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WASHINGTON Dissenters within the National Security Agency, led by a senior agency executive, warned in 2009 that the program to secretly collect American phone records wasnt providing enough intelligence to justify the backlash it would cause if revealed, current and former intelligence officials say.

The NSA took the concerns seriously, and many senior officials shared them. But after an internal debate that has not been previously reported, NSA leaders, White House officials and key lawmakers opted to continue the collection and storage of American calling records, a domestic surveillance program without parallel in the agencys recent history.

The warnings proved prophetic last year after the calling records program was made public in the first and most significant leak by Edward Snowden, a former NSA systems administrator who cited the governments deception about the program as one of his chief motivations for turning over classified documents to journalists. Many Americans were shocked and dismayed to learn that an intelligence agency collects and stores all their landline calling records.

In response, President Barack Obama is now trying to stop the NSA collection but preserve the agencys ability to search the records in the hands of the telephone companies an arrangement similar to the one the administration quietly rejected in 2009. But his plan, drawing opposition from most Republicans, fell two votes short of advancing in the Senate on Tuesday.

A now-retired NSA senior executive, who was a longtime code-breaker who rose to top management, had just learned in 2009 about the top secret program that was created shortly after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. He says he argued to then-NSA Director Keith Alexander that storing the calling records of nearly every American fundamentally changed the character of the agency, which is supposed to eavesdrop on foreigners, not Americans.

Alexander politely disagreed, the former official told The Associated Press.

The former official, who spoke only on condition of anonymity because he didnt have permission to discuss a classified matter, said he knows of no evidence the program was used for anything other than hunting for terrorism plots in the U.S. But he said he and others made the case that the collection of American records in bulk crossed a line that had been sacrosanct.

He said he also warned of a scandal if it should be disclosed that the NSA was storing records of private calls by Americans to psychiatrists, lovers and suicide hotlines, among other contacts.

Alexander, who led the NSA from 2005 until he retired last year, did not dispute the former officials account, though he said he disagreed that the program was improper.

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NSA dissenters warned of possible privacy backlash in 2009

June 6, 2013: A sign stands outside the National Security Agency (NSA) campus in Fort Meade, Md.(AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

WASHINGTON Dissenters within the National Security Agency, led by a senior agency executive, warned in 2009 that the program to secretly collect American phone records wasn’t providing enough intelligence to justify the backlash it would cause if revealed, current and former intelligence officials say.

The NSA took the concerns seriously, and many senior officials shared them. But after an internal debate that has not been previously reported, NSA leaders, White House officials and key lawmakers opted to continue the collection and storage of American calling records, a domestic surveillance program without parallel in the agency’s recent history.

The warnings proved prophetic last year after the calling records program was made public in the first and most significant leak by Edward Snowden, a former NSA systems administrator who cited the government’s deception about the program as one of his chief motivations for turning over classified documents to journalists. Many Americans were shocked and dismayed to learn that an intelligence agency collects and stores all their landline calling records.

In response, President Barack Obama is now trying to stop the NSA collection but preserve the agency’s ability to search the records in the hands of the telephone companies an arrangement similar to the one the administration quietly rejected in 2009. But his plan, drawing opposition from most Republicans, fell two votes short of advancing in the Senate on Tuesday.

A now-retired NSA senior executive, who was a longtime code-breaker who rose to top management, had just learned in 2009 about the top secret program that was created shortly after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. He says he argued to then-NSA Director Keith Alexander that storing the calling records of nearly every American fundamentally changed the character of the agency, which is supposed to eavesdrop on foreigners, not Americans.

Alexander politely disagreed, the former official told The Associated Press.

The former official, who spoke only on condition of anonymity because he didn’t have permission to discuss a classified matter, said he knows of no evidence the program was used for anything other than hunting for terrorism plots in the U.S. But he said he and others made the case that the collection of American records in bulk crossed a line that had been sacrosanct.

He said he also warned of a scandal if it should be disclosed that the NSA was storing records of private calls by Americans to psychiatrists, lovers and suicide hotlines, among other contacts.

