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Remediation Plan

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (WSAZ) — Freedom Industries has submitted it’s remediation plan for the site of the leak that happened in January.

The MCHM and PPH leak into the Elk River led to a no use ban for thousands of West Virginia American Water customers in nine counties.

The plan, developed by Pennsylvania-based Civil & Environmental Consultants, addresses the environmental conditions at the spill site.

According to a press release from the WVDEP, the plan includes a summary of water quality sampling and remedial measures that Freedom Industries has already implemented at the spill site. The plan also provides a schedule of activities, including site characterization and remediation of impacted soils and groundwater, which will begin once tank removal on the property’s northern end, where much of the contamination occurred, is complete.

Tank 396, which leaked the chemicals, is located on the northern end of the Freedom site, according to the DEP. Preliminary information has indicated that the primary flow path of the chemicals from Tank 396 was to the north, where a culvert pipe and cobble fill provided the transport mechanism from the secondary containment area to the Elk River.

It is noted in the plan that remedial options described are preliminary and “presumptive” in nature and can change based on information obtained as part of the site characterization. According to the plan, “Despite these variables, it is important to note that the remedial options ultimately selected will be designed to achieve the overall objective of remediating the site to eliminate current and future threats to human health and the environment related to the MCHM release.”

Freedom Industries will submit a final remedial investigation report once enough information is available to clearly identify the extent of environmental impacts at the site.

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Freedom Industries Releases Spill Site Cleanup Plan

Remediation Plan

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (WSAZ) — Freedom Industries has submitted it’s remediation plan for the site of the leak that happened in January.

The MCHM and PPH leak into the Elk River led to a no use ban for thousands of West Virginia American Water customers in nine counties.

The plan, developed by Pennsylvania-based Civil & Environmental Consultants, addresses the environmental conditions at the spill site.

According to a press release from the WVDEP, the plan includes a summary of water quality sampling and remedial measures that Freedom Industries has already implemented at the spill site. The plan also provides a schedule of activities, including site characterization and remediation of impacted soils and groundwater, which will begin once tank removal on the property’s northern end, where much of the contamination occurred, is complete.

Tank 396, which leaked the chemicals, is located on the northern end of the Freedom site, according to the DEP. Preliminary information has indicated that the primary flow path of the chemicals from Tank 396 was to the north, where a culvert pipe and cobble fill provided the transport mechanism from the secondary containment area to the Elk River.

It is noted in the plan that remedial options described are preliminary and “presumptive” in nature and can change based on information obtained as part of the site characterization. According to the plan, “Despite these variables, it is important to note that the remedial options ultimately selected will be designed to achieve the overall objective of remediating the site to eliminate current and future threats to human health and the environment related to the MCHM release.”

Freedom Industries will submit a final remedial investigation report once enough information is available to clearly identify the extent of environmental impacts at the site.

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Freedom Industries Releases Spill Site Remediation Plan



THE ISLANDS Of RIVER WILDERNESS – ACTIVITIES
http://theislandsofrw.com/

By: Kent Greene

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THE ISLANDS Of RIVER WILDERNESS – ACTIVITIES – Video

Making the Saginaw Bay region beaches available for community members is a high priority for local Great Lakes restoration organizations.

State and federal legislative representatives came together Friday to discuss the future of the Great Lakes during Central Michigan Universitys symposium.

Weekly, we would receive phone calls about beach access and water levels, said Kyle Bostwick, the Shiawasee Sub-Watershed director for the Partnership for the Saginaw Bay Watershed and chief of staff for State Rep. Charles Brunner, D-Bay City. Weve come a long way. There were 37 beaches closed on a regular basis, and now were down to five.

Bostwick said there are multiple groups in the area that are working to keep the area safe for recreation, but organizing the groups had been difficult in the past.

There are 18 organizations alone to better the Cass River, he said. We are very lucky to have Central Michigan University, Grand Valley State University and many others working with these organizations to better these rivers.

Preservation of the Great Lakes and the rivers in the area has been a main focus for many organizations like the Department of Natural Resources and the Department of Environmental Quality. Bostwick said he believes providing access to the beaches and rivers is just as important.

We spend all this time and resources on preserving it that we forget about access to these beaches, he said. You have to drive all the way to Tawas to see a beach without muck. We have to provide access. That should be our primary goal.

