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A year and a half into the release of classified documents by Edward Snowden, the existence of far-reaching National Security Agency surveillance is common if controversial knowledge.

But until The Intercept published new documents this month, the role of American companies in that surveillance was less than clear, ProPublicas Julia Angwin and Jeff Larson tell Editor-in-Chief Steve Engelberg in this weeks podcast.

The new documents describe “contractual relationships” between the NSA and unnamed U.S. companies and reveal that the NSA has “under cover” spies working at or with some of them. And indeed, it would be difficult for the NSA to do its work without their help, Larson says.

The important thing about todays communications infrastructure is that it doesnt respect country borders, he says, Youre no longer looking at Soviet signals in Russia youre trying to cast a wide net and collect information thats traveling maybe through the United States while it goes from, say, London to China.

The cooperating companies in question, though unnamed in the new documents, are almost certainly telecommunications companies that lay the fiber for data communications, Angwin says, as they are really the first point of attack for anyone whos trying to do surveillance, whether theyre a criminal, or the NSA.

Aside from privacy concerns, Angwin also notes theres the simple question of cost surveillance has quadrupled to $80 billion since 9/11 vs. benefit. Were, you know, a year and a half into the Snowden leaks, she says, and the NSA has yet to provide clear evidence that any of the surveillance has worked to prevent an attack, right?

Hear the full podcast on iTunes, SoundCloud and Stitcher, or read more:

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Podcast: When U.S. Companies Help the NSA



Liberty Cap Talk Live – An 80 Minute LCTL Interview with Mike Renzulli
Mike Renzulli, a self-professed “Objectivst” and pro-war hawk and anti-Islam activist who ranted about his views of radical Islam and why he thought Islam was a direct threat to the United…

By: Liberty Cap Talk Live

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Liberty Cap Talk Live – An 80 Minute LCTL Interview with Mike Renzulli – Video



Rainbow Beach, in St. Croix, United States Virgin Islands
Our wonderful travel editor Q visited the famous, Rainbow Beach, in St. Croix, United States Virgin Islands. Rainbow Beach is one mile away from the ports, and makes it a popular destination…

By: RockDaBox.net

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Rainbow Beach, in St. Croix, United States Virgin Islands – Video



All About – Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution
What is Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution? A report all about Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution for homework/assignment The Fourth Amendment (Amendment…

By: All About

Originally posted here:
All About – Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution – Video

Rudy Giuliani says, "I am morally outraged that a man like Noriega is seeking to inhibit our creative rights in the United States."

Link:
Activision: Noriega's Call of Duty Lawsuit Is an "Outrageous Offense" to First Amendment

It’s former New York mayor Rudy Giuliani versus former Panama dictatorManuel Noriega in the latter’s lawsuit alleging that video game developerActivision Blizzard violates his name and likeness in its best-sellinggame Call of Duty: Black Ops II. Giuliani, now a named partner atBracewell & Giuliani, is defending the game publisher, and to hear himtell it, the former dictator’s claims are an “outrageous offense to the First Amendment.”

In a press conference Thursday following a Los Angeles Superior Courthearing on the case, Giuliani went after Noriega personally for suingover his likeness in the game. “I am morally outraged that a man likeNoriega is seeking to inhibit our creative rights in the United States.If creative rights have to be sacrificed, they shouldn’t be sacrificedfor someone like Noriega, nor should anyone have to send millions ofdollars down to a Panamanian jail because this madman is making absurdclaims,” he told reporters.

Also readManuelNoriegaon ‘Call of Duty’: My Grandchildren Asked Why I Was the Target

“I think a man that engaged in selling $200 million of cocaine in theUnited States, who knows how many children he killed, a man who was adictator of his country in which he tortured people for nine years, a manwho laundered money in France, a man who chopped the head off of one of his allies and then was convicted in three countries, who is sitting injail in Panama, trying to recover because he is a minor, minor figure ina very excellent game, Call of Duty by Activision, is an outrage,”Giuliani continued.

Noriega was convicted in the United States for money laundering and drugtrafficking in 1992. Then extraditions led to prison sentences in Parisand Panama, where he has been since 2011. In July, he nevertheless filedsuit against Activision Blizzard, claiming that he is given a defamatorydepiction in two Black Ops II levels set in 1980s Panama. His character is the villain, and he’s “portrayed as the victim of numerous fictionalheinous crimes,” his complaint alleges.

