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File Photo of Information & Broadcasting Minister Prakash Javadekar

“We believe that press freedom is the essence of democracy. And to make democracy a success, we require this press freedom because it gives people the choice in a rainbow of differing opinions,” the Minister said.

He recalled restrictions imposed on media during the Emergency and said that he was among those who had opposed it.

“There is no external regulation which works in media”, he said.

“In 1975, the media freedom was trampled with, but we fought against it. The people fought against it and I personally was very active on this front because I belong to a family of journalists and therefore we fought and were in jail for sixteen months,” he said.

Mr Javadekar said that dissent has its place in democracy and added that the government would welcome constructive criticism.

The I&B minister said Prime Minister Narendra Modi had been saying that to run a government, a majority is needed, but to run the country, cooperation of all is required.

Speaking to the media, Mr Javadekar said that it is a joint mission to see that India prospers to its potential by 2025 and progresses much further by 2030.

“These will be important landmarks,” he said.

When asked about remarks reportedly made by his predecessor Manish Tewari, that the I&B ministry belonged to a past era, Mr Javdekar replied that an institution can be brought to an end quickly but it takes time to nurture the work culture in an institution.

Link:
Press Freedom a Must, No External Regulation: Prakash Javadekar

Modi government believes in freedom of press as it is the essence of democracy and no “external” regulation has worked in media, Information and Broadcasting minister Prakash Javadekar today said on his first day in office.

“We believe that press freedom is the essence of democracy. And to make democracy a success, we require this press freedom because it gives people the choice in a rainbow of differing opinions,” the Minister said.

He recalled restrictions imposed on media during the Emergency and said that he was among those who had opposed it.

“There is no external regulation which works in media. Once in 1975, the media freedom was trampled upon but we fought against it. The people fought against it and I personally was very active on this front because I belong to a family of journalists and therefore we fought and were in jail for sixteen months,” he said.

Javadekar said that dissent has its place in democracy and added that the government would welcome constructive criticism.

The I&B minister said Prime Minister Narendra Modi had been saying that to run a government a majority is needed but to run the country cooperation of all is required.

Speaking to mediapersons, Javadekar said that it is a joint mission to see that India prospers to its potential by 2025 and progresses much further by 2030.

“These will be important landmarks,” he said.

When queried about remarks reportedly made by his predecessor Manish Tewari that the I&B ministry belonged to a past era, Javdekar replied that an institution can be brought to an end quickly but it takes time to nurture work culture in an institution.

He said that he would study in detail issues related to his ministry and then give a presentation to the Prime Minister after which a course for the future would be charted out.

See the rest here:
Freedom of Press Essence of Democracy: I&B Minister



Still Report # 261 NSA Spying on Bahamas
The NSA records ALL cell calls to, from and even within the Bahamas – all without the permission of the government. Please consider supporting us there for a…

By: Bill Still

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Still Report # 261 NSA Spying on Bahamas – Video

May 262014

Documents released by US whistle blower Edward Snowden allegedly show New Zealand links to mass surveillance from overseas spy agencies, a new book on his revelations show.

The documents were published in journalist Glenn Greenwalds book, No Place to Hide, which tells the story of Snowdens disclosures.

Links between NZ and NSA have been revealed before, when Snowden said last year that NZ was involved in mass spying. The New Zealand Government

One NSA document told New Zealands security services and those of other Five Eyes nations to “sniff it all, know it all, collect it all, process it all and exploit it all”.

The Five Eyes is a spying alliance between New Zealand, Britain, Canada, Australia and the United States.

A slideshow showed Government Communications Security Bureau spies how to operate a system that trawled through massive amounts of phone numbers, email addresses and online chat.

Other files state New Zealand was forwarded intercepted phone calls, texts and emails between the Brazilian president and her staff.

GCSB was also briefed on NSAs efforts to put back doors into private companies computer networks, and given access to a program called Homing Pigeon which allowed in-air passenger jet conversations to be monitored, according to the book.

Spy boss Ian Fletcher last week refused to confirm if Snowden had files relating to New Zealand and if so, what they contained.

Prime Minister John Key has earlier said he had no concerns about Snowden’s revelations, and that they would not challeged the integrity of GCSB.

