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The Three Languages of Politics (with Arnold Kling)
If you ask “How do people talk about politics?” most of us will say something like “angrily.” But Arnold Kling thinks there's more to it than that. Kling is …

By: Libertarianism.org

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The Three Languages of Politics (with Arnold Kling) – Video

Last week the Supreme Court overturned federal limits on the total amounts that one person may contribute to candidates and political committees during a single election cycle. The government may no more restrict how many candidates or causes a donor may support than it may tell a newspaper how many candidates it may endorse, the court declared in an opinion by Chief Justice John Roberts.

But according to Justice Stephen Breyer, who wrote a dissenting opinion that was joined by three of his colleagues, the restrictions challenged in McCutcheon v. FEC are perfectly compatible with the First Amendment, which advances not only the individuals right to engage in political speech, but also the publics interest in preserving a democratic order in which collective speech matters.

The idea that individual rights must be sacrificed for the sake of a vaguely defined collective interest reflects the dangerously broad agenda of campaign-finance reformers, who seek to shape the political debate so that it comports with their own notion of the public good.

Preventing corruption is the traditional justification for limits on campaign donations. As you might expect given his nebulous aim of preserving a democratic order in which collective speech matters, Breyer favors a broad definition of corruption, including not just quid pro quo bribery (such as agreeing to vote for a bill in exchange for a donation) but also undue influence. While everyone understands what bribery entails, undue influence is in the eye of the beholder. On the day McCutcheon was argued, for instance, President Obama worried that it would exacerbate a problem created by the Supreme Courts 2010 decision in Citizens United v. FEC, which lifted restrictions on political speech by unions and corporations. The problem, according to Obama: too much speech of the wrong sort.

You have some ideological extremist who has a big bankroll, and they can entirely skew our politics, Obama complained. There are a whole bunch of members of Congress right now who privately will tell you, I know our positions are unreasonable, but were scared that if we dont go along with the Tea Party agenda or some particularly extremist agenda that well be challenged from the right. And the threats are very explicit, and so they toe the line. And thats part of why weve seen a breakdown of just normal, routine business done here in Washington on behalf of the American people.

In short, Obama thinks Citizens United was devastating (as he called it a few days after the case was decided) because it freed his opponents to criticize him and interfered with business as usual in Washington. Many Americans would see those as advantages.

In any case, its clear that Obama views campaign-finance regulation as a way of managing the political debate and keeping it from becoming too extremist, a rationale the court has never endorsed and one that is totally at odds with the First Amendments command that Congress shall make no law … abridging the freedom of speech.

Similarly, the editorial board of The New York Times, which decries the distorting power of money on American elections, cites the broad ideological change sought by the Koch brothers as a reason to keep the aggregate caps on campaign contributions. To equate the ability of billionaires to buy elections with freedom of speech is totally absurd, Rep. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) opines, while Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) bemoans the undue influence of special interests and Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) complains that the Supreme Court has chosen to pour even more money into our process and our politics.

As self-financed candidates periodically discover, you cant really buy elections. Even if a candidate is interested only in gaining and retaining power, he has to convince voters he is worthy of their trust.

The undue influence that worries Breyer, Obama, Sanders, McCain and Pelosi is ultimately based on the power of speech to persuade a power Congress is forbidden to regulate.

Continued here:
Free speech vs. protecting rights of collective speech



How the Illuminati use Church, Politics and Sex

By: mehmet can

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How the Illuminati use Church, Politics and Sex – Video

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CHATHAM (CBS/AP) A spring storm blasted the Cape and Islands with high winds and blowing snow on Wednesday, roiling the North Atlantic and leaving winter-weary residents facing the prospect of digging out from more snow.

Check: Current Conditions | Interactive Radar | WBZ Weather Blog

Cape Cod, Nantucket and Marthas Vineyard bore the brunt of the storm as it hit Massachusetts, dropping up to 10 inches of snow.