Bostwick said the Partnership for the Saginaw Bay Watershed was just granted permission to clean 1,000 feet of beaches and build a boardwalk. He said this was a small step in the process of cleaning hundreds of miles of shoreline for the public to access.

Others at the symposium were worried about the Enbridge Energy Partners LP sunken pipeline in the Straits of Mackinac. Ryan Tarrant, district director for U.S. Rep. Dave Camp, R-Midland, said the representative has asked the company to evaluate the structure and integrity of the pipeline.

The pipeline, which carries more than 23 million gallons of crude oil through the area daily, can be shut off in case of a leak by a valve, according to the company.

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State, federal officials discuss future of the Great Lakes

HONIARA, Solomon Islands Flash floods in the Solomon Islands have killed 14 people and left thousands more homeless.

Government spokesman George Herming said Saturday that the death toll could rise further, with many people listed as missing. He said as many as 15,000 people have had their homes destroyed or made uninhabitable.

The South Pacific island nation is home to 600,000 people.

Herming said there were several days of rain before the Mataniko River in the capital, Honiara, burst its banks Thursday and flooded low-lying settlements alongside the river.

He said the flooding continued through Friday, and waters began to gradually recede Saturday.

New Zealand’s government has pledged 300,000 New Zealand dollars ($258,000) to the relief effort.

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Solomon Islands flooding kills 14 people and leaves thousands more homeless

The West Australian

Perth’s beaches and riverfront may be among the best in the world – but visitors want more.

As a result, the Tourism Council’s strategy to boost tourism numbers, released this week, has recommended that the city’s beachside accommodation be improved and a greater focus be given to evening activities on the beach and riverfront.

“Water sports in Fremantle, diving at Rottnest Island, deep sea fishing off Hillarys, swimming at Rockingham, dolphins in Mandurah and Swan River cruises are classic Perth experiences,” the report said.

“But discerning locals and visitors are always in search of some extra comfort and amenity.”

The report said facilities at landmark beaches such as Scarborough and Cottesloe had fallen behind their local and national counterparts. Both needed improved infrastructure and management to “realise their potential as major attractions for the local community and beyond”.

This should include boardwalks, seating, shade and play spaces.

“Similarly, local icons Rottnest Island and Fremantle each require sustained investment in visitor infrastructure to enable them to remain competitive in a global market,” the report said.

“For Fremantle, accelerating the revitalisation of Victoria Quay and the passenger terminal to incorporate a high-quality arrival and departure experience is essential for the 450,000 to 550,000 visitors who pass through each year.

“For Rottnest Island, a luxury accommodation option is fundamental to re-engage high yield locals and the lucrative Asian market.”

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Our beaches are great but 'still lacking'

Argentinas tax agency head is meeting FIFA President Sepp Blatter today to tell him how soccer teams are evading taxes in the $3.7 billion player trading market.

Ricardo Echegaray has traveled to the soccer ruling bodys headquarters in Zurich to inform Blatter that his agency has detected techniques used by clubs to direct transfers through sporting tax havens, the tax office said in an e-mailed statement.

The visit comes a week after FIFA said it fined four Argentine clubs for trading players through a Uruguayan team for reasons that were not of a sporting nature.

Argentinas tax agency has been in touch with FIFA previously. In 2012 it wrote to the soccer body to say players from that country were being traded through seven clubs in Uruguay and two in Chile to avoid paying higher tax rates at home, and that sometimes the transfer fees passed through offshore companies.

The agency said at the time that the transfer fees were split between the player, his agent and investors who owned his transfer rights. Argentina is among the biggest exporter of soccer players in the world yet many of its teams are indebted as clubs receive just a fraction of the amount raised from sales.

Deportivo Maldonado SAD, a team in Uruguays second tier with average attendances of about 200, and led by a group of U.K. businessmen, earned $14 million since 2011 through trading players who never played for it. Officials there say they abide with FIFAs regulations and local laws.

In 2012, the Argentine tax authorities published details of how defender Jonathan Bottinelli was transferred between Argentine clubs San Lorenzo and River Plate via Union San Felipe, a Chilean team for which hed never played. The $1.7 million fee was deposited in a Miami bank account, according to the paperwork.