See more Hollywood’s 100 Favorite Films

The lawyers for the video game publisher, who include Kelly Klaus atMunger, Tolles & Olse alongside Giuliani, have filed a special motion tostrike on the grounds that the game’s use of the Noriega character isprotected by first amendment legislation. If Noriega wins, it will openthe gates for historical figures of all stripes to censor their inclusionin creative works or even historical documentation, they argue.

“The reason I’m involved in this case is I see the significance of the First Amendment,” Giuliani told reporters. “Should Noriega be allowed tosucceed, it would virtually destroy the historical novel, the historical movies like [Lee Daniels'] The Butler and Zero Dark Thirty, inwhich historical figures are portrayed.”

He added, “If Noriega were to succeed in this case, as I told the judge,Bin Laden’s heirs would be able to sue for Zero Dark Thirty.”

In a response to the game developer’s motion to strike the lawsuit, filed weeks ago, Noriega’s attorneys argued that regardless of the time for which the character is present, the mission that includes him is “a major if not the most key level of the game.” They included numerous snapshots of the gameplay to establish the Noriega character’s prominence, including “Noriega with a shotgun in hand,” “Noriega getting choked” and “Noriega in the first-person shooter’s crosshairs.”

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Rudy Giuliani Calls Manuel Noriega's 'Call of Duty' Lawsuit "Outrageous Offense to the First Amendment"

The recent data breach outbreak in the retail and financial sectors drives home the fact the United States faces a massive cybersecurity conundrum but this should not come as a surprise to anyone.

While the issue of keeping cyber criminals at bay is a monumental task all on its own, there is another perhaps more vexing cyber-related concern plaguing the nation: Both industry and government are struggling to find enough bodies to deal with the digital pandemic.

A report from Cisco (CSCO) found demand for cybersecurity experts has grown at three and a half times the pace of the overall I.T. job market, with an estimated 1 million unfilled cybersecurity jobs across the globe in 2014.

At the heart of the matter is a lack of younger Americans in the cybersecurity talent pool.

In its recent survey on millennials and cybersecurity, Raytheon (RTN) and the National Cyber Security Alliance found nearly two-thirds of millennial respondents are not sure what the cybersecurity profession is. Additionally, in that same study, only 26% strongly agree their high school education prepared them to use technology safely, securely, ethically and productively in the workplace.

The National Security Agency is looking to change that.

In an effort to groom talent and stress the importance of cybersecurity education, the agency introduced its National Centers for Academic Excellence, Cyber Operations Program in 2012. That program has since expanded to include a total of 13 undergraduate and graduate programs in the United States with the U.S. Military Academy, New York University, the University of New Orleans, Towson University, and the University of Cincinnati being added to the list in 2014.

The agency is trying to increase the future pipeline of cyber professionals of the nation — not just for NSA, but for academia, industry and the rest of government, Steven LaFountain, Dean of NSAs College of Cyber, said in an interview with Firewall. We’re doing that by trying to influence the security curriculum that’s being taught at the university level.

In doing so, the agency has mapped out specific standards that colleges and universities must fulfill in order to gain designation as a Cyber Operations Center of Academic Excellence.

NSA benefits by utilizing the program to identify top talent for its ranks, and students benefit by becoming more attractive to prospective employers once they enter the job market.

Read more from the original source:
NSA Grooming Cyber Talent through Academics



All About – Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution
What is Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution? A report all about Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution for homework/assignment The F…

By: All About

See the article here:
All About – Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution – Video

Published October 14, 2014

NEW YORK A man accused of creating an online, underworld bank that helped launder $6 billion for drug dealers, child pornographers, identity thieves and other criminals was facing his first court appearance in Manhattan.

Arthur Budovsky, 40, the Costa Rican founder of currency transfer and payment processing company Liberty Reserve, was scheduled to appear in federal court in Manhattan on Tuesday afternoon. He was extradited from Spain to the U.S. on Friday.

Once an American, Budovsky renounced his citizenship after setting up the company in Costa Rica, where all online businesses are legal and there aren’t laws regulating them.

Budovsky was arrested in Spain on May 23 and held to face a Manhattan indictment against him and others.