Check: Snow Totals

The snow had stopped by the afternoon but robust winds were expected through Wednesday night with gusts up to 80 mph on Nantucket, National Weather Service meteorologist Charlie Foley said.

Watch: Nantucket Emergency Management On Conditions In Nantucket

A blizzard warning was in effect and the National Weather Service also warned of coastal flooding and significant beach erosion along the Massachusetts coast. Wind gusts caused scattered power outages on the Cape and Islands.

WBZ NewsRadio 1030s Karen Twomey reports

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Cape And Islands Battered By High Winds, Blowing Snow



Inside Politics: Obama talks free speech in China
John King, Margaret Talev and Manu Raju discuss the first lady's trip to China and her comments on free speech.

By: CNN

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Inside Politics: Obama talks free speech in China – Video



Dark Forces – Illuminati in Hollywood, Politics, etc
Warrior Training – More Info / Enroll http://www.loveguru.net/warriortraining.

By: LoveGuruBlaire

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Dark Forces – Illuminati in Hollywood, Politics, etc – Video



Freedom to Not Choose – The debate over dual nationality | People and Politics
Germany's new coalition government agreed on the right to dual nationality. Individuals born and raised in Germany but with non-German parents will now be ab…

By: DW (English)

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Freedom to Not Choose – The debate over dual nationality | People and Politics – Video



Facebook To Ban 2nd Amendment Speech
Facebook now working with former N.Y. mayor to censor support for the Second Amendment Facebook is currently working with two anti-gun groups to further rest…

By: Belligerent Politics

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Facebook To Ban 2nd Amendment Speech – Video



I'm not into Politics, but Obama is in the Illuminati!
So Jonathan Davis thinks he knows his shit on Politics, but in reality he does not really know what he is talking about. Here I will hopefully correct on wha…

By: Atticus TheDeathMetaller

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I’m not into Politics, but Obama is in the Illuminati! – Video

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TRENTON, N.J. (CBSNewYork/AP) New Jersey lawmakers are considering a bill that would ban smoking at all public beaches and parks in the state.

A state Assembly committee advanced the proposal at a hearing Thursday morning. It now goes to the full Assembly, where a final vote has not been scheduled.

The bill is designed to eliminate exposure to secondhand smoke at beaches and parks, cut down on litter and improve fire safety in those public areas. Smoking would still be allowed in parking lots near beaches and parks.

Violators would get fined $250 for a first offense, $500 for a second offense and $1,000 for subsequent ones.

When you look at our public parks and beaches, we do not want people to experience secondhand smoke, or increase the litter of cigarette butts, said Assemblywoman Valerie Vainieri-Huttle, one of the bills sponsors. This enhances our beaches. I think it promotes more tourism.

Karen Blumenfeld, executive director of Global Advisors on Smokefree Policy, said more than a third of New Jerseys municipalities have laws on the books that restrict smoking in parks and recreational areas.

We all know that theres no safe level of secondhand smoke at all, she said. Secondhand smoke outdoors does affect people.

Blumenfeld said some beach towns already have banned smoking on their sands, including Seaside Park, Long Branch, and Sunset Beach in Cape May Point.

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New Jersey Weighs Smoking Ban At Beaches, Parks

This Wednesday I stumbled upon an article in Richmonds Style Weekly magazine covering the Feb. 8 convention of the Libertarian Party of Virginia. According to the articles author Tom Nash, this convention was the biggest and most important for Virginia Libertarians for quite some while. Given the recent relative success of the partys gubernatorial candidate Robert Sarvis (who made his mark by running a seemingly honest, intellectual campaign and winning 6.5 percent of the vote), Nash contends that the party hopes to maintain this momentum by having as many Libertarians as possible on the upcoming ballots.

Apparently, the tactic to achieve this involves inviting everyone on the partys email list to run for office, even if they have no chance of winning. One person who received this invitation was a high school student from the Maggie L. Walker Governors School for Government and International Studies. The student told Nash that he would consider running for office after finishing college.

