fields, Koch Industries the media-christened Death Star of contemporary libertarian insurrection was the last place I ever intended to visit. Six years earlier I was serving time in a West Coast county jail, not defending public choice theory. But trial and error will do strange things to a politically inclined and introspective desperado.

I dont just break the libertarian mold, I napalm it. Im Hispanic. I live below the poverty line. I joined a gang by 15, dropped out of high school by 17, and spent the first half of my 20s playing guitar in a raucous punk band. Yet despite how unconventional my background might seem, it unmistakably epitomizes just how diverse the broader libertarian movement has become over a relatively short burst of time, even as archaic perceptions in the media and public continue to stubbornly linger.

Following my release from jail I enrolled in community college and worked hard to account for misplaced time. Eventually I earned a speech communication scholarship and admittance into a number of highly regarded universities, including my dream school the University of California-Berkeley. It was the moment I had been waiting for. But by the time I procured housing in Oakland, old inclinations began to take hold. I knew that if I remained in California I would either gravitate back toward the violent gang world, or the drug-laden music world, I knew so well.

So I made a drastic decision. At the last minute I instead took up an offer from the most conservative school in the most conservative state in the country Brigham Young University in Utah. The education was superb, but the social setting was difficult. I stood out on campus with all my tattoos. I was irritable because I had agreed to abstain from alcohol and sex. And though students and faculty always treated me with dignity and respect, I sometimes had trouble relating to people.

Eventually I stumbled across a libertarian student group at a separate university across town. From there I attended a number of events, made a few new friends and began perusing literature from prominent free-market philosophers such as Friedrich Hayek, Milton Friedman and Ludwig von Mises all of whom contested everything I thought I knew about Republicans, Democrats and government.

The limited government message appealed to me. I recalled playing in a band and struggling to comply with overbearing tax laws. I remembered serving time with low-level drug offenders convicted under mandatory minimum sentencing laws. I thought back to the Mexican communities I had grown up in and the undocumented immigrants I knew who had been forced into a life of obscurity because of convoluted immigration policies. The assortment of unique experiences I had taken in over time suddenly swiveled full circle.

Within a year I was organizing full time and attending dinners with governors, prominent activists and presidential candidates such as Ron Paul. Eventually I returned to the West Coast to finish school. From there I was introduced to a number of Koch-funded organizations. The opportunities these organizations presented would prove invaluable. As a student, I interned through various summer programs. As a writer, I wrote for various websites and journals. And as a speaker, I spoke to various groups.

The libertarian movement never judged me because of my background. Though I was still rough around the edges, I was embraced and provided with more tools and opportunities to improve myself than I knew what to do with. These organizations not only helped hone my innate abilities, but taught me the value of tolerance and restraint (Im still working on the latter).

Ultimately, libertarianism didnt radicalize me, it moderated me. As a wayward teen I once adored revolutionaries like Che Guevara and took part in violent and destructive protests. I smashed windows of private businesses and helped overturn police cars in my misplaced animosity toward legal constructs and trade. Later I abandoned my progressive leanings and explored conservatism. I supported the war in Iraq and brandished an American flag in a clich spectacle of nationalism and machismo. Like most libertarians, I paddled both ends of the whirling political waters in search of something, anything, that put the puzzle pieces together.

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My unusual libertarian journey: How a former outlaw broke the political mold



The Bitcoin Course | An overview of Bitcoin mining [Chris Shepherd]
Chris walks us through the Bitcoin mining process and how it contributes to the blockchain.

By: Draper University

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The Bitcoin Course | An overview of Bitcoin mining [Chris Shepherd] – Video

The University of California, Berkeley, celebrates the 50th anniversary of the Free Speech Movementthis fall, but some students arent happy having an outspoken free-speech advocate on campus. Following news Tuesday that Bill Maher has been tapped to deliver the keynote address at UC Berkeleys graduation in December, critics of the liberal, antireligious rabble-rouser launched a petition this week demanding that the school reconsider.

Bill Maher is a blatant bigot and racist who has no respect for the values UC Berkeley students and administration stand for, wrote the petitioner, identified on Change.org as Khwaja Ahmed of Irvine. In a time where climate is a priority for all on campus, we cannot invite an individual who himself perpetuates a dangerous learning environment.

The petition follows a much-debated segment on HBOs Real Time With Bill Maher, in which the host sparred with Gone Girl actor Ben Affleck over radical Islam, arguing that fundamentalist views are commonly held in Muslim communities, not the exception as Affleck asserted.

Maher, an avowed atheist, made the 2008 movie “Religulous” and often criticizes organized religion on the late-night program, but this segment went particularly viral, attracting more than 1.2 million views on YouTube, and dominating cable news panels earlier this month. In the clip, Maher said liberals should stand up for principles like free speech, but not everyone bought his argument.

As of Friday morning, the petition on Change.org has attracted more than 700 signatures, with many commenters identifying themselves as current and former students of Berkeley and other UC schools. As an alumni I cant let the future generation of Cal Bears be tainted by false information, ignorance, and racist views, one person wrote.

A press rep for Berkeley did not immediately respond to a request to comment. The schools official newspaper, the Daily Californian, announced Tuesday that Maher will speak at the schools graduation ceremony on Dec. 20.