Alexander, who led the NSA from 2005 until he retired last year, did not dispute the former official’s account, though he said he disagreed that the program was improper.

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NSA continued to collect phone data despite internal warning of backlash

This undated photo provided by the National Security Agency (NSA) shows its headquarters in Fort Meade, Maryland.  NSA via Getty Images

WASHINGTON – The Senate on Tuesday blocked a bill to end bulk collection of American phone records by the National Security Agency, dealing a blow to President Barack Obama’s primary proposal to rein in domestic surveillance.

The 58-42 vote was two short of the 60 needed to proceed with debate. Voting was largely along party lines, with most Democrats supporting the bill and most Republicans voting against it. The Republican-controlled House had previously passed its own NSA bill.

The legislation would have ended the NSA’s collection of domestic calling records, instead requiring the agency to obtain a court order each time it wanted to analyze the records in terrorism cases, and query records held by the telephone companies. In many cases the companies store the records for 18 months.

The revelation that the spying agency had been collecting and storing domestic phone records since shortly after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, was among the most significant by Edward Snowden, a former agency network administrator who turned over secret NSA documents to journalists. The agency collects only so-called metadata – numbers called, not names – and not the content of conversations. But the specter of the intelligence agency holding domestic calling records was deeply disquieting to many Americans.

The bill had drawn support from technology companies and civil liberties activists. Its failure means there has been little in the way of policy changes as a result of Snowden’s disclosures.

Pressured to act, Obama in January proposed curbing the NSA’s authority and the House in May passed a bill to do so. While the measure was pending, the NSA continued to collect American landline calling records, though the program does not cover most mobile phone records.

The law authorizing the bulk collection, a provision of the post-9/11 USA Patriot Act, will expire in June 2015. That means Congress would have to pass legislation re-authorizing the program for it to continue.

For that reason, Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California, the chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, abandoned her previous opposition to the bill. “If we do not pass the bill, we will lose this program,” Feinstein said on the Senate floor.

“This bill increases trust and confidence and credibility of our intelligence system,” said Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn.

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Senate inaction allows NSA to keep collecting phone records

While the debate rages over net neutrality and how heavily Internet service providers should be regulated, the bottom line is that as Web usage explodes, somebody will have to pay for the capacity it takes for that connectivity, Liberty Media Chairman John Malone told CNBC on Wednesday.

“It’s either going to be the people who have a relationship with the consumer indirectly through the transport of the Internet or it’s going to be the Internet companies themselves … charging for volume usage at the consumer end,” he said in an interview aired on “Squawk on the Street.”

“The economics have to work because this capacity is not cheap.”

Last week, President Barack Obama asked the Federal Communications Commission to set strong rules to protect net neutrality, which would keep the Internet open and free.

Read MoreConfused by net neutrality? Read this

Malone said it would be “unfortunate” if the government intervened too heavily.

“Letting this capital marketplace play out will see multiple terrestrial providersat least two, since the telephone industry has pretty much committed to build out and upgrade their network.”

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Liberty's Malone on net neutrality

FILE: An aerial view of the NSA’s Utah Data Center in Bluffdale, Utah.(AP)

The Senate on Tuesday blocked a bill to end bulk collection of American phone records by the National Security Agency, dealing a blow to President Barack Obama’s primary proposal to rein in domestic surveillance.

The 58-42 vote was two short of the 60 needed to proceed with debate. Voting was largely along party lines, with most Democrats supporting the bill and most Republicans voting against it. The Republican-controlled House had previously passed its own NSA bill.

The legislation would have ended the NSA’s collection of domestic calling records, instead requiring the agency to obtain a court order each time it wanted to analyze the records in terrorism cases, and query records held by the telephone companies. In many cases the companies store the records for 18 months.

The revelation that the spying agency had been collecting and storing domestic phone records since shortly after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, was among the most significant by Edward Snowden, a former agency network administrator who turned over secret NSA documents to journalists. The agency collects only so-called metadata numbers called, not names and not the content of conversations. But the specter of the intelligence agency holding domestic calling records was deeply disquieting to many Americans.