Go here to see the original:

NSA tells NZ spies: 'Sniff it all'

May 252014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

24th MAY 2014

OFFICIAL STATEMENT BY HAKAINDE HICHILEMA

AFRICAN FREEDOM DAY 2014

On 15 April 1958, in Accra, Ghana, African leaders and political activists gathered at the first Conference of Independent African States. The Conference called for the founding of African Freedom Day, a day to mark each year the onward progress of the liberation movement, and to symbolize the determination of the People of Africa to free themselves from foreign domination and exploitation. Five years later, specifically On 25 May 1963, leaders of thirty-two then independent African states met to form the Organization of African Unity (OAU). By then more than two-thirds of the continent had achieved independence, from imperial European states. This meeting changed the African freedom day date from 15 April to 25 May. The day was then declared African Liberation day. This is very significant in the sense that indeed Africans must be liberated in line with their own aspirations. The question is; has Africa achieved the aspirations of its founding leaders in this regard? Have the negative experiences we as a people went through under the york of colonialism been reversed?

Independence for African countries came at a great cost. Gallant men and women shed their blood for our independence. We saw in the initial stages of independence that we the African people enjoyed political freedom while we continued to grapple with economic freedom. Within a few years of independence, we saw the greed of the few leaders exceed the needs of the majority of the people. Political freedoms were quickly taken away. Ruling parties declared countries one party states. This period was characterised by an unprecedented levels of political oppression where the state machinery was used to silence any form of dissent, in many cases, brutally. Ruling parties soon blurred the line between the party and the government, creating a state of affairs where state resources became party resources firmly controlled by the ruling class. Political sycophancy became the order of the day. Zambia was no exception to this unfortunate dark era of political intolerance. Dissenting voices were brutally crashed. The nation was put under a perpetual state of emergency which was used with swift ruthlessness. Zambians against all odds rose against the system and dismantled the one party system in 1990. We saw a serious attempt to reverse this gain during the failed third term project.

We are now seeing a very worrying trend in Zambia where opposition party political meetings are being disrupted by the highly compromised police formation. Opposition leaders are being dragged before courts of law on flimsy charges. Innocent Zambians gathering to accompany their political leaders are being overrun by vehicles, assassination attempts have become the order of the day. The list of the evidence that shows the reversal of political freedoms are too numerous for one message.

No serious attempt is being made in Africa generally and in Zambia particularly to give the people economic freedom. Life has been reduced to dog eat dog to survive. The basic social services such as education, health, water and sanitation are all in free fall. If people cannot receive quality education, cannot access health care and do not have access to clean water and sanitation facilities, what sort of liberation are we talking about? If people cannot criticize the Government openly without fear of victimization, then what kind of liberation are we talking about? Africa has some of the longest serving Presidents, most of whom (if not all) have manipulated constitutions to perpetuate themselves in power. Africa has the indignity of having six of the of top ten worlds longest serving Presidents in the world. The longest serving President the world over, at 37 years and still counting, is from Africa. Such a record is not something to be proud about.

What do we promise as UPND? There can be no liberation if people are not economically liberated. We therefore promise economic liberation by enacting laws that will guarantee citizens participation in the economic activities of the country. We also promise the citizens free quality education. People have to be educated to make informed decisions including choosing the kind of leaders they want. We promise quality health care. We cannot have an educated people, who are economically liberated but not healthy. That will affect productivity negatively. We promise a Zambia that will be food secure. We cannot have a people that are in a good economy, educated, health but hungry. Most importantly, what I, Hakainde Hichilema personally promise to deliver, is freedom of expression and assembly through a people driven constitution. My personal commitment and that of our party UPND to a people driven Constitution is unequivocal. Zambia claims to be liberated from colonialism yet the public order act that was used by the colonialists is still in force. We seem to have changed the DJ but left the same music playing with some of it repeating ad infinitum. Countrymen and women, let us take this opportunity to take a hard look of where we are coming from and where we want to go. Where we want to go will then determine what kind of manpower we need to get us there.

Have a blessed day.

More here:
HHs African Freedom Day Message



Peter Schiff 2nd Amendment SMACKDOWN
Download Here: http://www.linkiniz.com Mirror 1: http://bc.vc/2xwV80 The Second Amendment has nothing to do with hunting, it's to keep tyranny and the government in check” – Peter Schiff…

By: Economy Center

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Peter Schiff 2nd Amendment SMACKDOWN – Video



Total Tea Party Takover Of Government Is What We Need
ALEX JONES MAINSTREAM MEDIA against the First Amendment videos.. Please click here to subscribe to my channel.. Economic collapse and financial crisis is ris. Alex Jones covers the absolute…

By: Coming Collapse

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Total Tea Party Takover Of Government Is What We Need – Video



How the Government Tracks You: NSA Surveillance – Clean
NSA Video for APUSH.

