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2012 Statue Of Liberty .999 One Ounce Copper Coin – Video

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Apr 052015
 



2012 Statue Of Liberty .999 One Ounce Copper Coin
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2012 Statue Of Liberty .999 One Ounce Copper Coin – Video

Minecraft wonders of the world Statue of Liberty – Video

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Mar 282015
 



Minecraft wonders of the world Statue of Liberty
Minecraft wonders of the world Statue of Liberty. Location is in Liberty Island in New York, United States (USA). Nyc. It's from base to torch 151 feet (46 meters) and from ground to torch…

By: Tonis Channel

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Minecraft wonders of the world Statue of Liberty – Video

On a ferry passing by the Statue of Liberty! – Video

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Mar 222015
 



On a ferry passing by the Statue of Liberty!
Hey guys! In New York, we passed by Lady Liberty! Gaming Videos coming soon! Enjoy!

By: Icey Dude

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On a ferry passing by the Statue of Liberty! – Video

A-335 Statue of Liberty Style Protective PC + Sili – Video

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Mar 182015
 



A-335 Statue of Liberty Style Protective PC + Sili
A-335 Statue of Liberty Style Protective PC + Silicone Case for Iphone 5 / 5s – Pink + Deep Pink :(discount coupon and…

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A-335 Statue of Liberty Style Protective PC + Sili – Video

Let’s Draw the Statue of Liberty! – Video

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Mar 162015
 



Let's Draw the Statue of Liberty!
Easy to follow directions, using right brain drawing techniques, showing how to draw the Statue of Liberty.

By: pattyfernandezartist

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Let’s Draw the Statue of Liberty! – Video

The Statue Of Liberty In A Gangs Atmosphere – National Geographic Documentary – Video

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Mar 122015
 



The Statue Of Liberty In A Gangs Atmosphere – National Geographic Documentary
More Video At: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpojaFfNeaVdoDSNb3k-_JA?sub_confirmation=1 This is my favourite documentary. I want to share it with you. *————Like———-Share———…

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The Statue Of Liberty In A Gangs Atmosphere – National Geographic Documentary – Video

Avoid working on the Statue of Liberty! – Video

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Mar 072015
 



Avoid working on the Statue of Liberty!
Here I share with you one of 37 books I have on the Statue of Liberty! This one is fun, as well as informative giving a basic introduction on how the Statue of Liberty was built in France,…

By: Lady Libs

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Avoid working on the Statue of Liberty! – Video

Travellers passing the Statue of Liberty over a century ago – Video

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Mar 062015
 



Travellers passing the Statue of Liberty over a century ago
Travellers passing the Statue of Liberty over a century ago Footage from 1913 of travellers passing the Statue of Liberty in New York Have you ever wondered what New York City looked like…

By: kesarladoo

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Travellers passing the Statue of Liberty over a century ago – Video

Boise State Golf Statue of Liberty – Video

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Mar 012015
 



Boise State Golf Statue of Liberty
The Boise State Women's Golf Team is entering a trick-shot contest! You've seen our football team run the Statue of Liberty, but have you seen the golf team …

By: Mckenzie Ford

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Boise State Golf Statue of Liberty – Video

Top 10 Amazing Facts About the Statue of Liberty – Video

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Feb 102015
 



Top 10 Amazing Facts About the Statue of Liberty
Top 10 Amazing Facts About the Statue of Liberty The Statue was presented as a gift to commemorate the centennial of the Declaration of Independence, and as a symbol of the friendship forged…

By: ListMania

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Top 10 Amazing Facts About the Statue of Liberty – Video

Statue of Liberty – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Feb 072015
 

Statue of Liberty Location Liberty Island Manhattan, New York City, New York[1] Coordinates 404121N 74240W / 40.68917N 74.04444W / 40.68917; -74.04444Coordinates: 404121N 74240W / 40.68917N 74.04444W / 40.68917; -74.04444 Height Base to torch: 151feet 1inch (46 meters) Ground to torch: 305feet 1inch (93 meters) Dedicated October 28, 1886 Restored 1938, 19841986, 20112012 Sculptor Frdric Auguste Bartholdi Visitation 3.2million (in 2009)[2] Governing body U.S. National Park Service Type Cultural Criteria i, vi Designated 1984 (8th session) Referenceno. 307 State Party United States Region Europe and North America Designated October 15, 1924 Designated by President Calvin Coolidge[3] Official name: Statue of Liberty National Monument, Ellis Island and Liberty Island Designated October 15, 1966[4] Referenceno. 66000058 Designated May 27, 1971 Referenceno. 1535[5] Type Individual Designated September 14, 1976[6]

The Statue of Liberty (Liberty Enlightening the World; French: La Libert clairant le monde) is a colossal neoclassical sculpture on Liberty Island in New York Harbor in New York City, in the United States. The statue, designed by Frdric Auguste Bartholdi, a French sculptor and dedicated on October 28, 1886, was a gift to the United States from the people of France. The statue is of a robed female figure representing Libertas, the Roman goddess of freedom, who bears a torch and a tabula ansata (a tablet evoking the law) upon which is inscribed the date of the American Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776. A broken chain lies at her feet. The statue is an icon of freedom and of the United States: a welcoming signal to immigrants arriving from abroad.