The bill had drawn support from technology companies and civil liberties activists. Its failure means there has been little in the way of policy changes as a result of Snowden’s disclosures.

Pressured to act, Obama in January proposed curbing the NSA’s authority and the House in May passed a bill to do so. While the measure was pending, the NSA continued to collect American landline calling records, though the program does not cover most mobile phone records.

The law authorizing the bulk collection, a provision of the post-9/11 USA Patriot Act, will expire at the end of 2015. That means Congress would have to pass legislation re-authorizing the program for it to continue.

For that reason, Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California, the chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, abandoned her previous opposition to the bill. “If we do not pass the bill, we will lose this program,” Feinstein said on the Senate floor.

“This bill increases trust and confidence and credibility of our intelligence system,” said Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn.

Read more:
Key GOP senators oppose NSA phone records measure

The administration of U.S. President Barack Obama urged the Senate to pass the USA Freedom Act, which would curb the bulk collection of telephone records by the National Security Agency in the wake of widespread concerns about potential violations of privacy.

The administration has asked the Senate to pass the legislation and for the House of Representatives, which earlier passed a weakened version of the bill, to act quickly so that Obama can sign the legislation into law this year, according to a statement Monday from the executive office of the president. The bill has to pass both in the Senate and the House before it can become law.

A procedural vote in the Senate on the legislation, which has got the backing of civil rights activists and other groups, could come on Tuesday, with a final vote on the bill in the days following.

The bill strengthens the FISAs privacy and civil liberties protections, while preserving essential authorities that our intelligence and law enforcement professionals need, according to the statement, which noted that the administration strongly supports Senate passage of the legislation. If the bill is not passed, critical national security authorizations that are reformed in the legislation could expire next summer, it added.

The administration is, however, hopeful that the legislation will resolve concerns from intelligence officials about a provision in the bill that allows an independent privacy advocate to argue before the FISA Court in support of individual privacy and civil liberties. The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, better known as FISA, governs NSA surveillance.

Former NSA contractor Edward Snowden triggered strong privacy concerns in the U.S. and abroad after his disclosures last year that the government was collecting telephone metadata of Americans in bulk from Verizon and also intercepting Internet communications, placing technology companies in an embarrassing position with their users.

A number of countries are now demanding that cloud companies store data locally to avoid access to the information by U.S. law enforcement.

The Senate bill requires the NSA to use specific selection terms to limit its targets in the telephone records collection, and requires the government to issue reports on the number of people targeted in surveillance programs.

The bill introduced by Senator Patrick Leahy, a Democrat from Vermont, is a version of the bill passed in the House, which was criticized by privacy advocates for watering down key privacy provisions, including in the criteria for search terms to collect phone records.

Some critics of the bill, however, argue that the USA Freedom Act does not address surveillance and data collections under other provisions such as Section 702 of the amended FISA Act, which covers surveillance of non-U.S. persons located outside the U.S.

Continued here:
Obama backs passing of NSA reform legislation by Senate



CORRUPT OBAMA DEMOCRAT COPS SAID YOU ONLY HAVE FREE SPEECH IN CERTAIN PLACES
CORRUPT OBAMA DEMOCRAT COPS SAID YOU ONLY HAVE FREE SPEECH IN CERTAIN PLACES CHARLOTTE COUNTY FLORIDA SHERIFF CORRUPTION …

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Senate Democrats took the first steps Wednesday to set a final vote on a bill to halt the NSAs phone-snooping program, in a move that signals a developing consensus to try to shut the program down before the end of the year.

Democratic leaders set a first test vote for Friday, which would likely be followed by final passage next week adding yet another major issue to the list of priorities in the short lame-duck session.

Senators will vote on a revamped version of the bill written by SenateJudiciary Committee Chairman Patrick J. Leahy, Vermont Democrat, choosing that option over a more NSA-friendly bill that passed the House earlier this year.