Anyone who knows me also knows that my politics tend to fall so far left that they occasionally slip off the scale into an alternate universe where the gender binary has been all but eradicated, socialism reigns and everyone is free to sip tea and play with their cats in a borderless world of total equality.

Needless to say, libertarianism is not always consistent with these ideals. I do, however, hold a soft spot in my heart for the well-intentioned rationality of the party, so Nashs article made me wonder how many capable, up-and-coming young people might be drawn into politics by what is essentially a power vacuum in the Libertarian party.

One member of the University of Richmonds chapter of Young Americans for Liberty, Kelly Farley, WC17, said she planned on pursuing business as a career, but could easily see herself in politics: Libertarians are the party of the individual, liberty and, in my opinion, self-responsibility. I would be honored and proud to represent the libertarian opinion some day.

Another UR student, Martha Ashe, WC15, said that although she identified with the Libertarian party philosophically, she chooses to vote Republican because she is fiscally conservative and the party has more traction. She said, While I dont think I would ever run for politics, if I did, it would be hard for me to run as a Libertarian because I dont think the party has as much traction at this time. Ashe added, however, that she is confident we are trending toward a greater support of libertarianism: I do believe that most young people in my generation are Libertarian, whether they realize it or not, and that as my generation matures, the libertarian party will start to gain popularity.

While the upper levels of the two dominant parties in this country can seem like private clubs that require 80 percent networking and 20 percent underhanded dealing to gain entry, it might be that all it takes in Virginias Libertarian party right now is to show up.

Since the platform tends to attract a mixture of young people who are intelligent, ambitious or radical (and occasionally all three), I can happily picture a future where the party is dominated not by gun- and flag-toting old men, but by recent college graduates with clear plans for a more free country. Whether or not I support the whole ideology, I would rather have a relevant faction of young, educated people than not.

Read more here:
Recruiting the next generation of political leaders

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POINT PLEASANT BEACH, N.J. (AP) New Jerseys Top Ten Beaches contest is back after a one-year break while the shore began its recovery from Superstorm Sandy.

Voting started Monday in the contest, sponsored by the New Jersey Sea Grant Consortium and Richard Stockton Colleges Costal Resource Center. Ballots can be cast online at www.njtoptenbeaches.org.

The contest was started in 2008 to encourage stewardship of and pride in the states beaches while promoting a competition for bragging rights among New Jerseys favorite beach towns. Previous versions asked beachgoers to share their favorite memories and photos of the Jersey shore.

New wrinkles in this years contest ask beachgoers to consider specific things about their favorite beaches, including how much it costs to access the beach and whether amenities such as parking and restrooms are available.

This year were asking people to take a little time to really think about the criteria that make the places they pick worthy of winning a spot on the 2014 Top Ten list, said Kim Kosko, a spokeswoman for the Sea Grant Consortium. We want them to realize how important our beaches and other coastal assets are and that were all responsible for their well-being. What we do today directly impacts the future of shore communities.

This years contest also ends the regional groupings that had allowed clusters of beaches to compete as a single unit in past years. For instance, Wildwood, Wildwood Crest and North Wildwood had for many years competed as a single entity, The Wildwoods. This year, each individual town will be voted on separately. The same goes for individual beach towns on Long Beach Island.

Voting runs through April 30. Winners will be announced on May 22.

The contest was suspended last year while parts of the shore struggled to recover from the damage Sandy caused on Oct. 29, 2012.

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New Jerseys Top 10 Beaches Contest Resumes After Superstorm Sandy

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BOSTON (AP) A new report is warning that improvements in the quality of beaches in the metropolitan Boston area in recent years are being threatened by budget and staffing cuts to the state agency overseeing them.

A draft report by the Metropolitan Beaches Commission obtained by The Associated Press is calling for the hiring of more full-time and seasonal employees, from beach managers to workers who help clean the sand.

The report also makes a series of recommendations about ways to improve the seaside experience, including instituting trolley shuttle services to some beaches, allowing kayak rentals and enhancing bicycle and pedestrian connections between beaches.