By: ashraj98

See the article here:

How the Government Tracks You: NSA Surveillance – Clean – Video

This June 6, 2013, file photo shows the sign outside the National Security Agency campus in Fort Meade, Md. A presidential advisory panel has recommended dozens of changes to the government’s surveillance programs, including stripping the NSA of its ability to store Americans’ telephone records and requiring a court to sign off on the individual searches of phone and Internet data.AP/File

WASHINGTON The House on Thursday passed legislation to end the National Security Agency’s bulk collection of American phone records, the first legislative response to the disclosures by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

Although the compromise measure was significantly “watered down,” in the words of Democrat Jan Schakowsky of Illinois, it passed by a vote of 303 to 120, with 9 members not voting.

“We must not let the perfect be the enemy of the good,” Schakowsky, an intelligence committee member, said in summing up the feelings of many Republicans and Democrats who voted for the measure but wanted tougher provisions. Dropped from the bill was a requirement for an independent public advocate on the secret intelligence court that oversees the NSA.

The USA Freedom Act would codify a proposal made in January by President Barack Obama, who said he wanted to end the NSA’s practice of collecting the “to and from” records of nearly every American landline telephone call under a program that searched the data for connections to terrorist plots abroad.

The bill instructs the phone companies to hold the records for 18 months–which they already were doing– and lets the NSA search them in terrorism investigations in response to a judicial order. The phone program was revealed last year by Snowden, who used his job as a computer network administrator to remove tens of thousands of secret documents from an NSA facility in Hawaii.

The measure now heads to the Senate. Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., the chairwoman of the intelligence committee, has said she is willing to go along with a similar idea.

NSA officials were pleased with the bill because under the existing program, they did not have access to many mobile phone records. Under the new arrangement, they will, officials say.

“I believe this is a workable compromise that protects the core function of a counter terrorism program we know has saved lives around the world,” said Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Mich., the House Intelligence Committee chairman.

Privacy and civil liberties activists denounced the measure, saying it had been “gutted” to win agreement from lawmakers such as Rogers who supported the NSA phone records program.

Originally posted here:

House approves bill curbing NSA phone data collection

This June 6, 2013, file photo shows the sign outside the National Security Agency campus in Fort Meade, Md. A presidential advisory panel has recommended dozens of changes to the government’s surveillance programs, including stripping the NSA of its ability to store Americans’ telephone records and requiring a court to sign off on the individual searches of phone and Internet data.AP/File

WASHINGTON The House on Thursday passed legislation to end the National Security Agency’s bulk collection of American phone records, the first legislative response to the disclosures by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

Although the compromise measure was significantly “watered down,” in the words of Democrat Jan Schakowsky of Illinois, it passed by a vote of 303 to 120, with 9 members not voting.

“We must not let the perfect be the enemy of the good,” Schakowsky, an intelligence committee member, said in summing up the feelings of many Republicans and Democrats who voted for the measure but wanted tougher provisions. Dropped from the bill was a requirement for an independent public advocate on the secret intelligence court that oversees the NSA.

The USA Freedom Act would codify a proposal made in January by President Barack Obama, who said he wanted to end the NSA’s practice of collecting the “to and from” records of nearly every American landline telephone call under a program that searched the data for connections to terrorist plots abroad.

The bill instructs the phone companies to hold the records for 18 months–which they already were doing– and lets the NSA search them in terrorism investigations in response to a judicial order. The phone program was revealed last year by Snowden, who used his job as a computer network administrator to remove tens of thousands of secret documents from an NSA facility in Hawaii.

The measure now heads to the Senate. Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., the chairwoman of the intelligence committee, has said she is willing to go along with a similar idea.

NSA officials were pleased with the bill because under the existing program, they did not have access to many mobile phone records. Under the new arrangement, they will, officials say.

“I believe this is a workable compromise that protects the core function of a counter terrorism program we know has saved lives around the world,” said Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Mich., the House Intelligence Committee chairman.

Privacy and civil liberties activists denounced the measure, saying it had been “gutted” to win agreement from lawmakers such as Rogers who supported the NSA phone records program.