To contact the reporters on this story: Tariq Panja in Rio de Janeiro at tpanja@bloomberg.net; Alex Duff in Madrid at aduff4@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Christopher Elser at celser@bloomberg.net Peter-Joseph Hegarty

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Argentine Official Meets FIFAs Blatter on Soccer Tax Avoidance

The president of the company responsible for the Jan. 9 chemical leak has asked a judge to let him get paid during the company’s bankruptcy case.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — The president of the company responsible for the Jan. 9 chemical leak has asked a judge to let him get paid during the company’s bankruptcy case.

Gary Southern said, in a filing in U.S. Bankruptcy Court on Saturday, that he hasn’t gotten paid since Jan. 19. The company, Freedom Industries, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy Jan. 18. Chapter 11 allows a company to reorganize and continue operating, but its attorney has said the company is winding down.

Southern said in his filing that he worked between 12 and 16 hours a day for 46 consecutive days — from Jan. 10, the day after the spill, to Feb. 26. Since March 3, he said, he has worked 10 to 12 hours a day Monday through Friday.

He has had to attend daily meetings with state and federal officials conducting investigations into the leak. Southern also must continue talks with vendors, according to the court documents.

Southern became president of Freedom on Jan. 1, at an annual salary of $230,000. He is asking U.S. District Court Judge Ronald Pearson to pay him until a chief restructuring officer is appointed to the case.

Crude MCHM leaked from the company’s tank farm on Barlow Drive into the Elk River on Jan. 9, fouling the drinking water of 300,000 West Virginians.

Earlier this month, Pearson approved Freedom’s request to hire a company to help collect and preserve its electronic documents, and respond to requests from the state Department of Environmental Protection in its daily site supervision.

The documents from current and former Freedom officials must be collected to comply with subpoenas issued by U.S. Attorney Booth Goodwin’s office and other agencies investigating the company.

There are about 240 unsecured creditors to whom Freedom owes money. Many of the unsecured creditors are those who filed lawsuits against the company before its bankruptcy filing. There are at least 30 lawsuits against Freedom.

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Freedom president asks court to get paid



GUSTAVE RIVER KING, “WAR and WAR”, Freedom fight HD 1080p Video Sharing
GUSTAVE RIVER KING IN LIVE CONCERT SOME WHERE IN THE WORLD.

By: gustave river king

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GUSTAVE RIVER KING, "WAR and WAR", Freedom fight HD 1080p Video Sharing – Video

The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection has approved the first phase of the tank decommission plan of Freedom Industries’ Charleston facility where MCHM and other chemicals spilled into the Elk River Jan. 9, spoiling the water for 300,000 people in parts of nine southern West Virginia counties.

The plan was prepared by Civil & Environmental Consultants Inc., a company from Export, PA., and details the order of activities, procedures and safeguards workers will use to begin removing the above-ground storage tanks at the facility.

Freedom was ordered to begin the process of dismantling, removing and properly disposing of all of its above-ground storage tanks, as well as the associated piping and machinery at the Elk River site. The 14-page plan outlines dust control, stormwater management, precautions in case of spills or releases and regulatory compliance.

None of the materials stored in the tanks are considered “hazardous waste” under either West Virginia or federal law. The DEP has indicated that the odors associated with MCHM will again be present as construction activities at the plant intensify.

According to the DEP, most of the tanks’ liquid inventory has been removed, with the exception of tank heel in a number of the above-ground storage tanks. Tank heel is the product that remains in the bottom of storage tanks because it can’t be removed through the normal pumping procedures.

Freedom Industries conducted an asbestos survey to facilitate the demolition of the tanks and associated infrastructure. The company also will start a lead-based paint assessment study.

According to the tank decommission plan, contractors will first begin removing tanks at the north end of the property. Workers already have cut a hole in tank No. 393, the tank responsible for the Jan. 9 leak. It will be cleaned and sandblasted by the Chemical Safety Board. Contractors will remove the floor section of the tank, and it will be retained by the CSB.

To protect area water, liner materials that cannot be penetrated will be used to cover the areas exposed during tank removal operations, according to the DEP, and workers also must take all necessary steps to prevent spills or releases to the ground or the Elk River.

