Cyborg | Designer-Babies | Futurism | Futurist | Immortality | Longevity | Nanotechnology | Post-Human | Singularity | Transhuman

Imagine having to say goodbye to everything you have ever known and loved, including your family, friends and your country.

At this very moment, someone is wrestling with that gut-wrenching decision somewhere in the world.

It’s a choice between life and death.

When they decide to flee, the journey for some begins to Detroit, to a place appropriately called Freedom House.

“If you can imagine having to flee your country and the last touch you had was one of electrocution, one of brutality, the least I can do is greet somebody with a hug,” said Deb Drennan, the executive director at Freedom House.

Freedom House is a temporary shelter for people who are seeking asylum in the United States and Canada. Asylum-seekers live at Freedom House free of charge and receive assistance with the legal process.

Freedom House is located in an unassuming brick building in the 2600 block of W. Lafayette Boulevard in Detroit.

Dozens of people from countries all over the world live together as a family inside Freedom House.

Many of the residents have been persecuted because of their ethnicity, nationality, religion, politics or sexual orientation.Their physical scars only tell half of the horror of what they have endured in their native country. I was introduced to Freedom House last November and quickly became a volunteer. It began as a three to four hour a week commitment, but over the last several months it has turned into much more than that.

I spend most of my time at Freedom House with my language partner. He’s from a French-speaking country in West Africa.I can’t reveal my language partner’s name, show you a picture of him or go into detail about his story.It’s not because he did anything wrong; it’s to protect hisfamily who could be targeted in West Africa if his location is revealed on the internet.

Read the original here:
Will Jones: 'Freedom House' changed my life

Published October 28, 2014

NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg gives a policy speech entitled “A unique Alliance with a clear course” at an event hosted by the German Marshall Fund of the United States, in Brussels on Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2014. (AP Photo/Geert Vanden Wijngaert)(The Associated Press)

NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg gives a policy speech entitled “A unique Alliance with a clear course” at an event hosted by the German Marshall Fund of the United States, in Brussels on Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2014. (AP Photo/Geert Vanden Wijngaert)(The Associated Press)

NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg gives a policy speech entitled “A unique Alliance with a clear course” at an event hosted by the German Marshall Fund of the United States, in Brussels on Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2014. (AP Photo/Geert Vanden Wijngaert)(The Associated Press)

BRUSSELS NATO’s new secretary general says only a strong Western alliance can negotiate better ties with Russia.

Jens Stoltenberg said Tuesday that his experience as Norway’s prime minister was that robust defense capabilities and a strong trans-Atlantic bond were fundamental to bring about constructive relations with Russia.

In his first policy speech since taking office Oct. 1, Stoltenberg said there was no contradiction between wanting to keep NATO strong and continuing to attempt to engage with the leadership of Russian President Vladimir Putin.

“NATO is here to say. Russia is here to say. So we’re going to have some kind of relationship,” Stoltenberg said. The question, he said, is “what kind.”

Continue reading here:
NATO secretary general: strong alliance needed to secure better ties with Russia

Hopes are rising that multinational companies operating in New Zealand may soon be paying a fairer share of tax.

The French official leading the global clampdown on multinational tax rorts says the scrapping of the notorious “double Irish” tax loophole shows aggressive tax planning is on the way out.

Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) tax director Pascal Saint-Amans said tax planning had become the core strategy of some companies, which were competing on how much tax they could avoid rather than on the quality of their products.

Speaking to Fairfax Media from Paris, Saint-Amans said the environment was changing. But he said new moves by some countries, including Ireland, to offer companies tax breaks on profits that were derived from patents had the potential to undermine progress, if rules concerning the concessions were not made clear.

Saint-Amans is in charge of the OECD’s Base Erosion and Profit-Shifting (Beps) programme. It was established with the support of the G20 last year to prevent multinationals exploiting gaps in international law to dodge tax.

The Beps project appeared to chalk up an early victory recently when Irish Finance Minister Michael Noonan announced the country would call time on the double-Irish rort by 2020.

