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Boston Marathon Bombs. Illuminati Freemason Symbolism. Russia and WW3 are coming.
An investigative look into the Boston Area Showing Russia Coming to Start the NWO and do the Mark of the Beast. The USA is going to be Invaded. Revelation …

By: TheGroxt1

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Boston Marathon Bombs. Illuminati Freemason Symbolism. Russia and WW3 are coming. – Video

B. Scott arrives to the 25th Annual GLAAD in Los Angeles in April 2014.

FORTUNE — In August 2013, transgender television personality B. Scott filed a suit against Black Entertainment Television and its parent company Viacom Inc., claiming that the network had discriminated against him based on his gender identity and sexual orientation.

The lawsuit stemmed from Scott’s appearance as a style correspondent at the 2013 BET awards preshow. After his first segment of the night, in which he appeared with heavy makeup and heels, the network told him to tone down his look and change into masculine clothing that was “different from the androgynous style he’s used to … and comfortable with,” according to the complaint.

A Los Angeles Superior Court judge decided the case Wednesday, and it came down to theFirst Amendment; not Scott’s freedom to speech and expression, but Viacom’s (VIA).The court found that BET’s decision as to how Scott would appear on camera was part of the network’s creative process of developing and broadcasting the show, which is protected by the First Amendment.

MORE:Americans have fallen in love with real estate once again

The case is by no means the first in which a media company has used the First Amendment as a defenseagainst lawsuits alleging discrimination. The order on Thursday cites several other instances.

There was the racial discrimination case against ABC for its failure to feature non-white contestants on The Bachelorand The Bachelorette. A federal district court in Tennessee dismissed the matter after finding that “casting decisions are a necessary component of any entertainment show’s creative content.” The court said that “the plaintiffs seek to drive an artificial wedge between casting decisions and the end product, which itself is indisputably protected as speech by the First Amendment.”

And there was the lawsuit filed against Warner Bros. by a former writers’ assistant for the television show Friendswho asserted that the use of sexually coarse and vulgar language and conduct by the show’s writers constituted sexual harassment. The Supreme Court of California in that case held that “the First Amendment protects creativity.”

The case thatheld greatestprecedent is a matter in which a group of gay, lesbian, and bisexual Irish Americans sought to participate in Boston’s St. Patrick’s Day parade. The U.S. Supreme Court, which ultimately heard the case, ruled that it would be a violation of the First Amendment for Massachusetts to require private citizens “who organize a parade to include among the marchers a group imparting a message the organizers do not wish to convey.”

The defendants in these cases arguedthat they didn’t care what their employees or participants are in reality — gay, straight, male, female — but rather how they appear. “They say, ‘We are entitled to create a program that looks the way we want it to look,’” says Eugene Volokh, a professor at UCLA School of Law. And the courts have agreed with them.

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To kill bias suits, companies lean on the First Amendment

U.S. taxpayers would need to pay an average of $1,259 more a year to make up the federal and state taxes lost to corporations and individuals sheltering money in overseas tax havens, according to a report.

“Tax haven abusers benefit from America’s markets, public infrastructure, educated workforce, security and rule of law – all supported in one way or another by tax dollars – but they avoid paying for these benefits,” U.S. Public Interest Research Group said in the report released today, the deadline for filing 2013 taxes.

“Instead, ordinary taxpayers end up picking up the tab, either in the form of higher taxes, cuts to public spending priorities, or increases to the federal debt,” it said.

In total, the U.S. loses $150 billion in federal revenue and another $34 billion in state revenue annually because of money parked in tax havens, the Boston-based consumer advocacy group concluded.

That’s almost 5 percent of total federal revenue. The U.S. is projected to raise $3.032 trillion this year, up from $2.775 trillion for fiscal year 2013, according to the Congressional Budget Office.

U.S. PIRG released the report as it tries to increase pressure on lawmakers to change how companies pay taxes on income credited to foreign subsidiaries.

Offshore Accumulations

The largest U.S.-based companies have accumulated $1.95 trillion outside the U.S., up 11.8 percent from a year earlier, according to securities filings from 307 corporations reviewed by Bloomberg News.

Together, they added $206 billion to their stockpiles of offshore profits last year, leaving earnings in low-tax countries until Congress gives them a reason not to. Three multinational firms — Microsoft Corp., Apple Inc. and International Business Machines Corp. — added $37.5 billion, or 18.2 percent of the total increase.

Prospects have dimmed for a revision of the U.S. tax code this year that would have addressed offshore havens.