U.S. officials accuse Budovsky of using Liberty Reserve as a kind of underworld bank that handled about $6 billion worth of illicit transactions for 1 million users, including 200,000 in the U.S.

Budvosky has said he created a secure platform for online financial transactions, and Liberty Reserve cooperated with investigators. According to court documents, Budvosky moved his business to Costa Rica after he was convicted on state charges related to an unlicensed money transmitting business.

When he announced the charges in May 2013, U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara said Liberty Reserve “became the bank of choice for the criminal underworld.”

He said the case might represent the largest international money laundering case ever brought by the United States.

During the Liberty Reserve investigation, authorities raided 14 locations in Panama, Switzerland, the U.S., Sweden and Costa Rica. In Costa Rica, investigators recovered five luxury cars, including three Rolls-Royces. Authorities also seized Liberty’s computer servers in Costa Rica and Switzerland.

View post:
Liberty Reserve founder extradited from Spain to US faces first NY court appearance

Senate committee chairman Sam Dastyari has vowed to investigate corporate tax avoidance. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

Forty ofAustralia’s biggest companies will be asked to explain their tax affairs to a Senate committee investigating corporate tax avoidance.

Companies shown, in a recent report, to have the lowest “effective tax rate” over the past decade and to operate the most subsidiaries in tax havens have been given the chance to outline their tax strategies before the committee decides which corporate leaders to call in to appear before public hearings.

The Senate can subpoena witnesses and committee chairman Sam Dastyari has vowed to use that power if the inquiry encounters resistance from big business.

Companies that will be invited to explain their persistently low tax contributions, according to the report, include shopping centre company Westfield, building products firm James Hardie, motorway group Transurban,SydneyAirport, Telstra, SingTel and Echo Entertainment, owner ofSydney’s Star casino.

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The Greens, who led the push to form the tax inquiry, have vowed to call multinationals Apple, Google and Swiss-based miner Glencore to face questions about their tax contribution toAustralia.

The report, Who pays for our common wealth?,found almost a third of the nation’s largest companiesare paying less than 10 in the dollar in company tax and some companies, including global broadcaster 21st Century Fox and Toll Holdings, operate dozens of subsidiaries in low-tax jurisdictions such as the Cayman Islands, the British Virgin Islands and Bermuda.

A recent tax justice report in the United States found that US companies that claim to have business in tax havens declared profits that equate to $870,000 for each person that lives in those three tiny island nations.

There is a certain office block, known as Ugland House, in the Caymans that is the registered address of 18,857 companies.

More:
Tax probe to issue 'please explains'

Senate committee chairman Sam Dastyari has vowed to investigate corporate tax avoidance. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

Forty ofAustralia’s biggest companies will be asked to explain their tax affairs to a Senate committee investigating corporate tax avoidance.

Companies shown, in a recent report, to have the lowest “effective tax rate” over the past decade and to operate the most subsidiaries in tax havens have been given the chance to outline their tax strategies before the committee decides which corporate leaders to call in to appear before public hearings.

The Senate can subpoena witnesses and committee chairman Sam Dastyari has vowed to use that power if the inquiry encounters resistance from big business.

Companies that will be invited to explain their persistently low tax contributions, according to the report, include shopping centre company Westfield, building products firm James Hardie, motorway group Transurban,SydneyAirport, Telstra, SingTel and Echo Entertainment, owner ofSydney’s Star casino.

Advertisement

The Greens, who led the push to form the tax inquiry, have vowed to call multinationals Apple, Google and Swiss-based miner Glencore to face questions about their tax contribution toAustralia.

The report, Who pays for our common wealth?,found almost a third of the nation’s largest companiesare paying less than 10 in the dollar in company tax and some companies, including global broadcaster 21st Century Fox and Toll Holdings, operate dozens of subsidiaries in low-tax jurisdictions such as the Cayman Islands, the British Virgin Islands and Bermuda.

A recent tax justice report in the United States found that US companies that claim to have business in tax havens declared profits that equate to $870,000 for each person that lives in those three tiny island nations.

There is a certain office block, known as Ugland House, in the Caymans that is the registered address of 18,857 companies.

