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The islands at the centre of a row between Tokyo and Beijing are covered by the US-Japan defence alliance, Barack Obama told a newspaper ahead of his arrival in Tokyo.

Obama, who begins a tour of Asia that will also take in South Korea, the Philippines and Malaysia, is the first sitting US president to explicitly affirm that hostile action against the island chain would spark an American reaction.

“The policy of the United States is clear – the Senkaku Islands are administered by Japan and therefore fall within the scope of Article 5 of the US-Japan Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security,” Obama said in a written interview with the Yomiuri Shimbun.

“And we oppose any unilateral attempts to undermine Japan’s administration of these islands,” he said.

Several senior US figures, including former secretary of state Hillary Clinton and Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel have made similar statements, which Tokyo covets as a way to warn China away from territories it claims as the Diaoyus.

Obama’s week-long tour of Asia is being dubbed a “rebalancing” eastward of US foreign policy by the White House.

Although China is not on his itinerary, its presence will be felt on every leg at a time of complex regional disputes and questions about US strategy.

The row over ownership of the Senkakus is not new, but has burst to the fore in the past two years, with paramilitary vessels from both sides jostling in nearby waters to assert control.

In November, China declared an air defence identification zone over the East China Sea, including the skies above the islands.

“I’ve also told (Chinese) President Xi (Jinping) that all our nations have an interest in dealing constructively with maritime issues, including in the East China Sea,” Obama told the Yomiuri.

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Obama: Disputed islands part of US-Japan alliance

Tension: a Japanese coast guard vessel shadowing a Chinese surveillance ship last year near the disputed islands known as Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China. Photo: AP

Tokyo: Islands at the centre of a row between Tokyo and Beijing are covered by the US-Japan defence alliance, Barack Obama told a newspaper ahead of his arrival in Tokyo.

Mr Obama, on a tour of Asia that will also take in South Korea, the Philippines and Malaysia, is the first sitting US president to explicitly affirm that hostile action against the island chain would spark an American reaction.

“The policy of the United States is clear – the Senkaku Islands are administered by Japan and therefore fall within the scope of Article 5 of the US-Japan Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security,” Mr Obama said in a written interview with Japan’s Yomiuri Shimbun newspaper.

“We oppose any unilateral attempts to undermine Japan’s administration of these islands,” he said.

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Several senior US figures, including former secretary of state Hillary Clinton and Defence Secretary Chuck Hagel, have made similar statements, which Tokyo covets as a way to warn China away from territories it claims as the Diaoyu islands.

Mr Obama’s week-long tour of Asia is being dubbed a “rebalancing” eastward of US foreign policy by the White House.

Although China is not on his itinerary, its presence will be felt on every leg at a time of complex regional disputes and questions about US strategy.

On Wednesday, China’s state-run Xinhua news agency published a comment piece criticising US policy in the region as “a carefully calculated scheme to cage the rapidly developing Asian giant”.

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Disputed islands part of US-Japan alliance: Obama

Apr 232014

The islands at the centre of a row between Tokyo and Beijing are covered by the US-Japan defence alliance, Barack Obama told a newspaper ahead of his arrival in Tokyo.

Obama, who begins a tour of Asia that will also take in South Korea, the Philippines and Malaysia, is the first sitting US president to explicitly affirm that hostile action against the island chain would spark an American reaction.

‘The policy of the United States is clear – the Senkaku Islands are administered by Japan and therefore fall within the scope of Article 5 of the US-Japan Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security,’ Obama said in a written interview with the Yomiuri Shimbun.

‘And we oppose any unilateral attempts to undermine Japan’s administration of these islands,’ he said.

Several senior US figures, including former secretary of state Hillary Clinton and Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel have made similar statements, which Tokyo covets as a way to warn China away from territories it claims as the Diaoyus.

Obama’s week-long tour of Asia is being dubbed a ‘rebalancing’ eastward of US foreign policy by the White House.

Although China is not on his itinerary, its presence will be felt on every leg at a time of complex regional disputes and questions about US strategy.

The row over ownership of the Senkakus is not new, but has burst to the fore in the past two years, with paramilitary vessels from both sides jostling in nearby waters to assert control.

In November, China declared an air defence identification zone over the East China Sea, including the skies above the islands.