The campus is the site of the Free Speech Movement, a historic student protest that began in 1964. On the 50th anniversary of that event, some free-speech advocates have been calling on the school to further loosen policies that regulate campus speech.

Read the full petition here.

Got a news tip? Email Christopher Zara here. Follow him on Twitter @christopherzara.

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Bill Maher At UC Berkeley? No Way Say Some Students Following Radical Islam Debate



The Bitcoin Course | Bitcoin will change the world [Tim Draper]
Tim discusses what inspired him to invest in the Bitcoin ecosystem and how the technology can transform the world.

By: Draper University

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The Bitcoin Course | Bitcoin will change the world [Tim Draper] – Video



Liberty Football Feature: A Family Connection
Today's feature takes a look at Flames' tight end Garrett Long and his family's unique dilemma that occurred on Aug. 30 when Liberty opened its 2014 football season at North Carolina. Long's…

By: Liberty University Flames

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Liberty Football Feature: A Family Connection – Video



The Bitcoin Course | Securing Bitcoin [Olaf Carlson-Wee]
Olaf discusses his vision for Bitcoin's future and how Coinbase works to secure Bitcoin for users.

By: Draper University

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The Bitcoin Course | Securing Bitcoin [Olaf Carlson-Wee] – Video

This week a prominent feminist was forced to cancel lectures at USU because of a threat made on her life.

Well, that’s oversimplifying it, you see, Anita Sarkeesian, a feminist noteworthy for her comments on the portrayal of women in video games, had every intention of going through with the speech except for one minor hiccup, the state of Utah’s gun laws.

According to Utah law, the government can’t stop anyone from bringing a gun to a concealed event. So. although our second amendment rights are protected, there’s no guarantee of any security at pretty much any event.

Although the university promised to provide security, how can anyone feel safe if you can’t legally take a gun from someone.

Does the right to carry a concealed weapon outweigh the safety of someone who simply wants to speak their mind on an issue.

The threat on Sarkeesian was one of gun violence, so why couldn’t we put away our guns for one day to hear an individual express their opinions, as protected by the first amendment.

Yes, many gun owners are responsible, and that guns in hands of honest citizens can in some cases make us safer.

I’m also not saying protecting the second amendment is bad, but can we at least find a compromise somewhere.

Are there lives worth protecting that we are willing to occasionally give up our weapons for?

Even gun owners understand the sacrifices we must make for safety of others.

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Second amendment shouldn't infringe on our other freedoms

This sign was taken away from Florida State University football fan Mick Zarr at Saturdays ESPN College GameDay pregame show. Zarr says his rights were violated when the sign taken from him. (Photo: Courtesy of Mick Zarr )

Florida State football fan Mick Zarr has an issue with ESPN and he believes it’s his right to say so.

Ahead of undefeated and second-ranked FSU’s barn-burner matchup Saturday with then-No. 5 Notre Dame he crafted a sign that summed up what he perceives is biased reporting in the sports giant’s coverage of the Seminoles. He also believes ESPN favors the football powerhouse Southeastern Conference.

His sign read, “ESECTMZPN: The worldwide leaders in tabloid urinalism” and he held it up for the world to see Saturday morning during ESPN’s live GameDay broadcast from in front of FSU’s Doak Campbell Stadium .

He was joined by hundreds of others gripping signs for ESPN.

“I wanted to make a sign that was impactful, yet wouldn’t get me into trouble,” Zarr, 36, told the Democrat. “I wanted one where I could catch people’s attention.”

He did get attention. But it was that of an ESPN-hired security guard who requested he turn over his sign right before the show started at 9 a.m.

“They’re really on me, I got to get that sign out of here,” Zarr said the security told him.

Zarr assumed he was talking about ESPN producers. He didn’t want any trouble, but he still asked why his sign was one causing the trouble.

“They’re all over me about it. I got to get it out of here,” the security guard stressed.

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Does ESPN's GameDay control free speech?

JOHNSON CITY, Tenn. –

It’s been 50 years since President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act into law. One of the people who played a role in making that happen spoke at ETSU on Monday.

When Hank Thomas stood up to speak, he started singing songs of freedom.

“Things are wonderful in this country now that I can truly say ‘My Country, ‘Tis Of Thee’ and ‘God Bless America’,” he said.

In May of 1961, however, there was a much different tone.

“I may be in this university but I certainly would not be welcomed,” said Thomas. “The law of the land as far as the South was concerned, every time I got aboard a bus, whether a municipal bus or an interstate bus, I was supposed to go to the back of the bus.”

Thomas decided to board a bus in Washington D.C. that was headed to Louisiana to fight for desegregation. He was only 19-years-old and a sophomore at Howard University.

Thomas became one of seven “Freedom Riders” on board that bus.

When the bus got to the Alabama border, a mob was waiting. Thomas told us the crowd disabled the bus by slashing the tires.

“The bus driver could not drive the bus any further and all the windows of the bus were broken out,” said Thomas. “The bus driver got off the bus and really ran for his life but we were able to lock the door so they could not get in.”

Original post:
Freedom Rider remembers civil rights movement



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