Read the rest here:
Senate inquiry demands answers from low-tax companies

Senate committee chairman Sam Dastyari has vowed to investigate corporate tax avoidance. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

Forty ofAustralia’s biggest companies will be asked to explain their tax affairs to a Senate committee investigating corporate tax avoidance.

Companies shown, in a recent report, to have the lowest “effective tax rate” over the past decade and to operate the most subsidiaries in tax havens have been given the chance to outline their tax strategies before the committee decides which corporate leaders to call in to appear before public hearings.

The Senate can subpoena witnesses and committee chairman Sam Dastyari has vowed to use that power if the inquiry encounters resistance from big business.

Companies that will be invited to explain their persistently low tax contributions, according to the report, include shopping centre company Westfield, building products firm James Hardie, motorway group Transurban,SydneyAirport, Telstra, SingTel and Echo Entertainment, owner ofSydney’s Star casino.

Advertisement

The Greens, who led the push to form the tax inquiry, have vowed to call multinationals Apple, Google and Swiss-based miner Glencore to face questions about their tax contribution toAustralia.

The report, Who pays for our common wealth?,found almost a third of the nation’s largest companiesare paying less than 10 in the dollar in company tax and some companies, including global broadcaster 21st Century Fox and Toll Holdings, operate dozens of subsidiaries in low-tax jurisdictions such as the Cayman Islands, the British Virgin Islands and Bermuda.

A recent tax justice report in the United States found that US companies that claim to have business in tax havens declared profits that equate to $870,000 for each person that lives in those three tiny island nations.

There is a certain office block, known as Ugland House, in the Caymans that is the registered address of 18,857 companies.

Read more here:
Companies asked to please explain

A man accused of creating an online, underworld bank that helped launder $6 billion for drug dealers, child pornographers, identity thieves and other criminals was facing his first court appearance in Manhattan.

Arthur Budovsky, 40, the Costa Rican founder of currency transfer and payment processing company Liberty Reserve, was scheduled to appear in federal court in Manhattan on Tuesday afternoon. He was extradited from Spain to the U.S. on Friday.

Once an American, Budovsky renounced his citizenship after setting up the company in Costa Rica, where all online businesses are legal and there aren’t laws regulating them.

Budovsky was arrested in Spain on May 23 and held to face a Manhattan indictment against him and others.

U.S. officials accuse Budovsky of using Liberty Reserve as a kind of underworld bank that handled about $6 billion worth of illicit transactions for 1 million users, including 200,000 in the U.S.

Budovsky has said he created a secure platform for online financial transactions, and Liberty Reserve cooperated with investigators. According to court documents, Budovsky moved his business to Costa Rica after he was convicted on state charges related to an unlicensed money transmitting business.

When he announced the charges in May 2013, U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara said Liberty Reserve “became the bank of choice for the criminal underworld.”

He said the case might represent the largest international money laundering case ever brought by the United States.

During the Liberty Reserve investigation, authorities raided 14 locations in Panama, Switzerland, the U.S., Sweden and Costa Rica. In Costa Rica, investigators recovered five luxury cars, including three Rolls-Royces. Authorities also seized Liberty’s computer servers in Costa Rica and Switzerland.

Read more here:
Liberty Reserve Founder Faces Court Appearance

Edward Snowden, the former NSA contractor and infamous leaker of the agencys massive surveillance program, is again asking the government to allow him to return to the United States and stand trial for his alleged crimes. In an exclusive video interview with The New Yorker on Saturday, Snowden said government officials had routinely declined his requests to allow him to come back and stand trial.

Original post:
Edward Snowden Asks U.S. for a Fair Trial

noun 1.

an amendment to the U.S. Constitution, ratified in 1791 as part of the Bill of Rights, providing chiefly that no person be required to testify against himself or herself in a criminal case and that no person be subjected to a second trial for an offense for which he or she has been duly tried previously.

British Dictionary definitions for Fifth Amendment Expand

an amendment to the US Constitution stating that no person may be compelled to testify against himself and that no person may be tried for a second time on a charge for which he has already been acquitted

(US) take the fifth, take the fifth amendment, to refuse to answer a question on the grounds that it might incriminate oneself

Fifth Amendment in Culture Expand

One of the ten amendments to the United States Constitution that make up the Bill of Rights. The Fifth Amendment imposes restrictions on the government’s prosecution of persons accused of crimes. It prohibits self-incrimination and double jeopardy and mandates due process of law.