The American people are wondering whether Congress can get anything done, Mr. Leahy said in statement. The answer is yes.

Under the NSA phone program, revealed by former government contractor Edward Snowden, the government collected the numbers, times and durations of phone calls made by Americans. The information was stored for years, so government analysts could use it to try to track down potential terrorist links.

The Obama administration defended the program, saying it had approval of a special secret court and had been run by a small group of members of Congress who oversee intelligence activities. But many other lawmakers felt the program went too far including Rep. F. James Sensenbrenner Jr., author of the 2001 Patriot Act that the government used as legal justification for the program.

There is no excuse not to pass this fundamental piece of legislation during the lame duck, said Mr. Sensenbrenner, Wisconsin Republican.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid moved to schedule the votes. He had resisted for months as an internal fight brewed within his party between Mr. Leahy on the one hand and Sen. Dianne Feinstein, California Democrat and chairwoman of the Senate intelligence committee, who had written a more lenient bill that would have let the NSA continue to collect phone records.

But with Democrats time in control of the Senate about to end, Mr. Reid acted.

Not everyone is on board with Mr. Leahys bill, which bans bulk collection of Americans records and requires the government to be more selective when it seeks data.

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NSA phone snooping ban set for Senate vote

Here’s one honor Meryl Streep has never been accused of hogging: President Obama is awarding the multiple Oscar-winning actress, a Summit native, with the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Obama today named the 19 recipients of the nation’s highest civilian honor and will present the awards at the White House on Nov. 24. Streep, who graduated from Bernards High School, holds the record for the most Oscar nominations in history, 18, and has won three times, most recently in 2012 for “The Iron Lady.”

The 2014 class includes fellow cultural treasures, including influential Broadway composer Stephen Sondheim (Streep is starring in the upcoming film adaptation of Sondheim’s “Into the Woods”), actress, author and social activist Marlo Thomas, and soulful singer, songwriter and musician Stevie Wonder. A posthumous award will be given to choreographer Alvin Ailey.

Included in the roll of those who have made “especially meritorious contributions to the security or national interests of the United States, to world peace, or to cultural or other significant public or private endeavors” are: writer Isabel Allende; newsman Tom Brokaw; physicist Mildred Dresselhaus; legislator John Dingell, the longest-serving Congressman in American history; human rights and environmental activist Ethel Kennedy; Native American writer and activist Suzan Harjo; and Abner Mikva, a former Congressman and chief judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit.

Also: Patsy Takemoto Mink, a Hawai’ian congresswoman, the first woman of color elected to Congress, and a co-author of Title IX; Edward Roybal, the first Mexican-American to be elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from California in nearly a century; professional golfer Charles Sifford, who helped desegregate the PGA; economist and Nobel laureate Robert Solow; and James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner, the Freedom Riders who were killed in Mississippi in 1964 for attempting to register African-American voters.

Vicki Hyman may be reached at vhyman@njadvancemedia.com. Follow her on Twitter @vickihy. Find NJ.com/Entertainment on Facebook.

Read more:
N.J.’s Meryl Streep to receive Presidential Medal of Freedom

By Kevin Liptak, CNN

updated 6:38 AM EST, Tue November 11, 2014

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

Washington (CNN) — The longest-serving lawmaker in U.S. congressional history, a legendary Motown artist, and the matriarch of a renowned political family will be among this year’s recipients of the nation’s highest civilian honor, the White House announced Monday.

Rep. John Dingell, Stevie Wonder and Ethel Kennedy are three of the nineteen Americans who Obama will bestow the Presidential Medal of Freedom upon later this month.

Dingell has served nearly 60 years in Congress representing a district outside Detroit. He’ll retire at the end of this session. Wonder has won 25 Grammys and an Oscar for his fusion of soul, rhythm and blues and jazz. And Kennedy, who is the widow of Sen. Robert F. Kennedy, became an activist for human rights and the environment after her husband’s death.

Other honorees this year include Meryl Streep, the prolific actress known for holding the most Oscar nominations of any actor in history. She stars this winter in “Into the Woods,” the musical composed by Stephen Sondheim, to whom Obama will also award the Medal of Freedom on November 24.