Companies including Google, Apple, Facebook, Starbucks and Pfizer are reported to have routed billions of dollars of profits to Caribbean tax havens using the loophole, which exploits the fact that companies can be registered in Ireland but not deemed resident in the country for tax purposes.

Ireland’s decision showed the Beps project was being taken seriously and a game-changer, Saint-Amans said.

“It is a recognition that the environment has changed and that tax planning will not be as it used to be in the future. Companies should of course optimise and should plan, but to reduce marginally the tax burden, not to massively reduce it as the core element of their strategy,” he said.

Angst over multinational tax rorts has been bubbling in New Zealand for several years, aided by a Dominion Post report in 2010 that Google New Zealand expected to pay just $7726 tax in respect of its previous financial year, less than the average teacher or construction worker. Bloomberg put the international spotlight on Google’s tax affairs in 2010 when it reported that the internet search giant paid just 2.4 per cent tax on the billions it earned outside the United States.

See the article here:
Multinationals feeling heat on tax rorts



United States v Cook Islands – World Cup, Game 7, 2013
Game 7 of the 2013 Rugby League World Cup between United States and Cook Islands at The Memorial Ground, Bristol. United States 1. Kristian Freed 2. Bureta Faraimo 3. Michael Garvey 4.

By: Rugby League Official

Link:
United States v Cook Islands – World Cup, Game 7, 2013 – Video

On October 1, Free Speech day in California, former National Security Agency subcontractor-turned-whistleblower Edward Snowden sent the following message to veterans of Berkeley’s Free Speech Movement. It was read aloud on the Savio Steps by FSM vet Jack Radey during a rally marking the 50th anniversary of the day students surrounded a police car to prevent the arrest of a political activist who had been tabling for the Congress of Racial Equality.

Thank you for inviting me to speak to you today, as we recognize the 50th Anniversary of the Free Speech Movement.

Berkeley’s unparalleled traditions of student activism and community engagement have been both a challenge and in inspiration to human rights movements worldwide. They compel us to imagine the world that we want to live in and to stand up for itand they show us that with vision and persistence, we can change the world. I am honored to join with you today to celebrate that tradition.

The threats to free expression in the United States and around the world today are vast and complex. In order to better understand and combat these new threats, we must look back on the great victories of the Free Speech Movement and its part in the people’s movements that created checks on government power at that time.

Many of these checks, unfortunately, have now been almost completely eroded. The extraordinary mass surveillance and censorship capabilities and unprecedented government secrecy require us, once again, to take urgent action to preserve our free societies.

This is the challenge of our generation.

While new technologies have introduced extraordinary opportunities for free expression and communication around the globe, governments have, in secret, worked against these forces to reengineer these new capabilities as tools of mass surveillance and oppression.

Surveillance, without regard to the rule of law or our basic human dignity, creates societies that fear free expression and dissent, the very values that have made America strong. When we know we’re being watched, we impose restraints on our behavioreven clearly innocent activitiesjust as surely as if we were ordered to do so.

On this campus in 1964, Mario Savio said, “There is a time when the operation of the machine becomes so odious, makes you so sick at heart, that you can’t take part.” Over the past fifteen months, people around the world have spoken out and continue to stand up against the forces of censorship and surveillance. Together, we will restore the public’s seat at the table of government.

Read the original here:
Exclusive to The Planet: Edward Snowden's Message to Berkeley On the 50th Anniversary of the Free Speech Movement



NATO mission remains unaccomplished in Afghanistan
It all began from here. The 9/11 attacks on the United States of America! Washington quickly blamed Osama Bin Laden for these brazen attacks and used it as a…

By: PressTV News Videos

The rest is here:
NATO mission remains unaccomplished in Afghanistan – Video



Why the NSA is breaking our encryption — and why we should care | Matthew Green | TEDxMidAtlantic
This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Encryption dates back to the Founding Fathers and the Bill of Rights. Now, the United States National…

By: TEDx Talks

Original post:
Why the NSA is breaking our encryption — and why we should care | Matthew Green | TEDxMidAtlantic – Video