Freedom Industries is required to give a 48-hour notice to WVDEP representatives as well as representatives for litigation parties and counsel for the Unsecured Creditors Committee prior to entering into a demolition contract and commencing field work at the Elk River facility.

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Freedom Industries submits first part of its decommission plan

Freedom Decommissioning Plan

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (WSAZ) — The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection has released Freedom Industries’ demolition plan for the site of the January 9 chemical spill.

The Plan, which has been approved by the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection was prepared for Freedom Industries by Civil & Environmental Consultants Inc., out of Export, Pa.

It details the order of activities, accompanying procedures and safeguards workers will use to begin the removal of above ground storage tanks (ASTs) at the facility, including tank No. 396 that leaked an estimated 10,000 gallons of MCHM and another chemical, PPH.

In January, Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin ordered Freedom to begin dismantling, removing and properly disposing of all ASTs, as well as associated piping and machinery at the Elk River site by March 15.

The governor’s directive was included in Consent Order 8034 issued by the WVDEP and signed by Freedom Industries.

To comply with that order, Freedom Industries has begun the process of decommissioning and cleaning its tanks for demolition. Most of the tanks’ liquid inventory has been removed, with the exception of tank heel in a number of the ASTs. Tank heel is the product that remains in the bottom of storage tanks because it can’t be removed through the normal pumping procedures.

Freedom Industries also has conducted an asbestos survey to facilitate the demolition of the tanks and the associated infrastructure and will initiate a lead-based paint assessment in association with the ASTs.

According to the Tank Decommission Plan, contractors will first begin removing ASTs on the north end of the Freedom Industries’ property, near the faulty tank No. 396. Workers have already cut a hole in Tank No. 393, located on the far north end of the site, to remove the tank heel. Tank No. 396 will be cleaned and sandblasted by the Chemical Safety Board (CSB). Contractors will remove the floor section of the tank, which will be retained by the CSB.

During tank removal, steps will be taken to control dust and other airborne emissions from the property. No on-site burning will be permitted. It is likely that MCHM odors associated with the site will increase as construction activities intensify at Freedom Industries.

Originally posted here:
WVDEP Updates Freedom Cleanup Plan

Youre at Victoria Park in Ontario, preparing to swing from an 80-foot cliff and fly 200 feet across Elora Gorge before rappelling down to the river like a human spider.

Your guide asks you to pick a rope.

Would you ask for the cheapest rope or the strongest?

Will you look for the shortest length or one long enough to reach the ground?

Obvious, right?

Yet, business owners rarely apply the same logic when it comes to making business decisions. They look for the cheapest SEO solutions, wanting to pay the lowest hourly rate, for the fewest hours just to save a few dollars.

Their business, not surprisingly, is left dangling in mid-air with no way to land safely!

Asking how much SEO costs isnt logical. Its the wrong question. The same goes for comparing SEO services on a price-per-hour basis. After all, when it comes to search engine optimization, there is no such thing as a one size fits all solution.

In order to help your business leverage search traffic optimally, SEO consultants must first understand your business and your goals or targets. They will have to:

Only then can they begin to develop a strategic SEO plan designed to rocket your business website to the front page of Google.

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Why You Shouldnt Worry About SEO Costs But Focus On What It Earns



Homes for Sale – 1700 N Willamette Rd., Liberty Lake, WA
Property Site: http://tour.circlepix.com/home/99PPU8 Wonderful townhome with all the bells and whistles – located in the River District area at Liberty Lake….

By: EasternUnder250k

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Homes for Sale – 1700 N Willamette Rd., Liberty Lake, WA – Video

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — The owner of a company hired by Freedom Industries to clean up its tank farm on the Elk River wouldn’t say Sunday if federal investigators removed guns from his company’s property last week.

Daniel Carlton Kessler said that he had no idea why dozens of federal agents showed up at Diversified Services LLC on Thursday. The company, which has also hauled chemicals for Freedom Industries in the past, is under federal investigation, and has a history of environmental complaints filed against it.

U.S. Attorney Booth Goodwin, who is conducting a criminal investigation into the leak at Freedom Industries, also wouldn’t say why FBI agents were at Diversified Services.