Tom Brokaw, the former “NBC Nightly News” anchor, will be honored as well, alongside actress Marlo Thomas, golfer Charles Sifford and author Isabel Allende.

The other medalists are scientist Mildred Dresselhaus; Native American activist Suzan Harjo; former Reps. Abner Mikva of Illinois and Patsy Takemoto Mink of Hawaii; and economist Robert Solow.

Five awards will be delivered posthumously: to “Freedom Summer” civil rights activists James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner; to the well-known choreographer Alvin Ailey, who founded the namesake dance company; and to Rep. Edward Roybal, the founder of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus.

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Presidential Medal of Freedom winners: Wonder, Streep

President Barack Obama named 19 Presidential Medal of Freedom recipients Monday. NBC News’ Tom Brokaw, Meryl Streep and Stevie Wonder were among those named to receive the nation’s highest civilian honor.

Obama said in a statement, “I look forward to presenting these nineteen bold, inspiring Americans with our Nations highest civilian honor. From activists who fought for change to artists who explored the furthest reaches of our imagination; from scientists who kept America on the cutting edge to public servants who help write new chapters in our American story, these citizens have made extraordinary contributions to our country and the world.”

The White House awards ceremony is Nov. 24.

This year’s full list of Medal of Freedom recipients:

First published November 10 2014, 3:43 PM

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Tom Brokaw, Meryl Streep, Stevie Wonder Awarded Medal of Freedom

President Obama will award the Presidential Medal of Freedom this month to 19 recipients ranging from actress Marlo Thomas to physicist Mildred Dresselhaus.

The Presidential Medal of Freedom is the nations highest civilian honor. It is awarded to people who have made especially meritorious contributions in a variety of areas, including U.S. security, national interests and the arts, according to the White House.

The actors, songwriters, activists, public servants and others who will be honored in the Nov. 24 ceremony include actress Meryl Streep; journalist Tom Brokaw; former professional golfer Charles Sifford, who helped desegregate the Professional Golfers Association of America; economist Robert Solow; composer Stephen Sondheim; and outgoing Rep. John D. Dingell Jr. (D-Mich.), the longest-serving member of Congress in U.S. history.

A number of recipients will receive the award posthumously, including choreographer Alvin Ailey and Edward R. Roybal, the first Mexican American to be elected to the House of Representatives. James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner, civil rights activists who were killed while working to register black voters in Mississippi during Freedom Summer 50 years ago, will also receive the award.

I look forward to presenting these nineteen bold, inspiring Americans with our Nations highest civilian honor, Obama said in a statement. From activists who fought for change to artists who explored the furthest reaches of our imagination; from scientists who kept America on the cutting edge to public servants who help write new chapters in our American story, these citizens have made extraordinary contributions to our country and the world.

The Presidential Medal of Freedom was established by President John F. Kennedy in 1963. Since then, more than 500 people have received the award. One of those receiving the award this year will be Ethel Kennedy, the widow of Robert F. Kennedy.

Obama will also present the award to Stevie Wonder, who received the Library of Congresss Gershwin Prize in 2009. At that ceremony, Obama said that Wonders You and I was his wedding song.

I think its fair to say that had I not been a Stevie Wonder fan, Michelle might not have dated me. We might not have married, Obama said. The fact that we agreed on Stevie was part of the essence of our courtship.

Wonder still wows

Stevie Wonder, a medal recipient, signed, sealed and delivered a fine D.C. show Sunday. C2

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Meryl Streep, John Dingell and 17 others to receive Presidential Medal of Freedom



Second Amendment Destroys Race Baiting Left
News TYT 2014 News American 2014 News USA 2014 News October 2014 Breaking News USA breaking news September 2014 Breaking News Obama News world 2014 News worl…

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'Russia serves as pretext for NATO build up' 1
News TYT 2014 News American 2014 News USA 2014 News October 2014 Breaking News USA breaking news September 2014 Breaking News Obama News world 2014 News world 2013 News …

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‘Russia serves as pretext for NATO build up’ 1 – Video



Putin is illuminati Confirmed
Face the truth. Credits: Putin Topless Putin illuminati Putin Cumberbatch Snipars Illuminati Obama Osama The guy who talked in the video.