‘I’ve also told (Chinese) President Xi (Jinping) that all our nations have an interest in dealing constructively with maritime issues, including in the East China Sea,’ Obama told the Yomiuri.

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Disputed islands part of alliance

TOKYO–(BUSINESSWIRE)– Shiseido Co., Ltd. (TOKYO:4911) announces plans to open the Shiseido Cell-Processing and Expansion Center (SPEC) on May 1, 2014. The center, located in the in the Kobe Biomedical Innovation Cluster in Kobe, Japan, will centralize research and development on hair regenerative medicine with an aim toward commercialization. Regenerative medicine in Japan is an emerging …

Excerpt from:
Shiseido Opens Research Facility Dedicated to Hair Regeneration

Shiseido Co., Ltd. (TOKYO:4911) announces plans to open the Shiseido Cell-Processing and Expansion Center (SPEC) on May 1, 2014. The center, located in the in the Kobe Biomedical Innovation Cluster in Kobe, Japan, will centralize research and development on hair regenerative medicine with an aim toward commercialization.

Regenerative medicine in Japan is an emerging industry which the government aims to foster through new legislation and revisions to existing law as part of economic reform strategies, in order to advance in this field. Shiseido has a long history of conducting comprehensive research and working towards commercialization of the regenerative medicine for hair.

Shiseido’s hair regenerative medicine technology

With the goal of clinical application of regenerative medicine to treat alopecia and thinning hair, Shiseido concluded a technical collaboration agreement in July 2013 with a Canadian bio-venture company RepliCel Life Sciences Inc. (hereinafter referred to as “RepliCel”) acquiring an exclusive geographic license to use RepliCel Hair-01 (RCH-01) hair regeneration technology in Asia, including Japan.

RCH-01 has been developed over 10 years of scientific research, and safe application in humans has been validated by RepliCel’s phase 1 clinical trial. RepliCel has patents issued for hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells and their usage in Japan, the United States, Australia and the EU. RCH-01 is an “autologous cell transplantation technology,” in which specific cells(1) isolated from the hair follicles(2) taken from the scalp of a patient are cultured and implanted (injected) into the balding scalp area, potentially stimulating residing hair follicles and promoting new growth in the balding scalp area. (1) Dermal Sheath Cup cells, which are believed to play an important role in promoting hair growth (2) A hair follicle is a skin organ composed of various cell types that support hair growth and structure.

Kobe Biomedical Innovation Cluster

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Shiseido Cell-Processing and Expansion Center to be opened in Kobe, Japan

Feb 072014

Outside the Lee Ufan Museum, Naoshima. Photo: Getty Images

An unlikely art trail in a remote corner of Japan has Danielle Demetriou captivated.

I am standing in a dark, windowless room resonating with the sound of a human heartbeat, each pulsating thump accompanied by a strobe-like flicker of light.

This is not because I am in the bowels of an underground nightclub in Tokyo. Nor am I detained in a mental institute (despite the presence of a woman in a clinical white outfit just the other side of the door).

Giant pumpkin at Shikoku Island. Photo: AFP

My location is a wooden building on a forest-fringed beach on a tiny fishing island in Japan – and I am inside a modern art installation.

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The appreciation of contemporary art usually takes place in a gallery. But things are done differently in Japan – in particular, in the Seto Inland Sea area. Scattered with 3000-plus islands, this idyllic expanse of blue water is dubbed the Mediterranean of Japan on account of its temperate climate and olive trees.

It is in this region, about 640 kilometres south of Tokyo, that hundreds of artworks – the heartbeat house included – have been installed across rice fields, beaches, shrines and old houses as part of an unusual project to revitalise ageing communities.

Benesse House Art. Photo: Inside Japan Tours

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Islands of inspiration

TOKYO, Jan. 28 (UPI) — Japan’s revised school teaching manuals will claim the Senkaku Islands and Takeshima islets, which are also claimed by China and South Korea, as part of Japan.

The announcement by Japan’s Education Ministry that its new teaching manuals for junior and senior high schools will describe the islands as “integral parts of Japanese territory” drew protests from China and South Korea, Kyodo News reported.

“It is natural for the state to teach properly about [Japanese] territory,” Japanese Education Minister Hakubun Shimomura told a news conference Tuesday. “With the cooperation of our Foreign Ministry, we will explain the country’s position to our neighbors.”