Here is the original post:

House approves curbs on NSA record-gathering



Andreas Antonopoulos – Government not a threat to Bitcoin
Send your love mail to adam@adamvstheman.com Please support AVTM by liking this video, subscribing, and donating at: http://adamvstheman.com/invest Provoke s…

By: AdamKokesh

Originally posted here:

Andreas Antonopoulos – Government not a threat to Bitcoin – Video



first amendment government project 2014
Project for my government class.

By: kaitlynz12496

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first amendment government project 2014 – Video



NSA Government it' on 'blew Zuckerberg
latest mobiles updation-cartech-benzcars.

By: zirtee

Read this article:

NSA Government it’ on ‘blew Zuckerberg – Video

This June 6, 2013, file photo shows the sign outside the National Security Agency campus in Fort Meade, Md. A presidential advisory panel has recommended dozens of changes to the government’s surveillance programs, including stripping the NSA of its ability to store Americans’ telephone records and requiring a court to sign off on the individual searches of phone and Internet data.AP/File

WASHINGTON The House is poised to take the first significant step to change the National Security Agency’s bulk collection of American phone records, a compromise bill that is displeasing many civil liberties activists.

The USA Freedom Act would codify a proposal made in January by President Barack Obama, who said he wanted to end the NSA’s practice of collecting the “to and from” records of nearly every American landline telephone call under a program that searched the data for connections to terrorist plots abroad.

The bill, scheduled for a House vote Thursday, instructs the phone companies to hold the records for 18 months and let the NSA search them in terrorism investigations in response to a judicial order. The program was revealed last year by former NSA analyst Edward Snowden.

“The bill’s significant reforms would provide the public greater confidence in our programs and the checks and balances in the system,” the White House said in a statement Wednesday endorsing the legislation.

Privacy and civil liberties activists denounced the measure, saying it had been “gutted” to win agreement from lawmakers, particularly on the Intelligence Committee, who supported the NSA phone records program.

“This legislation was designed to prohibit bulk collection, but has been made so weak that it fails to adequately protect against mass, untargeted collection of Americans’ private information,” Nuala O’Connor, president and CEO of the Center for Democracy and Technology, said in a statement.

“The bill now offers only mild reform and goes against the overwhelming support for definitively ending bulk collection,” she added.

House Intelligence Committee member Rep. Adam Schiff, a Democrat who represents a liberal district outside of Los Angeles, said the bill is perhaps the most significant action Congress will take in response to the Snowden leaks. The former NSA contractor handed journalists documents that revealed a host of once-secret NSA surveillance programs, including some that sweep in the personal information of Americans even as they target foreigners.

Outrage over the programs that Snowden publicized brought together conservatives and liberals who favor civil liberties, while the administration and congressional leadership resisted changing what they considered a useful counterterror tool.

See the original post:

House to vote on bill curbing NSA phone data collection

Edward Snowden. Photo: Barton Gellman for The Washington Post, via Getty

It was December 11, 2012, and in a small art space behind a furniture store in Honolulu, NSA contractor Edward Snowden was working to subvert the machinery of global surveillance.

Snowden was not yet famous. His blockbuster leaks were still six months away, but the man destined to confront world leaders on a global stage was addressing a much smaller audience that Sunday evening. He was leading a local Crypto Party, teaching less than two dozen Hawaii residents how to encrypt their hard drives and use the internet anonymously.

He introduced himself as Ed, says technologist and writer Runa Sandvik, who co-presented with Snowden at the event, and spoke about the experience for the first time with WIRED. We talked for a bit before everything started. And I remember asking where he worked or what he did, and he didnt really want to tell.

The grassroots crypto party movement began in 2011 with a Melbourne, Australia-based activist who goes by Asher Wolf. The idea was for technologists versed in software like Tor and PGP to get together with activists, journalists, and anyone else with a real-life need for those tools and show them the ropes. By the end of 2012, thered been more than 1,000 such parties in countries around the world, by Wolfs count. They were non-political and open to anyone.

Dont exclude anybody, Wolf says. Invite politicians. Invite people you wouldnt necessarily expect. It was about being practical. By the end of the session, they should have Tor installed and be able to use OTR and PGP.