State Sen. Thomas McGee, co-chairman of the commission, said many of the beaches were in rough shape before the commission issued its first recommendations in 2007. He said the state was able to make real progress, and the investments made a difference.

McGee said its important not to let those improvements slip away.

We need to go from beaches that are good to beaches that are great, he said. We heard that loud and clear. If they can go to the beaches and really enjoy them, people understand that we are doing the right thing.

Bruce Berman of the group Save the Harbor/Save the Bay, which worked with the commission, said staffing levels at the Department of Conservation and Recreation have slipped in recent years as the state faced tighter budgets.

The bad news is that the gains we made are at risk because of the erosion of DCRs budget during the recession, Berman said.

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Report: Mass. Beaches Imperiled By Budget Cuts



Second Amendment Music. Artist Pedro Reyes Turns Guns Into Musical Instruments
Second Amendment Music. Artist Pedro Reyes Turns Guns Into Musical Instruments.

By: Les Grossman Best of YouTube – News Politics

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Second Amendment Music. Artist Pedro Reyes Turns Guns Into Musical Instruments – Video

One of the main problems with an unremittingly hostile view of government held by many associated with the tea party, libertarianism and constitutionalism is that it obscures and undermines the social contributions of a truly conservative vision of government.

Politics requires a guiding principle of public action. For popular liberalism, it is often the rule of good intentions: If it sounds good, do it. Social problems can be solved by compassionate, efficient regulation and bureaucratic management which is seldom efficient and invites unintended consequences in complex, unmanageable systems (say, the one-sixth of the U.S. economy devoted to health care). The signal light for government intervention is stuck on green.

For libertarians and their ideological relatives, the guiding principle is the maximization of individual liberty. It is a theory of government consisting mainly of limits and boundaries. The light is almost always red.

Conservatism offers a different principle of public action though a bit more difficult to explain than go or stop. In the traditional conservative view, individual liberty is ennobled and ordered within social institutions families, religious communities, neighborhoods, voluntary associations, local governments and nations. The success of individuals is tied to the health of these institutions, which prepare them for the responsible exercise of freedom and the duties of citizenship.

This is a limiting principle: Higher levels of government should show deference to private associations and local institutions. But this is also a guide to appropriate governmental action needed when local and private institutions are enervated or insufficient in scale to achieve the public good.

So conservatism is a governing vision that allows for a yellow light: careful, measured public interventions to encourage the health of civil society. There are no simple rules here. Some communities disproportionately affected by family breakdown, community chaos or damaging economic trends will need more active help. But government should, as the first resort, set the table for private action and private institutions creating a context in which civil society can flourish.

This goal has moral and cultural implications. Government has a necessary (if limited) role in reinforcing the social norms and expectations that make the work of civic institutions both possible and easier. Some forms of liberty say, the freedom to destroy oneself with hard drugs or to exploit men and women in the sex trade not only degrade human nature but damage and undermine families and communities and ultimately deprive the nation of competent, self-governing citizens.

But conservatives also need to take seriously the economic implications of this governing vision. Just as citizens must be prepared for the exercise of liberty, individuals must be given the skills and values human capital that will allow them to succeed in a free economy.

This is the essence of equal opportunity. But it is not a natural social condition. And many conservatives have failed to recognize the extent to which this defining American promise has been hollowed out.

Economic mobility is stalled for many poorer Americans, resulting in persistent, intergenerational inequality. This problem is more complex than an income gap. It involves wide disparities in parental time and investment, in community involvement and in academic accomplishment. These are traceable to a number of factors that defy easy ideological categorization, including the collapse of working-class families and the flight of decent blue-collar jobs.

More here:
How the tea party undermines conservatism

free speech n.

The right to express any opinion in public without censorship or restraint by the government.