The Senkaku Islands in the East China, which Japan controls, have become a subject of bitter territorial dispute with China, which calls them Diaoyu.

South Korea similarly claims the Takeshima islets in the Sea of Japan, which it controls. Seoul calls them the Dokdo islets.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying expressed “grave concern” over the Japanese Education Ministry action.

South Koran Foreign Affairs Ministry, in a protest, urged Japan to immediately retract its revision, saying Japan’s claims over Dokdo are groundless as they have always belonged to South Korea.

Kyodo said the revised manuals are not legally binding, although as teaching guidelines, they have much impact in classrooms.

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Japan teaching manuals say disputed islands are country’s territories

TOKYO, Jan. 25 (UPI) — China and South Korea both chastised Japan Friday after Tokyo reiterated its claims on a string of contested islands.

Japanese Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida said in a speech to the parliament that Japan was maintaining its claim on the so-called Dokdo islands in the East China Sea, which prompted a stiff response from the South Koreans and Chinese, who also claim jurisdiction over the tiny islands.

“Such groundless claims and useless attempts repeated over time only show the world that Japan is still under the spell of imperialism,” the South Korean foreign ministry said in a written statement.The ministry said the hard-line attitude of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s government was needlessly belligerent, South Korea’s Yonhap News Agency said.

China currently maintains control of the islands and recently announced the formation of an air-defense identification zone over the region that barred other nations from flying through without permission.

“It is just and legitimate for China to set up the ADIZ, about which Japan is not entitled to criticize,” a Chinese foreign ministry spokesman told Japan’s Kyodo News.

Continued here:
Seoul, Beijing push back on Japan over disputed islands



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By: mikichan1984

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LB WORKS New 35GT-R – LB Performance – Liberty Walk – Tokyo Auto Salon 2104 – Video

Japan is seeking to nationalize 280 remote islands in a move aimed at strengthening the country’s territorial boundaries.

Japanese government officials say nationalizing the islands is intended to clarify the governments protection of its territories and reinforce its management of marine resources and national security, The Japan News reported.

Registering [remote islands] as Japans national assets would send a message that we intend to strengthen management of them Ichita Yamamoto, Japans state minister for oceanic police and territorial issues, said.

The government must accurately grasp the state of these remote islands, Yamamoto said, according to the report.

The move may heighten already strained tensions between Tokyo, China and South Korea, who are currently engaged in territorial disputes over ownership of unclaimed islands in the East China Sea, Reuters reported.

We believe that Japans actions in marine areas should follow international law, and should not harm the interest of other countries or the international community, said Hua Chunying, a spokeswoman of Chinas foreign ministry, according to Reuters.

Earlier in the week, Japan’s Cabinet adopted a national security strategy and revised defense plans that increased defense spending and calls for a larger role in maintaining international stability.

The program includes acquisition of surveillance drones, anti-missile destroyers and other equipment as the country’s defense priorities shift to focus on its dispute with China over uninhabited islands.

The revised defense plans are based on the new national security strategy that reflects Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s drive to raise the profile of Japan’s military and for the country to play a bigger international role.

Experts say the strategy and the defense plans are in line with power shift that has been continuing for several years. But Japan’s neighbors and some Japanese citizens worry that the guidelines push the country away from its pacifist constitution.

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Japan to take over management of 280 remote islands



Chinese Man Crashes Hot-Air Balloon Near Disputed Islands
TOKYO, Jan 2 (Reuters) – A Chinese man landed himself, literally, in the midst of a territorial dispute between Asia's two great powers, crash-landing a hot …

By: World News

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Chinese Man Crashes Hot-Air Balloon Near Disputed Islands – Video

TOKYO: A Chinese man who tried to fly a hot-air balloon hundreds of kilometres to islands disputed between Beijing and Tokyo was rescued by Japans coastguard after ditching in the sea, an official said yesterday.

The 35-year-old took off from Chinas Fujian province on Wednesday morning in an attempt to land on one of the Tokyo-controlled islands, the Japan Coast Guard official said.

It was an ambitious goal hot-air balloons travel largely at the mercy of the wind, and the islands are tiny specks in the East China Sea 359 kilometres away from the take-off point.