The site of Edward Snowdens December, 2012 Crypto Party. Image: Google Street View

That Snowden organized such an event himself while still an NSA contract worker speaks volumes about his motives. Since the Snowden revelations began in June 2013, the whistleblower has been accused in editorial pages, and even the halls of Congress, of being a spy for China or Russia. A recent Wall Street Journal column argues that Snowden might have been working for the Russians and Chinese at the same time. [O]nly a handful of the secrets had anything to do with domestic surveillance by the government and most were of primary value to an espionage operation.

For the most part, these attacks have bounced harmlessly off Snowden, deflected by the Teflon of his well-managed public appearances and the self-evident risk and sacrifice he took on. One notable exception came last month, when Snowden submitted a video question to a televised town hall with Russian president Vladamir Putin; his question to Putin about Russias surveillance apparatus came across as a softball, and for a moment Snowden looked like a prop in Putins stage show.

But regardless of what you think of his actions, Snowdens intentions are harder to doubt when you know that even before he leaked hundreds of thousands of documents to expose the surveillance world, he spent two hours calmly teaching 20 of his neighbors how to protect themselves from it. Even as he was thinking globally, he was acting locally. Its like coming home to find the director of Greenpeace starting a mulch pit in your backyard.

Here is the original post:

Snowdens First Move Against the NSA Was a Party in Hawaii

Japan And Solomon Islands Signs Multi-Million Dollar Seaport Project

The Governments of Japan and Solomon Islands today signed a multi-million dollar project to expand facilities at the Honiara International Seaport.

The new project will include the construction of a second international wharf, which will enable the Honiara Port to become one of the largest sea-port hubs in the region.

Japanese Ambassador and Charge dAffaires to Solomon Islands Kenichi Kimiya and Foreign Affairs Minister Clay Forau signed the documents which have now significantly paved the way for the start of the project.

The documents constitutes legally binding International Agreements between Japan and Solomon Islands, which secures a grant of two billion six hundred and eighty-one million Japanese Yen (approx. SBD190 million) for construction works by the Government of Japan.

Todays signing was done following the successful completion of the design phase which was signed and implemented on 17th January 2014. The Japanese Cabinet has approved the detailed design in April this year which totalled to SB$190 million.

The Project marks a new partnership between the two countries. It provides direct and strategic impacts on connectivity for Solomon Islands with regional and global economies to effectively benefit the populations of Solomon Islands, said Ambassador Kimiya today.

The Project aims to expand the port facilities including the construction of the second international wharf, which enables the Honiara Port to become one of the largest hub ports in the region.

Working closely with development partners who have been paying efforts to improve performance, governance and accountability of the State-Owned Enterprises, including the Solomon Islands Port Authority (SIPA), the overall capacity of the Honiara Port will be strengthened by these efforts both on hard and soft aspects.

Minister Forau also signed a Grant Agreement with JICA representative Taiji Usui during the ceremony today.

See more here:
Japan And Solomon Islands Sign Seaport Project



Shutting Down BNP Free Speech is a Moral Duty
In order to remain human, you have to take sides. Seeing as Britain First/BNP are Queen loving, patriotic types, my dislike of Government extends to them as well. If you want a truly revolutionary…

By: Charles Veitch

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Shutting Down BNP Free Speech is a Moral Duty – Video

May 20, 2014

NEW YORK: Several bitcoin exchanges including the now-defunct Mt Gox received subpoenas from Manhattan federal prosecutors this winter as they look into possible ties between the exchanges and the online drug market Silk Road, the Wall Street Journal reported yesterday day, citing people familiar with the matter.

The subpoenas to Mt Gox demanded customer-transaction logs and materials related to solicitation of investors. The report did not mention any other bitcoin businesses that received subpoenas.

Mt Goxs lawyers advised Chief Executive Officer Mark Karpeles against going to the United States after he was summoned by a judge there to testify for a class-action lawsuit, because they were concerned he would be arrested in connection with this case.

The prosecutors and Federal Bureau of Investigation agents are examining whether the exchange and others like it may have processed transactions connected to Silk Road, the people said.

The investigation was at an early stage and there were no conclusions yet on whether the exchanges were connected with Silk Road, one of the people familiar with the matter told the paper.

Last month, prominent bitcoin entrepreneur Charlie Shrem was indicted by a federal grand jury in New York on charges of funneling cash to Silk Road.