Read the original post:
Fifth amendment | Define Fifth amendment at Dictionary.com

Published October 09, 2014

KINGSTON, Jamaica A Cayman Islands jury on Thursday found a former premier not guilty of nearly a dozen criminal charges about two years after he was ousted from office on suspicion of corruption.

Prosecutors alleged McKeeva Bush had illegally tapped his government credit card to withdraw nearly $50,000 in casinos in the Bahamas and the United States, using some of the cash to gamble on slot machines.

The jury of four men and three women deliberating about seven hours, and unanimously cleared Bush of six counts of misconduct and five counts of breach of trust in the tiny British Caribbean territory that is one of the world’s biggest financial centers.

In a statement after the verdict was delivered, Bush said the charges “were nothing more than the result of a conspiracy to remove me from power.” He has repeatedly asserted that he did not break any laws and that he was the victim of a smear campaign by political opponents.

Bush and a few dozen supporters hugged and cheered outside the courtroom after Justice Michael Mettyear had departed.

Bush, the British Caribbean territory’s longest serving politician, lost a no-confidence vote in December 2012 and was ousted as the islands’ No. 1 politician after police arrested him at his home on suspicion of misusing a government credit card and other charges.

The charges rocked the Cayman Islands, where Bush had been the premier since his United Democratic Party won 2009 general elections. He wielded great power within the territory because he was in charge of finance, tourism and development as well as being head of government.

A few months after his arrest, Bush’s fractured party was defeated in parliamentary elections. He retained his seat as a lawmaker in his powerbase in a populous district of Grand Cayman. He also remained head of his political faction.

Read the rest here:
Cayman Islands jury clears ex-premier of all criminal charges nearly 2 years after his ouster

FIRE ISLAND, N.Y., Oct. 8 (UPI) — A federally backed $207-million plan to replenish the sands along the beaches of New York’s Fire Island has been stalled, thanks to an ongoing lawsuit filed by the state chapter of the Audubon Society which argues the project would threaten the federally protected piping plover.

Proponents of the project, which is backed by the Army Corps of Engineers and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, argue that reinforcing the beaches with additional sand is essential to protecting the people and property of Fire Island — and preventing future storm damage from the likes of Hurricane Sandy.

In the lawsuit, the Audubon Society argues the beach rehabilitation project will “inhibit natural renewal of ephemeral pools, bay tidal flats and open vegetation,” and prevent “natural storm processes that create habitat to act unimpeded.”

“The burying of existing beaches under dredged material temporarily destroys available prey resources along the coast while the construction of dunes running parallel to the ocean fragments nesting habitat from optimal foraging habitat and prevents plovers from accessing bayside areas for foraging,” the plaintiffs add.

The Audubon Society and their allies say the project is also a massive waste of money — throwing away millions on a short-term and unreliable fix. But local supporters of the plan say environmentalists are valuing birds over people.

“They are asserting that habitat protection trumps the safety and security of the residents living in Mastic Beach and other low-lying South Shore communities,” state representative Tim Bishop, D-Southampton, said in a statement. “This is a position I simply cannot support. I believe the action of Audubon New York in this instance, particularly as the dredging contract was about to be awarded, is indefensible.”

At a hearing in federal court on Wednesday, a judge declined to lift the current injunction on the sand replenishment plans. The plaintiffs say they don’t want to thwart the project in its entirety, but only wish to spare two vital nesting grounds on Fire Island. As of now, it appears federal officials may have to rethink their plans before they’re able to move ahead with construction.

2014 United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Read the original here:
Piping plover stalling plans to replenish Fire Island beaches

Oct 092014

Twitter's First Amendment challenge to government surveillance rules could hinge on the Supreme Court's "Citizens United" ruling.

See the article here:
Twitter's 1st Amendment fight



NSA Digging Fiber Optic Cable to my House
These look like construction workers but are actually agents of the United States National Security Agency. The high tech surveillance equipment they are burying is causing bees and birds to…

By: Garth Kiser

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NSA Digging Fiber Optic Cable to my House – Video

With only a month until the scheduled trial of Ross Ulbricht, the alleged creator of the Silk Road drug site, Ulbrichts defense lawyers have zeroed in on the argument that the U.S. government illegally hacked the billion-dollar black market site to expose the location of its hidden server. The prosecutions latest rebuttal to that argument takes an unexpected tack: they claim that even if the FBI did hack the Silk Road without a warrantand prosecutors are careful not to admit they didthat intrusion would be a perfectly law-abiding act of criminal investigation.