By: HimyProductions

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Putin is illuminati Confirmed – Video



Is Obama Illuminati, Evil, or Incompetent and Why Don't Your Leaders Stop Him?
Is Obama Illuminati, Evil, or Incompetent and Why Don't Your Leaders Stop Him? 2016 Presidential Candidates NEW COMEDY STATION …

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Is Obama Illuminati, Evil, or Incompetent and Why Don’t Your Leaders Stop Him? – Video

And some of the theories out there at the moment really take some believing. Here are five:

1. The Ebola virus is an escaped bioweapon

Some believe the Ebola outbreak started with sinister armed men poisoning wells, a successful attempt at mass murder that led to arrests in Liberia. Louis Farrakhan, leader of the Nation of Islam, reckons the virus has been designed to affect only black people. If you are black or brown, you are being selected for destruction.

Others believe its an escaped military bioweapon. This theorys chief proponent is Prof Francis Boyle, a noted scholar of biowarfare and international law at the University of Illinois. In the US Prof Boyle literally wrote the rules of biowarfare. He was a member of the governments Committee of Military Use of Biotechnology and principal author of the Biological Weapons Anti Terrorism Act of 1989 which was signed into law by George Bush Snr. This isnt normal Ebola at all, he says. I believe its been genetically modified.

Boyle points to the existence of US government laboratories in Africa that are creating bioweapons under the guise of innocently working on cures. What they tell you is, We can imagine some exotic disease out there that could be used as a biological weapon, so therefore we have to look into it. The first step is to weaponise the disease so we can develop a vaccine for it. What diseases are they working on? Every type of biowarfare agent you can possibly imagine, including dengue fever and Ebola.

One of these laboratories, says Boyle, is in Kenema, Sierra Leone. Kenema is the absolute epicentre of the outbreak. Something happened there. It could have been an accident in the lab or they might have been testing an experimental vaccine [on the population] using live genetically modified Ebola and calling it something else. The proof, for Boyle, that this is a modified form of Ebola is in both the speed of its spread and the number it is killing. In the other outbreaks its a 50 per cent fatality rate and it was contained. Right here, were dealing with a 70 per cent and its not contained. All the evidence Ive been able to locate leads me to believe it came out of the Kenema lab. How high does the cover-up go? I think the people at the top know. Probably Obama too.

Critics of the theory observe that if this was an altered version of the disease, the changes to its structure would be observable to scientists. However, DNA analysis of samples sourced from 78 individuals affected by the current outbreak was recently published in the journal Science. It found this subtly different variant likely diverged from central African lineages around 10 years ago before spreading into west Africa in May. It is, in other words, perfectly natural.

2. Aeroplanes are killing us

We are being sprayed by sinister aeroplanes. We are being poisoned, en masse, from the heavens. You can tell by looking up. Why is it that some condensation trails, or contrails, left by commercial craft dissipate after a short amount of time, whereas others remain for hours and expand? And why is it that these suspected chemical trails, or chemtrails, tend to be laid out in rows of the same direction, as if theyre part of a meticulously planned pattern?

The Chemtrails Project UK is one of hundreds of websites devoted to the popular chemtrails theory. It confidently asserts the streaks are highly toxic trails left by jet planes that contain high levels of heavy metals. Their purpose? Its a geo-engineering project, perhaps an attempt to control global warming. Others say theyre brain-numbing chemical agents used to control the population.

Link:
'Ebola is man-made', and other crazy conspiracy theories

Before May, Congress has no alternative but to endorse or end NSA spying on the phone calls of virtually every American. What does the new party in charge want?

Toby Melville/Reuters

The Patriot Act substantially expires in May 2015.