Shrem, one of the digital currencys most visible promoters, is accused of conspiring with a Florida man, Robert Faiella, to sell more than US$1 million in bitcoin to the users of Silk Road despite knowing that it would be spent on illegal activities including drug trafficking.

It was preceded by the arrest of alleged Silk Road founder Ross Ulbricht in San Francisco last year when he was charged in federal court in Manhattan with counts relating to drug trafficking, money laundering and computer hacking, all stemming from his alleged involvement in the illicit online marketplace, which sold drugs and criminal services in exchange for bitcoin. After Ulbrichts arrest, the government shut down the website.

– Reuters

See the original post:

WSJ: US authorities probe bitcoin exchanges over illegal transactions

Cowboys move cattle northwest of Calgary, May 28, 2013. Canadian cattle producers were in a U.S. court Monday, arguing for their right to free speech under the First Amendment. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

image credit:

By Alexander Panetta, The Canadian Press

WASHINGTON – Canadian livestock producers were in a U.S. courtroom Monday fighting against labelling requirements blamed for having devastated their exports.

Their case invoked one of America’s most cherished principles: the free-speech guarantee in the First Amendment of the Constitution. The public gallery was filled as close to 200 people came to hear the argument in the U.S. Court of Appeals, the second-highest court in the country.

According to a coalition of industry groups from the three North American countries, foundational speech rights are violated when meat companies are forced to stamp, “Born in Canada,” or “Born in Mexico,” on their packaging.

They say country-of-origin labelling isn’t just costly, from a logistical standpoint. They say it also amounts to the government forcing them to divulge information, against their will and without justification, in breach of the principles espoused by America’s founding fathers.

The multiple parties with standing in the case were represented by a pair of attorneys: a federal lawyer who argued on behalf of the U.S. government, against an opponent who represented meat-industry groups.

The industry attorney argued that the rules are nothing more than protectionism, disguised as an attempt to help consumers learn about the origin of their food. She said the rules did not meet the standard set by past court cases about what corporations need to disclose.

“We’re here representing ranchers who are feeling a colossal impact,” said Catherine Stetson, arguing for the American Meat Institute and its Canadian-Mexican allies.

Follow this link:
Canada-U.S. meat flap takes free-speech twist

Cisco Systems’ CEO John Chambers has written to U.S. President Barack Obama, asking for his intervention so that U.S. technology sales are not affected by a loss in trust as a result of reports of surveillance by the U.S. National Security Agency.

The letter follows reports that even as the U.S. warned customers that Chinese networking equipment may be used to spy on them, the NSA physically intercepted routers, servers and other network equipment to plant surveillance tools before repackaging the devices with a factory seal and sending the products to international customers.

[ PathSolutions solves the network monitoring maze -- and nets an InfoWorld Test Center Editor's Choice. | Pick up expert networking how-to advice from InfoWorld's Networking Deep Dive PDF special report and Technology: Networking newsletter. ]

“We simply cannot operate this way, our customers trust us to be able to deliver to their doorsteps products that meet the highest standards of integrity and security,” Chambers wrote in the letter to Obama, dated May 15, which was published by news website Re/code. “We understand the real and significant threats that exist in this world, but we must also respect the industry’s relationship of trust with our customers.”

A Cisco spokesman confirmed Sunday that the letter had been sent to Obama.

Referring to the reports, including a photograph of what appeared to be a Cisco package being tampered with, Chambers said if the allegations are true, the actions will weaken confidence in the ability of technology companies to deliver products worldwide.

Chambers asked the Obama administration to take a leadership role and ensure that guidelines and reforms are put into place that “can be honored across the globe.”

Referring to the reports that IT products including from Cisco were being compromised on their way to customers, Cisco’s General Counsel Mark Chandler wrote in a blog post last week that the company complies with U.S. laws, like those of many other countries, which limit exports to certain customers and destinations.

“We ought to be able to count on the government to then not interfere with the lawful delivery of our products in the form in which we have manufactured them,” he added.

In December, eight top technology companies including Microsoft, Google, Facebook and Yahoo called for the reform around the world of government surveillance laws and practices, and asked the U.S. to take the lead. Some Internet companies were charged in disclosures last year by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden of providing to the NSA real-time access to contents on their servers, which the companies denied. There were also reports that the agency was tapping into communications links between the data centers of Yahoo and Google.

Read more from the original source:

Cisco CEO tells Obama: NSA spying impacts technology sales



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