Rainbow Beach, in St. Croix, United States Virgin Islands
Our wonderful travel editor Q visited the famous, Rainbow Beach, in St. Croix, United States Virgin Islands. Rainbow Beach is one mile away from the ports, and makes it a popular destination…

By: RockDaBox.net

View post:
Rainbow Beach, in St. Croix, United States Virgin Islands – Video



All About – Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution
What is Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution? A report all about Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution for homework/assignment The Fourth Amendment (Amendment…

By: All About

Originally posted here:
All About – Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution – Video

Rudy Giuliani says, "I am morally outraged that a man like Noriega is seeking to inhibit our creative rights in the United States."

Link:
Activision: Noriega's Call of Duty Lawsuit Is an "Outrageous Offense" to First Amendment

Former New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani, now defendingActivision Blizzard inManuel Noriegas Call of Duty: Black Ops II lawsuit, called the legal matter an outrageous offense to the first amendment during a recent press conference (via The Hollywood Reporter). Giuliani spoke following a hearing at the Los Angeles Superior Court in which the Activision Blizzard legal team arguedfor a special motion to strike on the grounds that the games inclusion of Noriegas likeness is protected under the first amendment.

Giuliani contended that, should thelawsuit succeed, it would send us down a dangerous, slippery slope toward censorship. The reason Im involved in this case is I see the significance of the First Amendment, he said. Should Noriega be allowed tosucceed, it would virtually destroy the historical novel, the historical movies like The Butler and Zero Dark Thirty, inwhich historical figures are portrayed. If Noriega were to succeed in this case, as I told the judge,Bin Ladens heirs would be able to sue for Zero Dark Thirty.

Related:Former NYC mayor Rudy Giuliani to represent Activision against Manuel Noriega

His response then turned into a personal attack on Noriega:I think a man that engaged in selling $200 million of cocaine in the United States, who knows how many children he killed, a man who was a dictator of his country in which he tortured people for nine years, a man who laundered money in France, a man who chopped the head off of one of his allies and then was convicted in three countries, who is sitting in jail in Panama, trying to recover because he is a minor, minor figure in a very excellent game, Call of Duty by Activision, is an outrage,

Noriega, for his part, responded to Activision Blizzards motion to dismiss with a statement clarifying his position.I first became aware that my image and likeness was being utilized in Call of Duty: Black Ops II, the former Panamanian dictator explained,when my grandchildren played the game and asked why, in the video game, their target was to capture my character.

Incidents such as this andLindsay Lohans similar lawsuit against Rockstar Games overGrand Theft Auto Vare setting important, legal precedent for the future of gaming. As the medium grows up and starts to tackle more serious subject matter, it will fall under increasingly serious scrutiny. The path fromentertainment to art form is fraught,but these uncomfortable conversations are vital tothe mediums future.

See the rest here:
Noriegas Call of Duty lawsuit an outrageous offense to basic protections, Giuliani says

It’s former New York mayor Rudy Giuliani versus former Panama dictatorManuel Noriega in the latter’s lawsuit alleging that video game developerActivision Blizzard violates his name and likeness in its best-sellinggame Call of Duty: Black Ops II. Giuliani, now a named partner atBracewell & Giuliani, is defending the game publisher, and to hear himtell it, the former dictator’s claims are an “outrageous offense to the First Amendment.”

In a press conference Thursday following a Los Angeles Superior Courthearing on the case, Giuliani went after Noriega personally for suingover his likeness in the game. “I am morally outraged that a man likeNoriega is seeking to inhibit our creative rights in the United States.If creative rights have to be sacrificed, they shouldn’t be sacrificedfor someone like Noriega, nor should anyone have to send millions ofdollars down to a Panamanian jail because this madman is making absurdclaims,” he told reporters.

Also readManuelNoriegaon ‘Call of Duty’: My Grandchildren Asked Why I Was the Target

“I think a man that engaged in selling $200 million of cocaine in theUnited States, who knows how many children he killed, a man who was adictator of his country in which he tortured people for nine years, a manwho laundered money in France, a man who chopped the head off of one of his allies and then was convicted in three countries, who is sitting injail in Panama, trying to recover because he is a minor, minor figure ina very excellent game, Call of Duty by Activision, is an outrage,”Giuliani continued.