They are hotly disputed between Beijing, which regards them as its territory and calls them Diaoyu, and Tokyo, which calls them Senkaku. Tensions have at times reached feverish heights.

In the event the pilot sent a request for help several hours into his flight and ditched in the sea, with a Japanese rescue helicopter picking him up 22 kilometres south of his goal, the official said.

The man, who was unhurt, was handed over to a Chinese patrol ship outside Japanese territorial waters, he added.

Photos distributed by the Japan Coast Guard showed a striped, multicoloured balloon drifting half-deflated in the steely blue waters.

Reports identified the man as Xu Shuaijun, a balloonist who in 2012 became the first man to pilot a hot-air balloon over northeast Chinas Bohai Bay.

On his verified account on Weibo, a Chinese version of Twitter, Xu posted a short message declaring that he had been returned safely to the city of Fuqing in Fujian province.

I have returned safely, Xu wrote. Thanks everyone for your concern.

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Japan rescues balloonist trying to reach islands

AFP Japan rescues Chinese balloonist trying to reach islands

Tokyo (AFP) – A Chinese man who tried to fly a hot-air balloon hundreds of kilometres to islands disputed between Beijing and Tokyo was rescued by Japan’s coastguard after ditching in the sea, an official said Thursday.

The 35-year-old took off from China’s Fujian province on Wednesday morning in an attempt to land on one of the Tokyo-controlled islands, the Japan Coast Guard official said.

It was an ambitious goal — hot-air balloons travel largely at the mercy of the wind, and the islands are tiny specks in the East China Sea 359 kilometres (223 miles) away from the take-off point.

They are hotly disputed between Beijing, which regards them as its territory and calls them Diaoyu, and Tokyo, which calls them Senkaku. Tensions have at times reached feverish heights.

In the event the pilot sent a request for help several hours into his flight and ditched in the sea, with a Japanese rescue helicopter picking him up 22 kilometres south of his goal, the official said.

The man, who was unhurt, was handed over to a Chinese patrol ship outside Japanese territorial waters, he added.

Photos distributed by the Japan Coast Guard showed a striped, multicoloured balloon drifting half-deflated in the steely blue waters.

Reports identified the man as Xu Shuaijun, a balloonist who in 2012 became the first man to pilot a hot-air balloon over northeast China’s Bohai Bay.

On his verified account on Weibo, a Chinese version of Twitter, Xu posted a short message declaring that he had been returned safely to the city of Fuqing in Fujian province.

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Japan rescues Chinese balloonist trying to reach disputed islands

January 01, 2014

China’s reported plan to reorganise its military regions comes amid rising tensions between China and Japan over a chain of uninhabited islands in the East China Sea.China is considering reorganising its seven military regions into five in a bid to respond more swiftly to a crisis, the Japanese daily Yomiuri Shimbun reported today.

The news comes amid rising tensions over Beijing’s territorial claims in the region, with China and Japan squaring off over a chain of uninhabited islands in the East China Sea.

Each of the new military regions will create a joint operations command that controls the army, navy and air force as well as a strategic missile unit, the major daily said citing senior Chinese military officials and other sources.

The planned revamp would mark a shift from the current defence-oriented military that relies mainly on the army to one that ensures more mobile and integrated management of the army, navy, air force and strategic missile units, Yomiuri said.

“It is a proactive measure with eyes on counteracting the Japan-US alliance,” the daily quoted one of the officials as saying.

Tokyo and Beijing are locked in a simmering territorial row over Tokyo-controlled Senkaku Islands in the East China Sea which China also claims and calls the Diaoyus.

The United States, while insisting it does not take sides on sovereignty disputes, has said that the islands are under Tokyo’s management and so come under a security treaty in which it is required to defend officially pacifist Japan against attack.

Under the proposed military structure China aims to strengthen its attack capability to secure air and naval superiority in the South China Sea and the East China Sea, the daily said.

The newspaper also reported that Japan plans to deploy its first “Global Hawk” unmanned surveillance planes at an airbase in Misawa, on the northern tip of Japan’s main Honshu Island, adjacent to a US airbase where the same type of aircraft will be based later this year.

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Canadas first religious freedom ambassador says his job advancing and promoting religious liberty around the globe has an equally important role: to support Canadian diplomats as they work abroad.