When the new Congress takes up its reauthorization, mere months after convening, members will be forced to decide what to do about Section 215 of the law, the provision cited by the NSA to justify logging most every telephone call made by Americans.

With Republicans controlling both the Senate and the House, the GOP faces a stark choice. Is a party that purports to favor constitutional conservatism and limited government going to ratify mass surveillance that makes a mockery of the Fourth Amendment? Will Mitch McConnell endorse a policy wherein the Obama administration logs and stores every telephone number dialed or received by Roger Ailes of Fox News, Wayne LaPierre of the NRA, the Koch brothers, the head of every pro-life organization in America, and every member of the Tea Party? Is the GOP House going to sacrifice the privacy of all its constituents to NSA spying that embodies the generalized warrants so abhorrent to the founders?

The issue divides elected Republicans. Senator Rand Paul and Representative Justin Amash are among those wary of tracking the phone calls of millions of innocent people. Senator Richard Burr favors doing it. Republicans pondering a run for president in 2016 will be trying to figure out how mass surveillance will play in that campaign.

Many would rather not take any stand before May, as if governingthe very job citizens are paying them to dois some sort of trap. But their preferences don’t matter. This fight is unavoidable.

Nor is it the only one that touches on surveillance. The dubiously named USA Freedom Act began as an effort to reform the NSA and has since been weakened. The NSA and FBI engages in lots of questionable surveillance besides the phone dragnet. Republicans will now run the Senate and House intelligence committees.

Rather than urging the GOP to avoid “the governing trap,” National Review and other outlets purportedly dedicated to constitutional conservatism ought to be demanding that Republicans use their newfound power to rein in our surveillance bureaucracy, since anyone with a healthy mistrust of government should see how easily its staggering power, exercised in secret, could be ruinous to liberty. A limited-government movement that does not demand oversight and reform now that its party has regained power is a farce. To endorse the national surveillance bureaucracy as it now stands is tantamount to declaring oneself a trusting statist.

And opposing it would be a populist victory that puts Republicans in a position to truthfully brag about fighting to save core liberties from Barack Obama, Joe Biden, Hillary Clinton, and every other prominent Democratic apologist for the NSA.

The rest is here:
Now the GOP Must Choose: Mass Surveillance or Privacy?



Barack Obama and the illuminati Exposed (Conspiracy Theory )
Barack Obama and the illuminati Exposed (Conspiracy Theory ) The “illuminati” : “what is zionism” : “freemasons” : “anti-christ” : “all seeing eye” : The “illuminati” “what is zionism” “freemason…

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Intelligent flash storage arrays

The National Security Agency (NSA) is only holding back a teeny, tiny number of code secrets, with director Admiral Mike Rogers promising the world the spook collective shares ‘most’ of the vulnerabilities it finds.

The agency head made the remarks on his second visit to Silicon Valley since his appointment in April this year.

Admiral Rogers told students delegates that US President Barack Obama asked the agency that it should share more of its vulnerabilities with the public.

“The president has been very specific to us in saying ‘the balance I want you to strike will be largely focused on when you find vulnerabilities, we’re going to share them’,” Admiral Rogers said Monday.

“By orders of magnitude, when we find new vulnerabilities, we share them.”

He said there were “some instances” when it would not disclose bugs, Kaspersky’s ThreatPost reported, depending on how “foundational and widespread” a vulnerability was, and who it affected.

“Is it something you tend to find in one nation state? How likely are others to find it? Is this the only way for us to generate those insights we need or is there another alternative we could use?” Rogers said. “Those answers shape the decision.”

The statement did not reveal the agency as a warm-and-fuzzy disseminator of vulnerabilities, given that disclosing the most valuable bugs (according to Admiral Rogers’ analysis) would hinder its offensive hacking spy wing.

Echoing his newly-minted British GCHQ counterpart Robert Hannigan, Admiral Rogers took aim at technology companies which had laden their products and services with encryption in a bid to gain favour with an increasingly privacy aware public still smarting from the Snowden spy disclosures.

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NSA director: We share most of the [crap] bugs we find!



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