Noriega was convicted in the United States for money laundering and drugtrafficking in 1992. Then extraditions led to prison sentences in Parisand Panama, where he has been since 2011. In July, he nevertheless filedsuit against Activision Blizzard, claiming that he is given a defamatorydepiction in two Black Ops II levels set in 1980s Panama. His character is the villain, and he’s “portrayed as the victim of numerous fictionalheinous crimes,” his complaint alleges.

See more Hollywood’s 100 Favorite Films

The lawyers for the video game publisher, who include Kelly Klaus atMunger, Tolles & Olse alongside Giuliani, have filed a special motion tostrike on the grounds that the game’s use of the Noriega character isprotected by first amendment legislation. If Noriega wins, it will openthe gates for historical figures of all stripes to censor their inclusionin creative works or even historical documentation, they argue.

“The reason I’m involved in this case is I see the significance of the First Amendment,” Giuliani told reporters. “Should Noriega be allowed tosucceed, it would virtually destroy the historical novel, the historical movies like [Lee Daniels'] The Butler and Zero Dark Thirty, inwhich historical figures are portrayed.”

He added, “If Noriega were to succeed in this case, as I told the judge,Bin Laden’s heirs would be able to sue for Zero Dark Thirty.”

In a response to the game developer’s motion to strike the lawsuit, filed weeks ago, Noriega’s attorneys argued that regardless of the time for which the character is present, the mission that includes him is “a major if not the most key level of the game.” They included numerous snapshots of the gameplay to establish the Noriega character’s prominence, including “Noriega with a shotgun in hand,” “Noriega getting choked” and “Noriega in the first-person shooter’s crosshairs.”

See the original post:
Rudy Giuliani Calls Manuel Noriega's 'Call of Duty' Lawsuit "Outrageous Offense to the First Amendment"

The recent data breach outbreak in the retail and financial sectors drives home the fact the United States faces a massive cybersecurity conundrum but this should not come as a surprise to anyone.

While the issue of keeping cyber criminals at bay is a monumental task all on its own, there is another perhaps more vexing cyber-related concern plaguing the nation: Both industry and government are struggling to find enough bodies to deal with the digital pandemic.

A report from Cisco (CSCO) found demand for cybersecurity experts has grown at three and a half times the pace of the overall I.T. job market, with an estimated 1 million unfilled cybersecurity jobs across the globe in 2014.

At the heart of the matter is a lack of younger Americans in the cybersecurity talent pool.

In its recent survey on millennials and cybersecurity, Raytheon (RTN) and the National Cyber Security Alliance found nearly two-thirds of millennial respondents are not sure what the cybersecurity profession is. Additionally, in that same study, only 26% strongly agree their high school education prepared them to use technology safely, securely, ethically and productively in the workplace.

The National Security Agency is looking to change that.

In an effort to groom talent and stress the importance of cybersecurity education, the agency introduced its National Centers for Academic Excellence, Cyber Operations Program in 2012. That program has since expanded to include a total of 13 undergraduate and graduate programs in the United States with the U.S. Military Academy, New York University, the University of New Orleans, Towson University, and the University of Cincinnati being added to the list in 2014.

The agency is trying to increase the future pipeline of cyber professionals of the nation — not just for NSA, but for academia, industry and the rest of government, Steven LaFountain, Dean of NSAs College of Cyber, said in an interview with Firewall. We’re doing that by trying to influence the security curriculum that’s being taught at the university level.

In doing so, the agency has mapped out specific standards that colleges and universities must fulfill in order to gain designation as a Cyber Operations Center of Academic Excellence.

NSA benefits by utilizing the program to identify top talent for its ranks, and students benefit by becoming more attractive to prospective employers once they enter the job market.