Andrew Bennetts vote of confidence in the Canadian foreign service comes despite years of tension between diplomats and the very Conservative government that created his job early last year.

Canadas foreign service is one of the best in the world and diplomats have been working tirelessly for decades in nations where religion plays a critical role in the lives of their citizens and the politics of their governments, Bennett said in a recent interview.

The Canadian foreign service, and Canadians abroad, have been focusing on religious freedom for a long time before I arrived, so really our office is a way to support them in what theyre finding in the countries theyre engaged in, said Bennett, himself a longtime public servant.

Diplomats staged the longest strike in public service history earlier this year in job action that saw them picketing in the streets of Tokyo, Washington, London, Paris, Dublin and beyond. The bitter six-month dispute with the federal government, which ended in September, is estimated to have delivered a $1-billion hit to the economy, particularly in the tourism and education sectors.

Bennett, a 41-year-old Catholic who has considered becoming a priest, says Canadian diplomats far and wide have sent words of encouragement since he was appointed to the job in February.

Ive received nothing but full support of colleagues here in the department and in the missions overseas. Our office is really a tool for them, the lanky Bennett said from his office in Ottawas Lester B. Pearson building, the headquarters of the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development.

One of his aspirations during his three-year stint is to work closely with diplomats to help them develop a nuanced understanding of the issues of religious liberty in the countries where theyre serving, he added.

But his No. 1 goal as Canadas first ambassador of religious freedom?

To ensure that Canada is seen as a world leader in defending religious freedom.

Continue reading here:
Religious freedom chief says he aids diplomats in supporting human rights abroad

By Bill Charles

In a few days the Year of Snake will turn into the Year of Horse, and while the problems surrounding Okinawa are likely to stay the same, theres much to be happy and hopeful about, too.

If Futenma Marine Corps Air Station didnt exist, and if China didnt have its eye on the Senkaku Islands in southwestern Okinawa, 2013 would have been a rather ho-hum year. Alas, the Marine Corps air base is here, and China is sparring with Japan over the five uninhabited islands, making them the years top newsmakers.

Futenma: years of wrangling since 1996 havent produced the deal necessary to shut down the base atop a hill in densely populated Ginowan City, although if ever theres a breakthrough on the horizon, it could come any day. Japan and the United States have picked Camp Schwab and adjacent Oura Bay in the Henoko district of Nago City for the replacement airfield facility, designed a facility that includes a pair of 2,500-meter V-shaped runways extending into the bay, and are waiting for the green light.

The go ahead is now squarely in the hands of Okinawa Governor Hirokazu Nakaima, who has promised to make a decision this month on approving the land reclamation project necessary to transform the airfield from a concept paper to reality. Nakaima has been outspoken that he really wants Futenma out of Okinawa, but political realities come into play here, and he could be hard pressed to say no because of pressures from Tokyo that also include substantial amounts of money being poured into Okinawa in exchange for his support.

With Nakaimas signature, the project moves ahead, although it is expected protests and demonstrations will continue by those who oppose continued use of Okinawa land for American military facilities. The target date for completing the Futenma Replacement Facility is 2022, but Japans defense minister has only this week signaled that Prime Minister Shinzo Abes government would like to expedite the project.

A side note to the Futenma intrigue; much of Okinawas political leadership is with the Liberal Democratic Party, and local officials are much beholden to Tokyo. Okinawas LDP leaders until only weeks ago had been in opposition to the Futenma plan, but following a meeting with the chairman of the LDP, all five Okinawa members of the Diet reversed course and now support the Futenma plan. Nakaima is also a staunch LDP man, and he, too, could be hard pressed to challenge Tokyo, which has been almost literally throwing money at Okinawa Prefecture in exchange for his support. There is the 346 billion for projects, another 33 billion for a second runway at Naha International Airport, and scores of smaller sums.

Senkaku Islands

Japan claims sovereignty over five tiny, isolated islands to the far south of Okinawas main island, the Senkaku Islands, and has administrative control as well as ownership of several of them. Trouble is, China and Taiwan also claim the islands belong to them, and Chinas stirring the pot that the Diaoyu Islands, as they call them, are Chinese. For more than a year, Chinas been sending air reconnaissance aircraft and scores of ships into the zone near the islands, challenging the Japan Coast Guard on numerous occasions.