Cecelia Sanson owns CJ’s Auto Sales and other property next to Diversified Services, at 110 Virginia St. in St. Albans. Sanson and her family have filed complaints for years with the state Department of Environmental Protection about chemical leaks and odors coming from Diversified, which Kessler founded in 2010.

Sanson said she saw federal agents confiscating a gun from Diversified Services on Thursday.

She didn’t know what kind of gun it was, but thought it was a rifle.

“It was more like something you’d see in war,” Sanson said of the gun. “I don’t know my guns but I do know it was a real long gun. You could knock a rabbit in the head instead of having to shoot it.

“[Kessler's] wife jumped out of the truck and yelled, ‘Hey, that’s my husband’s gun.’”

Asked if investigators took guns from his property, Kessler referred comment to his lawyer, whom he did not identify.

In 1995, Kessler pleaded guilty to misdemeanor assault and battery in the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County in Annapolis, Md., according to court records and a court official. He pleaded to that charge in exchange for the state dropping four other charges, including assault with intent to murder and reckless endangerment.

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Feds took gun from Freedom cleanup company, neighbor says



Future Islands – Inch of Dust – Haw River Ballroom
via YouTube Capture.

By: scottnumbers

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Future Islands – Inch of Dust – Haw River Ballroom – Video

A bankruptcy judge approved a request from Freedom Industries on Tuesday to hire a company to help collect and preserve its electronic documents, like cell phones and emails.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — A bankruptcy judge approved a request from Freedom Industries on Tuesday to hire a company to help collect and preserve its electronic documents, like cell phones and emails.

The documents from current and former Freedom officials must be collected to comply with subpoenas issued by U.S. Attorney Booth Goodwin’s office and other agencies investigating the company after a Jan. 9 chemical leak into the Elk River fouled the drinking water of 300,000 West Virginians, an attorney for the company said.

Freedom will pay Vestige an estimated $42,500 to collect, restore, catalog and preserve the evidence, according to Steve Thompson, an attorney for the company.

Freedom filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy on Jan. 17. Chapter 11 allows a company to reorganize and continue operating, but during a hearing last month, Freedom’s attorney said the company would soon shut down.

Goodwin is conducting a criminal investigation of the leak. The U.S. Chemical Safety Board also is examining the incident.

Vestige has already started collecting the evidence, Thompson told U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Ronald Pearson.

“They started, I believe, when the subpoenas were first issued by the U.S. Attorney’s office,” Thompson said.

A federal grand jury in Beckley started meeting about the leak in January, officials have said. Federal hazardous materials investigators in January climbed into the tank where the leak occurred.

A tank at the company’s Barlow Drive location leaked Crude MCHM, a coal-cleaning chemical, into the river. The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection is overseeing the cleanup, which is being carried out by Freedom Industries and contractors for the chemical company.

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Judge approves Freedom evidence-collection request

What has seemed inevitable for weeks was made official today: Freedom Industries will soon be finished as a company.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — What has seemed inevitable for weeks was made official today: Freedom Industries will soon be finished as a company.

Mark Freedlander, a lawyer representing Freedom, told U.S. Bankruptcy Court Friday morning that the company responsible for contaminating the water of 300,000 West Virginians will wind up its affairs — including environmental remediation — and then begin sending all its customers to its former competitors.

That will happen “sooner rather than later,” Freedlander said.

All of Freedom’s remaining chemical inventory will be sold in a matter of days, he said.

“It just became apparent in relatively short order,” Freedlander said, “that it was not practical or financially viable” to continue operating the company.

Freedom was represented at Friday’s bankruptcy hearing only by its lawyers. No company executives attended.

In a news release issued after the hearing, Gary Southern, Freedom’s president, said that selling the company’s inventory and shifting its business to competitors “represents Freedom’s best opportunity to generate funds it needs for our environmental remediation efforts.”

Southern said the company would do its best to help its employees find jobs with competitors, although job losses were inevitable.

In late January, Freedom agreed to an order from the state Department of Environmental Protection to begin tearing down its facility on the Elk River by March 15.

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Freedom Industries to shut down sooner rather than later

Freedom Industries, the company responsible for the Jan. 9 chemical leak that left 300,000 people in Southern West Virginia unable to use their tap water for several days, announced Feb. 21 it is “shifting its sales and service support to other providers, exhausting its existing inventories and pledging to assist displaced employees.”