Read more from the original source:
NSA Grooming Cyber Talent through Academics



All About – Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution
What is Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution? A report all about Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution for homework/assignment The F…

By: All About

See the article here:
All About – Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution – Video

Published October 14, 2014

NEW YORK A man accused of creating an online, underworld bank that helped launder $6 billion for drug dealers, child pornographers, identity thieves and other criminals was facing his first court appearance in Manhattan.

Arthur Budovsky, 40, the Costa Rican founder of currency transfer and payment processing company Liberty Reserve, was scheduled to appear in federal court in Manhattan on Tuesday afternoon. He was extradited from Spain to the U.S. on Friday.

Once an American, Budovsky renounced his citizenship after setting up the company in Costa Rica, where all online businesses are legal and there aren’t laws regulating them.

Budovsky was arrested in Spain on May 23 and held to face a Manhattan indictment against him and others.

U.S. officials accuse Budovsky of using Liberty Reserve as a kind of underworld bank that handled about $6 billion worth of illicit transactions for 1 million users, including 200,000 in the U.S.

Budvosky has said he created a secure platform for online financial transactions, and Liberty Reserve cooperated with investigators. According to court documents, Budvosky moved his business to Costa Rica after he was convicted on state charges related to an unlicensed money transmitting business.

When he announced the charges in May 2013, U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara said Liberty Reserve “became the bank of choice for the criminal underworld.”

He said the case might represent the largest international money laundering case ever brought by the United States.

During the Liberty Reserve investigation, authorities raided 14 locations in Panama, Switzerland, the U.S., Sweden and Costa Rica. In Costa Rica, investigators recovered five luxury cars, including three Rolls-Royces. Authorities also seized Liberty’s computer servers in Costa Rica and Switzerland.

View post:
Liberty Reserve founder extradited from Spain to US faces first NY court appearance

Microsoft says it’s patching a Windows security flaw cited in a report on alleged spying by Russian hackers. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

Microsoft says it’s patching a Windows security flaw cited in a report on alleged spying by Russian hackers.

A group of hackers, allegedly from Russia, found a fundamental flaw in Microsoft Windows and exploited it to spy on Western governments, NATO, European energy companies and an academic organization in the United States.

That’s according to new research from iSight Partners, a Dallas-based cybersecurity firm.

Last month, the U.S. and the U.K. were preparing to meet at a NATO summit to talk about Ukraine. Emails were flying back and forth. Different experts were offering to talk at the conference. And in the midst of all the digital traffic, hackers jumped into the conversation.

Patrick McBride, a spokesman with iSight, says the hackers targeted specific officials using a well-known kind of attack called spear-phishing. Hackers would craft a message with a PowerPoint document attached. For example, they’d say, “We’d like to be involved in the conference.”

And when an unknowing recipient opened the corrupted PowerPoint, the file was exploited to load a piece of malware onto the computer that the attacker could then use later to “exfiltrate documents,” McBride says.

The hacker group, dubbed the “Sandworm Team,” allegedly pulled emails and documents off computers from NATO, Ukrainian government groups, Western European government officials, and energy sector and telecommunications firms.

In the mad dash to grab information, McBride says, the hackers got a little sloppy and dropped hints about their identity. He says they’re Russian, “but we can’t pinpoint if they work for the Russian government or work in a particular department in the government.”

The Russian embassy did not immediately respond to NPR’s inquiry. Microsoft says that Tuesday, it’s patching the security flaw so that PowerPoint and other Office products can’t be exploited again in the same way.

See original here:
Microsoft Windows Flaw Let Russian Hackers Spy On NATO, Report Says

Staying anonymous online could get a lot simpler with Anonabox, a pocket-sized networking device due to launch early next year.

The $51 device plugs into any standard Internet router and pipes all traffic through the Tor network. The traffic then moves through multiple computers on Tors network, erasing its tracks along the way, before finally hitting the open Internet. The result is an anonymous and encrypted connection straight out of the box.

While Tor already offers a Web browser for this purpose, extending Tors capabilities to other programs requires a complicated setup process. Even opening an attachment from Tor can create risk, as the outside program could connect to the Internet without keeping the user anonymous. By plugging directly into the router, Anonabox promises to anonymize all Internet activity regardless of what program youre using.