1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the right to express one’s opinions publicly

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free speech – definition of free speech by the Free Online …

Posted by Pamela Geller on 1-11-14 in Articles, Islam, News, US News

Since I wrote my bookStop the Islamization of Americaand established the Stop Islamization of America initiative of my organization, the American Freedom Defense Initiative (AFDI),we have seen…

Posted by Mac Slavo on 1-09-14 in Politics, Taxes, US News, Videos, Welfare

The Texas Congresswoman who once urged a Congressional oversight panel to study how Christian militants and other radicals might bring down the country has some new progressive ideas shed…

Posted by Shea Bernard on 1-09-14 in Articles, Christianity, Homosexuality

An anonymous student letter to Phil Robertson from a homosexual University of Louisiana at Monroe (ULM) student has surfaced in social & traditional media. Naturally, it is being held in high…

Posted by Tim Brown on 1-09-14 in Corruption, Featured, Politics

Editors Note: Our previous article from Dan, citing 252 Documented Examples of Barack Obamas Lying, Lawbreaking, Corruption, Cronyism, etc., has been updated to 504 documented examples. The…

Posted by The Common Constitutionalist on 1-09-14 in Articles, News, Politics

The political universe is all a twitter over the former secretary of defense, Robert Gatess new book, Duty. Bret Baier of Fox news described the book as a, scathing…

View original post here:
Freedom Outpost | Don’t Tread on Us

WASHINGTON One of the main problems with an unremittingly hostile view of government held by many associated with the tea party, libertarianism and constitutionalism is that it obscures and undermines the social contributions of a truly conservative vision of government.

Politics requires a guiding principle of public action. For popular liberalism, it is often the rule of good intentions: If it sounds good, do it. Social problems can be solved by compassionate, efficient regulation and bureaucratic management which is seldom efficient and invites unintended consequences in complex, unmanageable systems (say, the one-sixth of the U.S. economy devoted to health care). The signal light for government intervention is stuck on green.

For libertarians and their ideological relatives, the guiding principle is the maximization of individual liberty. It is a theory of government consisting mainly of limits and boundaries. The light is almost always red.

Conservatism (as my co-author Peter Wehner and I explain in our recent National Affairs essay, A Conservative Vision of Government) offers a different principle of public action though a bit more difficult to explain than go or stop.

In the traditional conservative view, individual liberty is ennobled and ordered within social institutions families, religious communities, neighborhoods, voluntary associations, local governments and nations. The success of individuals is tied to the health of these institutions, which prepare them for the responsible exercise of freedom and the duties of citizenship.

This is a limiting principle: Higher levels of government should show deference to private associations and local institutions. But this is also a guide to appropriate governmental action needed when local and private institutions are enervated or insufficient in scale to achieve the public good.

So conservatism is a governing vision that allows for a yellow light: careful, measured public interventions to encourage the health of civil society.

There are no simple rules here. Some communities disproportionately affected by family breakdown, community chaos or damaging economic trends will need more active help. But government should, as the first resort, set the table for private action and private institutions creating a context in which civil society can flourish.

This goal has moral and cultural implications. Government has a necessary (if limited) role in reinforcing the social norms and expectations that make the work of civic institutions both possible and easier. Some forms of liberty say, the freedom to destroy oneself with hard drugs or to exploit other men and women in the sex trade not only degrade human nature but damage and undermine families and communities and ultimately deprive the nation of competent, self-governing citizens.

(The principle applies, more mildly, to softer drugs. By what governing theory did the citizens of Colorado surveying the challenges of global economic competition, educational mediocrity and unhealthy lifestyles decide that the answer is the proliferation of stoners?)

See original here:
MICHAEL GERSON: Best approach a yellow light for government



[FREE PDF] Freedom's Debt: The Royal African Company and the Politics of the Atlantic Slave Trade
Download Link : http://www.rarshare.com/freedoms-debt-the-royal-african-company-and-the-politics-of-the-atlantic-slave-trade-1672-1752-by-william-a-pettigrew…

By: Annie Burns

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[FREE PDF] Freedom’s Debt: The Royal African Company and the Politics of the Atlantic Slave Trade – Video



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