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Tax havens leave US filers with $1,259 tab each

U.S. taxpayers would need to pay an average of $1,259 more a year to make up the federal and state taxes lost to corporations and individuals sheltering money in overseas tax havens, according to a report.

Tax haven abusers benefit from Americas markets, public infrastructure, educated workforce, security and rule of law – all supported in one way or another by tax dollars – but they avoid paying for these benefits, U.S. Public Interest Research Group said in the report released today, the deadline for filing 2013 taxes.

Instead, ordinary taxpayers end up picking up the tab, either in the form of higher taxes, cuts to public spending priorities, or increases to the federal debt, it said.

In total, the U.S. loses $150 billion in federal revenue and another $34 billion in state revenue annually because of money parked in tax havens, the Boston-based consumer advocacy group concluded.

Thats almost 5 percent of total federal revenue. The U.S. is projected to raise $3.032 trillion this year, up from $2.775 trillion for fiscal year 2013, according to the Congressional Budget Office.

U.S. PIRG released the report as it tries to increase pressure on lawmakers to change how companies pay taxes on income credited to foreign subsidiaries.

The largest U.S.-based companies have accumulated $1.95 trillion outside the U.S., up 11.8 percent from a year earlier, according to securities filings from 307 corporations reviewed by Bloomberg News.

Together, they added $206 billion to their stockpiles of offshore profits last year, leaving earnings in low-tax countries until Congress gives them a reason not to. Three multinational firms — Microsoft Corp., Apple Inc. and International Business Machines Corp. — added $37.5 billion, or 18.2 percent of the total increase.

Prospects have dimmed for a revision of the U.S. tax code this year that would have addressed offshore havens.

President Barack Obama, House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Dave Camp, a Michigan Republican, and Senate Finance Chairman Ron Wyden, an Oregon Democrat, support lowering the corporate rate and making significant changes to the taxation of foreign income.

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Tax Havens Leave U.S. Filers Thousand-Dollar Tab: Report

U.S. taxpayers would need to pay an average of $1,259 more a year to make up the federal and state taxes lost to corporations and individuals sheltering money in overseas tax havens, according to a report.

Tax haven abusers benefit from Americas markets, public infrastructure, educated workforce, security and rule of law all supported in one way or another by tax dollars but they avoid paying for these benefits, U.S. Public Interest Research Group said in the report released Tuesday, the deadline for filing 2013 taxes.

Instead, ordinary taxpayers end up picking up the tab, either in the form of higher taxes, cuts to public spending priorities, or increases to the federal debt, it said.

In total, the U.S. loses $150 billion in federal revenue and another $34 billion in state revenue annually because of money parked in tax havens, the Boston-based consumer advocacy group concluded.

Thats almost 5 percent of total federal revenue. The U.S. is projected to raise $3.032 trillion this year, up from $2.775 trillion for fiscal year 2013, according to the Congressional Budget Office.

U.S. PIRG released the report as it tries to increase pressure on lawmakers to change how companies pay taxes on income credited to foreign subsidiaries.

The largest U.S.-based companies have accumulated $1.95 trillion outside the U.S., up 11.8 percent from a year earlier, according to securities filings from 307 corporations reviewed by Bloomberg News.

Together, they added $206 billion to their stockpiles of offshore profits last year, leaving earnings in low-tax countries until Congress gives them a reason not to. Three multinational firms Microsoft Corp., Apple Inc. and International Business Machines Corp. added $37.5 billion, or 18.2 percent of the total increase.

Prospects have dimmed for a revision of the U.S. tax code this year that would have addressed offshore havens.

President Obama, House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Dave Camp, a Michigan Republican, and Senate Finance Chairman Ron Wyden, an Oregon Democrat, support lowering the corporate rate and making significant changes to the taxation of foreign income.

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Tax haven abuse costs U.S. filers billions

Any day now, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in a free-speech case that could cement a dangerous precedent one establishing a de facto double standard in governments favor.

The case stems from the election season of 2004, when a group of 200 or so protesters showed up near a Jacksonville, Ore., restaurant where George W. Bush was eating. They started chanting about Bushs polices on war and the environment. After 15 minutes or so, the Secret Service decided that was enough anti-Bush speech for the day. Agents instructed local law enforcement to move the demonstrators which was done, with riot police firing plastic bullets.

A pro-Bush demonstration nearby was allowed to continue unimpeded.