China upped the ante a couple months ago, imposing a massive Air Defense ID Zone across much of the East China Sea and encompassing the Senkaku Islands. Chinas demanded that all nations respect the zone, and follow Chinese rules for entering it. The United States, Japan and Korea have rebuffed and ignored the Chinese directive, increasing tensions between the worlds economic giants.

Originally posted here:
Futenma, Senkakus provide most memorable moments of 2013

TOKYO: Japan is putting missiles on islands marking the gateway to the Pacific, officials said on Thursday, as part of a huge military drill that has unsettled Beijing.

The exercise, aimed at bolstering Japan’s defence of remote islands, has already seen a launching system and a loader for Type-88 surface-to-ship missiles installed on Miyako island, complete with two missiles.

Four more missiles were due to arrive on the main island of Okinawa later on Thursday. It was not clear how long they would remain in place.

“This is the first time” that missile systems have been taken to Miyako, said a spokesman for the Joint Staff of the Self Defence Forces, adding that the missiles could not be fired in their present state.

“The drill is designed for the defence of islands,” he said.

While the Japanese military makes no secret of the fact these missiles are not operable, observers say their deployment serves to remind anyone watching of Japan’s capabilities.

The Self Defense Forces began their 18 days of war games on November 1, with 34,000 military personnel, six vessels and 360 aircraft.

The exercise comes amid growing nervousness in Japan and other parts of Asia over China’s surging military might, which has seen it expand its naval reach into the Pacific Ocean as it squabbles with Tokyo over the ownership of islands in the East China Sea.

Beijing also has separate disputes with numerous countries over competing claims in the South China Sea. It claims most of the sea as its territory.

Chinese naval assets stationed in the north of the country are somewhat hemmed in by the chain of Japanese islands that separate the East China Sea and the Pacific.

Read more here:
Japan putting missiles on Pacific gateway islands

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa The ruling African National Congress of South Africa demanded an apology Monday after U.S. officials detained and questioned a South African businessman and former government minister in New York last week.

In an embarrassing hangover from the apartheid era, former freedom fighter Tokyo Sexwale was detained because he was on America’s terrorism watch list.

The names of some anti-apartheid activists who opposed the racist system before South Africa’s first democratic elections in 1994 reportedly remain on the U.S. terrorism watch list. The U.S. didn’t remove former President Nelson Mandela from the list until 2008, years after he retired from public life.

Mandela and other ANC leaders were designated “terrorists” during their struggle against apartheid. Sexwale, like Mandela, was part of the ANC’s armed wing and served time as a political prisoner on Robben Island.

Sexwale, one of South African’s richest men, has interests in mining and energy. In 2011, Forbes listed him among 10 African “millionaires to watch.”

The ANC reacted with outrage at his detention and called for an unconditional apology.

“Comrade Tokyo Sexwale is a former minister of a democratic Republic of South Africa, a decorated freedom fighter, activist and leader of our liberation movement, not a terrorist,” the party said in a statement Monday. “The very fact that the government of America continues to view members and leaders of the African National Congress as terrorists is an affront to the global anti-apartheid movement,” the statement said, adding that current President Jacob Zuma was also an ANC freedom fighter during the anti-apartheid struggle.

ANC members were designated as terrorists by the apartheid government and were barred from entry to the U.S. without special permission from the State Department.

In 2008, then-Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice expressed her embarrassment that she had to provide special permission for Mandela to visit the United States. Later that year, the U.S. Congress passed legislation authorizing that rules rendering visitors “inadmissible due to terrorist or criminal activities would not apply with respect to activities undertaken in association with the African National Congress in opposition to apartheid rule in South Africa.”

There was no State Department response to the ANC call for an apology. An email from a department official did not address whether any other senior ANC members remained on the watch list or whether there were plans to remove any ANC officials who remained on the list.

Continue reading here:
South Africa demands apology over U.S. detention of ex-official

China on Monday kept up the pressure on Japan over disputed islands, sending its coastguard to the area following Beijing's weekend mention of “war” after Tokyo reportedly readied to down its drones.

The rest is here:
China coastguard ups pressure in Japan island spat



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