Why this matters: Between overreaching government data collection in the United States, censorship in other countries and the rise of the darknet, theres a huge demand for products that hide their users online activities. Anonabox is hitting all the right notes at just the right time, with a low-cost product thats supposedly easy to use and to conceal. That may explain why the Kickstarter campaign is nearing $300,000 as of this writingfar beyond Anonaboxs $7,500 goal.

As Wired points out, Anonabox is not the first device of its kind. Devices like Torouter and Portal require technical know-how to replace a routers stock software, while OnionPi arrives as a kit that must be assembled by the user. Anonaboxs closest competitor is SafePlug, a $49 device that plugs into any router, but its larger and potentially less secure. By comparison, Anonabox is small enough to conceal in a pants pocket, and the creators promise to test and configure each unit by hand to make sure theyre working properly.

For now, the Tor community isnt giving a full endorsement, though Tors executive director Andrew Lewman told Wired that the device looks promising. Micah Lee, lead technologist for The Intercept, suggested that users still fire up the Tor browser in conjunction with the box, as it avoids fingerprinting techniques that other browsers use to track individuals around the Web.

Given that this is a Kickstarter project, potential buyers need to reserve some skepticism as well. However, the creators note that the product is already fully functional and ready for large-scale production, with backup vendors in place. At a glance, it seems like a well-organized campaign, and a potentially valuable tool for protestors, privacy paranoids and Internet miscreants alike.

The rest is here:
Anonabox promises a portable, streamlined way to use Tor to hide your online tracks

Senate committee chairman Sam Dastyari has vowed to investigate corporate tax avoidance. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

Forty ofAustralia’s biggest companies will be asked to explain their tax affairs to a Senate committee investigating corporate tax avoidance.

Companies shown, in a recent report, to have the lowest “effective tax rate” over the past decade and to operate the most subsidiaries in tax havens have been given the chance to outline their tax strategies before the committee decides which corporate leaders to call in to appear before public hearings.

The Senate can subpoena witnesses and committee chairman Sam Dastyari has vowed to use that power if the inquiry encounters resistance from big business.

Companies that will be invited to explain their persistently low tax contributions, according to the report, include shopping centre company Westfield, building products firm James Hardie, motorway group Transurban,SydneyAirport, Telstra, SingTel and Echo Entertainment, owner ofSydney’s Star casino.

Advertisement

The Greens, who led the push to form the tax inquiry, have vowed to call multinationals Apple, Google and Swiss-based miner Glencore to face questions about their tax contribution toAustralia.

The report, Who pays for our common wealth?,found almost a third of the nation’s largest companiesare paying less than 10 in the dollar in company tax and some companies, including global broadcaster 21st Century Fox and Toll Holdings, operate dozens of subsidiaries in low-tax jurisdictions such as the Cayman Islands, the British Virgin Islands and Bermuda.

A recent tax justice report in the United States found that US companies that claim to have business in tax havens declared profits that equate to $870,000 for each person that lives in those three tiny island nations.

There is a certain office block, known as Ugland House, in the Caymans that is the registered address of 18,857 companies.

Read this article:
Tax 'please explains' on the way

Senate committee chairman Sam Dastyari has vowed to investigate corporate tax avoidance. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

Forty ofAustralia’s biggest companies will be asked to explain their tax affairs to a Senate committee investigating corporate tax avoidance.

Companies shown, in a recent report, to have the lowest “effective tax rate” over the past decade and to operate the most subsidiaries in tax havens have been given the chance to outline their tax strategies before the committee decides which corporate leaders to call in to appear before public hearings.

The Senate can subpoena witnesses and committee chairman Sam Dastyari has vowed to use that power if the inquiry encounters resistance from big business.

Companies that will be invited to explain their persistently low tax contributions, according to the report, include shopping centre company Westfield, building products firm James Hardie, motorway group Transurban,SydneyAirport, Telstra, SingTel and Echo Entertainment, owner ofSydney’s Star casino.