Michael Mookie Moss and his anti-Bush compadres have a strong claim that the disparate treatment violated their First Amendment rights. But they are spitting into the wind of a two-year-old precedent. In 2012, the Supreme Court said Secret Service agents enjoyed qualified immunity in arresting Steven Howard, who accosted Vice President Dick Cheney and told him his policies in Iraq are disgusting.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg wrote that officers assigned to protect public officials must make singularly swift, on-the-spot, decisions whether the safety of the person they are guarding is in jeopardy. In performing that protective function, they rightly take into account words spoken to, or in the proximity of, the person whose safety is their charge.

You can see the sense in that. At the same time, though, you can see how such a policy creates a bias in favor of the government: People who oppose the incumbent partys policies are more likely to be considered potential threats than people who support them.

A similar problem bedevils the 35-foot-buffer zone around Massachusetts abortion clinics that the high court also is scrutinizing this term. Defenders of the buffer zone claim it does not violate the Constitution because it is a neutral rule that applies to everyone and is meant merely to ensure safe access to abortion clinics. As Boston Globe writer Jeff Jacoby noted earlier this year, that concern is understandably taken seriously in the state where John Salvi murdered two employees of Planned Parenthood clinics in 1994.

But as Jacoby also notes, murder, the use of physical force and even the threat of physical force are already against the law. Federal law prohibits obstructing access to a clinic. The Massachusetts buffer zone, then, seems designed to protect potential clients from the discomfort of close proximity to abortion protesters.

That impression was reinforced during oral arguments, when Justice Samuel Alito hypothesized two women within the buffer zone one telling a potential client this is a safe facility, and the other telling her, this is not a safe facility. The only difference between the two, he noted, is that theyve expressed a different viewpoint. Yet under the current statute one of them the anti-abortion protester has violated Massachusetts law and the other has not. Once again, a safety rationale enables viewpoint discrimination.

Many American universities are subordinating free speech not merely to physical safety but to emotional equilibrium. The problem extends beyond campus speech codes and free-speech zones, both of which have received considerable attention in recent years. On many campuses, certain viewpoints are considered so inherently offensive that they require silencing.

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Free speech case triggers dangerous precedent



Monster storm slams Cape, Islands
A monster spring storm is slamming the Cape and Islands on Wednesday, even collapsing a historic building in Chatham.

By: WCVB Channel 5 Boston

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Monster storm slams Cape, Islands – Video



Turnover Web | SEO Services| International SEO | SMO| SEM| SMM| PPC Services
http://www.turnoverweb.com – SEO, SMO, SMM Services.

By: Turnover Boston

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Turnover Web | SEO Services| International SEO | SMO| SEM| SMM| PPC Services – Video

Liberty Interactive Corporation announced thatMike George, President and CEO ofQVC, Inc., will be presenting at the UBS Global Consumer Conference, onThursday, March 13th at11:20 a.m., Eastern Timeat TheFour Seasons Boston Hotel in Boston, MA.

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Liberty Interactive Corporation to Present at UBS Global Consumer Conference

Robert Bertsche, executive committee member of the New England First Amendment Coalition, presenting Darien mother Kit Savage with the Antonia Orfield Citizenship Award for her efforts to help children with disabilities.

Kit Savage was one of the first parents to recognize problems in Dariens special education program. And now, her efforts to improve transparency and access to education have been recognized, as the New England First Amendment Coalition recently honored her with the inaugural Antonia Orfield Citizenship Award.

I am the parent of two children with disabilities, Savage told a room full of hundreds of journalists, lawyers and free speech advocates in Boston on Friday, Feb. 7. I am honored to sit with the close family and friends of Dr. Orfield and hear how she helped children overcome their vision issues to learn to read.

The award is named after Dr. Antonia Orfield, a mother and optometrist who worked to improve the schools in Chicago. Orfield used non-surgical vision therapy methods to help children with vision-related learning disabilities. She published her findings in her 2007 book, Eyes for Learning.

Presenting the award to Savage was Robert Bertsche, a First Amendment lawyer and member of the coalitions executive committee.

It is very fitting that Kit Savage receives this award in the first year since it has been renamed in memory of the late Dr. Antonia Orfield, Bertsche said. Like Kit Savage, her advocacy had a tie to children and learning differences.

Rosanna Cavanagh, executive director of the first amendment coalition, said her group recognizes that citizens play a crucial role in guaranteeing government accountability.

Savage was one of the original 25 parents to sign the complaint with the state Department of Education, alleging systemic violations to federal special education law. Those allegations were confirmed in a two-part state investigation, and further detailed in an independent probe.