On Monday evening the prosecutors submitted the latest in a series of combative court filings from the two sides of the Silk Road case that have clashed over Ulbrichts Fourth Amendment right to privacy. The governments new argument responds to an affidavit from an expert witness, tech lawyer Joshua Horowitz, brought in by Ulbrichts defense to poke holes in the FBIs story of how it located the Silk Road server. In a letter filed last week, Horowitz called out inconsistencies in the FBIs account of stumbling across the Silk Roads IP address while innocently entering miscellaneous data into its login page. He testified that the FBIs actions instead sounded more like common hacker intrusion techniques. Ulbrichts defense has called for an evidentiary hearing to cross examine the FBI about the operation.

In the governments rebuttal, however, Ulbrichts prosecutors dont directly contest Horowitz description of the FBIs investigation, though they do criticize his testimony in passing as factually and analytically flawed in a number of respects. Instead, they obliquely argue that the foreign location of the sites server and its reputation as a criminal haven mean that Ulbrichts Fourth Amendment protections against unreasonable searches dont apply, even if the FBI did use hacking techniques to penetrate the Silk Road, and did so without a warrant.

Even if the FBI had somehow hacked into the [Silk Road] Server in order to identify its IP address, such an investigative measure would not have run afoul of the Fourth Amendment, the prosecutors new memo reads. Given that the SR Server was hosting a blatantly criminal website, it would have been reasonable for the FBI to hack into it in order to search it, as any such hack would simply have constituted a search of foreign property known to contain criminal evidence, for which a warrant was not necessary.

The Silk Road server in question, after all, was located not in the United States but in a data center near Reykjavik, Iceland. And though Ulbricht is an American citizen, the prosecutors argue that the servers location abroad made it fair game for remote intrusion. Because the SR Server was located outside the United States, the Fourth Amendment would not have required a warrant to search the server, whether for its IP address or otherwise, the prosecutions filing reads.

In a footnote, the memo adds another strike against Ulbrichts Fourth Amendment protections: The Silk Road was not only hosted in a foreign data center, but also rented from a third-party web hosting service. And because Ulbricht allegedly violated the companys terms of service by using its computers to deal in narcotics and other contraband, that company was exempted from any obligation to protect his privacy.

Finally, prosecutors argue that for the 30-year-old Texan to claim privacy protections for Silk Roads server, he would have to declare that it belonged to hima tricky Catch-22. Ulbricht hasnt claimed personal possession of that computers data, as doing so would almost certainly incriminate him. But because he hasnt he cant claim that his privacy was violated when it was searched, according to the prosecutors reasoning. Because Ulbricht has not submitted any affidavit alleging that he had any possessory interest in the SR Serverlet alone one that would give him a reasonable expectation of privacyhis motion should be denied, reads the prosecutors filing.

Early Tuesday, Judge Katherine Forrest ordered Ulbrichts defense to decide within the day whether it will argue that Ulbricht did have an expectation of privacy for the Silk Road server, as well as all his other seized computers and online accounts. Shes given him until the end of the day Wednesday to make that argument Ulbrichts defense didnt immediately respond to a request for comment.

The pre-trial motion over which Ulbrichts defense lawyers and the prosecution have been sparring for the last two months doesnt directly seek to have the central narcotics conspiracy and money laundering charges against Ulbricht dismissed. Instead, his lawyers have sought to prove that the evidence gathered by law enforcement is tainted. If the initial pinpointing of Silk Roads server was illegal, they argue, practically all the evidence from the resulting investigation could be rendered inadmissible.

Early last month, the government responded to that motion with an affidavit from former FBI agent Christopher Tarbell describing how the Silk Road server was first found. As he described it, a misconfiguration of the anonymity software Tor allowed the sites login page to leak its IP address.

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Feds Hacked Silk Road Without a Warrant? Perfectly Legal, Prosecutors Argue



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