Advertisement

The Greens, who led the push to form the tax inquiry, have vowed to call multinationals Apple, Google and Swiss-based miner Glencore to face questions about their tax contribution toAustralia.

The report, Who pays for our common wealth?,found almost a third of the nation’s largest companiesare paying less than 10 in the dollar in company tax and some companies, including global broadcaster 21st Century Fox and Toll Holdings, operate dozens of subsidiaries in low-tax jurisdictions such as the Cayman Islands, the British Virgin Islands and Bermuda.

A recent tax justice report in the United States found that US companies that claim to have business in tax havens declared profits that equate to $870,000 for each person that lives in those three tiny island nations.

There is a certain office block, known as Ugland House, in the Caymans that is the registered address of 18,857 companies.

Read more here:
Companies asked to please explain

Welcome to Google’s actual offices in Dublin, Ireland.

“I am abolishing the ability of companies to use the Double Irish by changing our residency rules to require all companies registered in Ireland to also be tax resident,” Irish Finance Minister Michael Noonan said in a statement accompanying the governments new 2015 budget on Tuesday. “This legal change will take effect from the 1stof January 2015 for new companies. For existing companies, there will be provision for a transition period until the end of 2020.”

The move will affect many tech firms that take advantage of this arrangement such as Apple, Amazon, Adobe, Microsoft, and Google. Last year, for example, Google alone cut billions off of its tax bill.

Google declared $60 billion worth of revenue in the United States in 2013. Googles effective tax rate in the United States has fallen dramatically from 21 percent to 15.7 percent in recent years as the company has broadened its use of overseas tax benefits.

As Google stated in its 2013 annual report, “Our provision for income taxes and our effective tax rate decreased from 2012 to 2013, primarily as a result of proportionately more earnings realized in countries that have lower statutory tax rates as well as the federal research and development credit related to the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012.”

In July 2014, Ars reported thatGoogle Ireland Limited paid an effective tax rate of just 0.16 percent on 17 billion ($22.8 billion) revenue in 2013. That bill came to a mere 27.7 million ($37.2 million). Google paid 11.7 billion in “administrative expenses,” which The Irish Times reports “largely refers to royalties paid to other Google entities, some of which are ultimately controlled from tax havens such as Bermuda.”

Google and many other tech firms have recently come underincreased scrutiny for using a quirky Irish tax law arrangement that allows organizations to incorporate in Ireland but legally route money through other jurisdictionssuch as the Netherlands. It’s all done in the name of drastically reducing tax burdens. The general term is called “transfer pricing,” although specific tactics involve colorful names like the “Double Irish” and the “Dutch Sandwich.”

Samuel Brunson, a professor of tax law at Loyola University Chicago, said that such a move was a long time coming.

“It does seem like a good thing, albeit a delayed good thing,” he told Ars.”With the low corporate tax rate, though, I assume Ireland will still actively try to attract foreign direct investment, and even aggressive tax planning, since its corporate rate is staying at 12.5 percent and it still has its web of tax treaties. Still, although theres bound to be some way to arbitrage the change, it seems like a move toward a cleaner global set of international taxes.”

Ars has previously detailedhow the Double Irish works. Bloomberg reporter Jesse Drucker first described the process in 2010: a company sells or licenses its foreign rights forintellectual property developed in the United States to a subsidiary in a country with lower tax rates. The result? Foreign profits that come from that techlike the rights to Googles search and advertising technology, effectively the keys to the kingdomare now attributed to that offshore subsidiary rather than the Mountain View, California headquarters. The subsidiaries have to pay “arms length” prices for those rights, just like an outside company would.

Read more here:
Ireland to phase out Double Irish tax trickery, to Googles chagrin



FireFox! Start Your Own Web Hosting Company
Web Hosting Advertise Here $10 a Month Affordable web-hosting
Pierre Teilhard De Chardin




Designer Children | Prometheism | Euvolution | Transhumanism

Sign up below for the Prometheism / Designer Children Discussion Forum

Subscribe to prometheism-pgroup

Powered by us.groups.yahoo.com