Bartholdi was inspired by French law professor and politician douard Ren de Laboulaye, who is said to have commented in 1865 that any monument raised to American independence would properly be a joint project of the French and American peoples. He may have been minded to honor the Union victory in the American Civil War and the end of slavery. Due to the troubled political situation in France, work on the statue did not commence until the early 1870s. In 1875, Laboulaye proposed that the French finance the statue and the Americans provide the site and build the pedestal. Bartholdi completed the head and the torch-bearing arm before the statue was fully designed, and these pieces were exhibited for publicity at international expositions.

The torch-bearing arm was displayed at the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia in 1876, and in Madison Square Park in Manhattan from 1876 to 1882. Fundraising proved difficult, especially for the Americans, and by 1885 work on the pedestal was threatened due to lack of funds. Publisher Joseph Pulitzer of the New York World started a drive for donations to complete the project that attracted more than 120,000contributors, most of whom gave less than a dollar. The statue was constructed in France, shipped overseas in crates, and assembled on the completed pedestal on what was then called Bedloe’s Island. The statue’s completion was marked by New York’s first ticker-tape parade and a dedication ceremony presided over by President Grover Cleveland.

The statue was administered by the United States Lighthouse Board until 1901 and then by the Department of War; since 1933 it has been maintained by the National Park Service. The statue was closed for renovation for much of 1938. In the early 1980s, it was found to have deteriorated to such an extent that a major restoration was required. While the statue was closed from 1984 to 1986, the torch and a large part of the internal structure were replaced. After the September 11 attacks in 2001, it was closed for reasons of safety and security; the pedestal reopened in 2004 and the statue in 2009, with limits on the number of visitors allowed to ascend to the crown. The statue, including the pedestal and base, was closed for a year until October 28, 2012, so that a secondary staircase and other safety features could be installed; Liberty Island remained open. However, one day after the reopening, Liberty Island closed due to the effects of Hurricane Sandy in New York; the statue and island opened again on July 4, 2013. Public access to the balcony surrounding the torch has been barred for safety reasons since 1916.

The origin of the Statue of Liberty project is sometimes traced to a comment made by French law professor and politician douard Ren de Laboulaye in mid-1865. In after-dinner conversation at his home near Versailles, Laboulaye, an ardent supporter of the Union in the American Civil War, is supposed to have said: “If a monument should rise in the United States, as a memorial to their independence, I should think it only natural if it were built by united efforta common work of both our nations.” The National Park Service, in a 2000 report, however, deemed this a legend traced to an 1885 fundraising pamphlet, and that the statue was most likely conceived in 1870.[8] In another essay on their website, the Park Service suggested that Laboulaye was minded to honor the Union victory and its consequences, “With the abolition of slavery and the Union’s victory in the Civil War in 1865, Laboulaye’s wishes of freedom and democracy were turning into a reality in the United States. In order to honor these achievements, Laboulaye proposed that a gift be built for the United States on behalf of France. Laboulaye hoped that by calling attention to the recent achievements of the United States, the French people would be inspired to call for their own democracy in the face of a repressive monarchy.”[9]

According to sculptor Frdric Auguste Bartholdi, who later recounted the story, Laboulaye’s comment was not intended as a proposal, but it inspired Bartholdi. Given the repressive nature of the regime of Napoleon III, Bartholdi took no immediate action on the idea except to discuss it with Laboulaye. Bartholdi was in any event busy with other possible projects; in the late 1860s, he approached Isma’il Pasha, Khedive of Egypt, with a plan to build a huge lighthouse in the form of an ancient Egyptian female fellah or peasant, robed and holding a torch aloft, at the northern entrance to the Suez Canal in Port Said. Sketches and models were made of the proposed work, though it was never erected. There was a classical precedent for the Suez proposal, the Colossus of Rhodes: an ancient bronze statue of the Greek god of the sun, Helios. This statue is believed to have been over 100 feet (30m) high, and it similarly stood at a harbor entrance and carried a light to guide ships.

Any large project was further delayed by the Franco-Prussian War, in which Bartholdi served as a major of militia. In the war, Napoleon III was captured and deposed. Bartholdi’s home province of Alsace was lost to the Prussians, and a more liberal republic was installed in France. As Bartholdi had been planning a trip to the United States, he and Laboulaye decided the time was right to discuss the idea with influential Americans. In June 1871, Bartholdi crossed the Atlantic, with letters of introduction signed by Laboulaye.

Arriving at New York Harbor, Bartholdi focused on Bedloe’s Island as a site for the statue, struck by the fact that vessels arriving in New York had to sail past it. He was delighted to learn that the island was owned by the United States governmentit had been ceded by the New York State Legislature in 1800 for harbor defense. It was thus, as he put it in a letter to Laboulaye: “land common to all the states.” As well as meeting many influential New Yorkers, Bartholdi visited President Ulysses S. Grant, who assured him that it would not be difficult to obtain the site for the statue. Bartholdi crossed the United States twice by rail, and met many Americans he felt would be sympathetic to the project. But he remained concerned that popular opinion on both sides of the Atlantic was insufficiently supportive of the proposal, and he and Laboulaye decided to wait before mounting a public campaign.