The announcement came from Gary Southern, president of Freedom Industries, and went on to say the move was “in an effort to maximize resources for its top priority of environmental clean-up,” at its Elk River facility where the Jan. 9 leak occurred.

Southern said the strategy “represents Freedom’s best opportunity to generate funds it needs for our environmental remediation efforts.”

The company filed for bankruptcy Jan. 17.

Southern said the company’s moves will provide “clarity for Freedom’s customers with whom Freedom will work diligently to assist in transitioning to alternate sources of supply.”

“Freedom is committed to continuing to assess its strategic options going forward, taking into account what is best for the state of West Virginia, the people and businesses who call it home, our customers and creditors and all others affected by the case,” Southern said in the announcement.

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Freedom Industries announces it will shift its sales and service support

Feb 202014

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — In the year before it filed for bankruptcy, Freedom Industries paid more than $6 million to its former owners and to companies affiliated with its current owners, court filings show.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — In the year before it filed for bankruptcy, Freedom Industries paid more than $6 million to its former owners and to companies affiliated with its current owners, court filings show.

These payments to what bankruptcy law calls “insiders” will be closely examined by Freedom’s creditors and could be ordered returned to the company if they’re deemed improper, bankruptcy lawyers said.

“It is a red flag,” said Bob Simons, a bankruptcy lawyer with the Pittsburgh firm Reed Smith. “Any transfer within a year, to even as much as four years before the bankruptcy, can be scrutinized to see if those transfers should be returned to the bankruptcy estate.”

Simons added that it is good that Freedom is being forthcoming and not trying to hide the payments.

He said if the transfers were made when the company was insolvent, or they helped make the company insolvent, then they could be “clawed back.”

“The distinguishing feature of this case is that the spill arguably was unforeseen, so how do you plan for it?” Simons said. “You could argue that, if you transferred a lot of the money out of the company, you left it with unreasonably small capital. It would be tough to establish that, because this was an unforeseen liability, but I must say, not impossible under the right circumstances.”

Freedom, which contaminated thousands of West Virginians’ water with a chemical leak into the Elk River on Jan. 9, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy on Jan. 17. Under the bankruptcy code, Chapter 11 permits a company to reorganize and continue operating.

Three men identified as former owners of Freedom — Dennis Farrell, Charles Herzing and William Tis — all received at least $180,000 from Freedom in the year before the chemical leak.

Farrell, who remains with Freedom but no longer is an owner, received more than $288,000 in 33 “withdrawals or distributions” from the company in the past year, according to bankruptcy filings.

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Freedom payments a red flag

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — Freedom Industries had $16 million in assets and $6 million in liabilities when it filed for bankruptcy last month, according to documents filed Monday.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — Freedom Industries had $16 million in assets and $6 million in liabilities when it filed for bankruptcy last month, according to documents filed Monday.

The company that fouled thousands of West Virginians’ water with a chemical leak into the Elk River on Jan. 9, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy Jan. 17.

Under the bankruptcy code, Chapter 11 permits a company to reorganize and continue operating.

Freedom markets and distributes chemicals that are mixed by Poca Blending in Nitro. Etowah River Terminal is the storage facility on the Elk that leaked the chemical. It has about a dozen tanks, each of which can hold tens of thousands of gallons of chemicals. It was formerly a Pennzoil facility.

According to the company’s statement of financial affairs filed Monday, the company made $25.6 million between July 1, 2011, and June 30, 2012, through its sale of chemicals; $30.6 million between July 1, 2012, and June 30, 2013; and $19.6 million between July 1, 2013, through when it filed for bankruptcy last month.

The Barlow Drive property, where the leak occurred, is valued at $976,493, according to the filing. It values its tanks at $8,000, the filing shows.

Freedom had $5.3 million in inventory Dec. 31, when it was last calculated, the filing states. Freedom has a $320,000 federal tax lien, according to the filing.

Freedom is holding calcium chloride in its Etowah Terminal facility for Tetra Performance Chemicals, of Dallas, Texas.

Freedom has more than $1 million worth of machinery and more than $5 million in inventory. It stores nearly $400,000 worth of parts at its Beckley facility on Holy Lane.

The rest is here:
Freedom provides more details in bankruptcy filing



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