Bartholdi had made a first model of his concept in 1870. The son of a friend of Bartholdi’s, American artist John LaFarge, later maintained that Bartholdi made the first sketches for the statue during his U.S. visit at La Farge’s Rhode Island studio. Bartholdi continued to develop the concept following his return to France. He also worked on a number of sculptures designed to bolster French patriotism after the defeat by the Prussians. One of these was the Lion of Belfort, a monumental sculpture carved in sandstone below the fortress of Belfort, which during the war had resisted a Prussian siege for over three months. The defiant lion, 73 feet (22m) long and half that in height, displays an emotional quality characteristic of Romanticism, which Bartholdi would later bring to the Statue of Liberty.

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Statue of Liberty – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

N.J. lawmakers to revise law affecting Liberty State Park

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Feb 072015
 

TRENTON – A bill that opponents feared would open the door to the privatization and commercialization of Liberty State Park was signed into law by Gov. Christie on Thursday, but it is expected to be revised soon by new legislation to protect the site.

The measure’s sponsors, Assembly Speaker Vincent Prieto and State Sen. Paul Sarlo, said in a statement that they would write legislation to address concerns about development of the site, a popular gateway to the Statue of Liberty.

Christie says the law will help make government smaller and more affordable by merging two agencies – the Meadowlands Commission and the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority – into the new Meadowlands Regional Commission.

That commission, according to the law, “shall evaluate, approve, and implement any plans for Liberty State Park.”

Prieto (D., Bergen) and Sarlo (D., Bergen) on Thursday tried to allay those fears by offering to tweak the law.

“Liberty State Park and what it means to our heritage holds a special place, and, as has always been the case, we will stand ready to protect the park,” Prieto and Sarlo said in a statement.

“To that end, we will be introducing legislation to clarify that the Meadowlands Regional Commission may only review plans for Liberty State Park at the request of the Department of Environmental Protection, and that nothing in state law shall be construed to transfer ownership of any Liberty State Park property to the commission or anyone else,” they said.

Though having unspecified issues with the bill, Christie signed it based on bipartisan negotiations and agreement with Prieto and Sarlo, according to a statement from his office.

“Though this legislation is imperfect in its current form, I believe it is important that we act to move forward with this commonsense consolidation of government to deliver savings to New Jersey taxpayers while we move forward with bipartisan agreement to address concerns with the current bill,” Christie said.

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N.J. lawmakers to revise law affecting Liberty State Park

Amid furor, N.J. lawmakers to revise law affecting Liberty State Park

 Liberty  Comments Off on Amid furor, N.J. lawmakers to revise law affecting Liberty State Park
Feb 052015
 

TRENTON A bill that opponents feared would open the door to the privatization and commercialization of Liberty State Park was signed into law by Gov. Christie on Thursday but is expected to soon be revised by new legislation to protect the site.

The measure’s sponsors, Assembly Speaker Vincent Prieto and state Sen. Paul Sarlo, said in a statement that they will write new legislation to address concerns about development of the site, a popular gateway to the Statue of Liberty.

Christie says the law will help make government smaller and more affordable by merging two agencies – the Meadowlands Commission and the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority – into the new Meadowlands Regional Commission.

That commission, according to the law, “shall evaluate, approve, and implement any plans for Liberty State Park.”

But Park supporters and environmental groups worry that kind of language paves the way for intrusive development at the park.

So Prieto (D., Bergen, Hudson) and Sarlo (D., Bergen, Passaic) on Thursday tried to assuage their fears by offering to tweak the law.

“Liberty State Park and what it means to our heritage holds a special place, and, as has always been the case, we will stand ready to protect the park,” Prieto and Sarlo said in a statement.

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Amid furor, N.J. lawmakers to revise law affecting Liberty State Park

George Evans – Restoration of the Statue of Liberty – Video

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Feb 012015
 



George Evans – Restoration of the Statue of Liberty
January 10, 2015 Speaker: Mr. George Evans Mr. Evans was on the crew that performed the most recent restoration of the Statue of Liberty. He goes through slides and discusses the work that…

By: COGWA Dallas

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George Evans – Restoration of the Statue of Liberty – Video

Walk Around Las Vegas Strip NY NY, MGM, Statue of Liberty, – Video

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Jan 202015
 



Walk Around Las Vegas Strip NY NY, MGM, Statue of Liberty,
Walk around Las Vegas Strip New York New York, MGM, Excalibur, Statue of Liberty, In front of New York New York Hotel across from the MGM. corner of Las Vegas Strip and Tropicana Blvd.Tropicana.

By: John Cortes

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Walk Around Las Vegas Strip NY NY, MGM, Statue of Liberty, – Video




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