In the early years, most of us are jumping hurdle after hurdle to identify and treat whatever challenges we can that are impacting our child, Savage said. Generally speaking we take on this all-consuming job quietly and in the privacy of our homes.

Top 10 of 2013: No. 1 Special education

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Free speech group honors Darien mother with citizenship award



Children of Liberty – The Voices of Boston
Meet the voice cast for Children of Liberty, the upcoming historical stealth game from Lantana Games. Voice Casting, Recording, and Post Production by Reacti…

By: lantanagames

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Children of Liberty – The Voices of Boston – Video

Liberty Property Trust plans to charge rents “that are high $30s [per square foot], kissing $40,” to Comcast and any additional tenants for the company’s planned second Center City office tower, Liberty boss Bill Hankowsky told investors during a conference call this week.

That’s higher than today’s top asking rents for the priciest Philadelphia space. In Philadelphia’s slow-grow office market, average leasing costs are little changed since the 1990s, and significantly lower than in New York, Boston or Washington. The new Comcast tower is a step up.

“Obviously, higher floors will charge more than lower floors,” Hankowsky added.

What happens to Philadelphia’s office market when Liberty opens the 59-story Comcast Innovation and Technology Center at 1800 Arch St. and Brandywine Realty Trust builds the 47-story FMC Corp. tower planned for 30th and Walnut? asked Craig Mailman, analyst at KeyBanc Capital Markets.

The FMC and Comcast moves could dump up to 800,000 square feet of office space onto the market — or less: Hankowsky noted that Comcast might take the whole new building, as it did with its first tower in 2005, reducing the vacancy.

He’s hoping Comcast, plus Center City’s rising population of educated young people, will attract more tech employers to fill empty offices. And he expects old buildings will continue to “convert to hotels and apartment buildings.” In short, “I don’t see a problem.”

Hankowsky, who is an owner of The Inquirer, also confirmed that Comcast has bought out a unit of German’s Commerzbank AG and now owns 80 percent of its original headquarters tower; Comcast will own the same proportion of the new tower, with Liberty owning the rest of both.

John W. Guinee, analyst at Stifel & Co., asked for more detailed cost projections. Hankowsky said he can’t say much more than what was in the news release. He noted the planned Four Seasons Hotel space atop the tower will cost more than the office space, on a per-square-foot basis. Also, Comcast, not Liberty, will likely spend “several hundred million more” fitting out its new space beyond the $900 million construction cost, he added.

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PhillyDeals: High rents forecast for Comcast tower

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BOSTON (AP) A new report is warning that improvements in the quality of beaches in the metropolitan Boston area in recent years are being threatened by budget and staffing cuts to the state agency overseeing them.

A draft report by the Metropolitan Beaches Commission obtained by The Associated Press is calling for the hiring of more full-time and seasonal employees, from beach managers to workers who help clean the sand.

The report also makes a series of recommendations about ways to improve the seaside experience, including instituting trolley shuttle services to some beaches, allowing kayak rentals and enhancing bicycle and pedestrian connections between beaches.

State Sen. Thomas McGee, co-chairman of the commission, said many of the beaches were in rough shape before the commission issued its first recommendations in 2007. He said the state was able to make real progress, and the investments made a difference.

McGee said its important not to let those improvements slip away.

We need to go from beaches that are good to beaches that are great, he said. We heard that loud and clear. If they can go to the beaches and really enjoy them, people understand that we are doing the right thing.

Bruce Berman of the group Save the Harbor/Save the Bay, which worked with the commission, said staffing levels at the Department of Conservation and Recreation have slipped in recent years as the state faced tighter budgets.

The bad news is that the gains we made are at risk because of the erosion of DCRs budget during the recession, Berman said.

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Report: Mass. Beaches Imperiled By Budget Cuts

By STEVE LeBLANC/Associated Press/February 1, 2014

BOSTON (AP) A new report is warning that improvements in the quality of beaches in the metropolitan Boston area in recent years are being threatened by budget and staffing cuts to the state agency overseeing them.

A draft report by the Metropolitan Beaches Commission obtained by The Associated Press is calling for the hiring of more full-time and seasonal employees, from beach managers to workers who help clean the sand.

The report also makes a series of recommendations about ways to improve the seaside experience, including instituting trolley shuttle services to some beaches, allowing kayak rentals and enhancing bicycle and pedestrian connections between beaches.

State Sen. Thomas McGee, co-chairman of the commission, said many of the beaches were in rough shape before the commission issued its first recommendations in 2007. He said the state was able to make real progress, and the investments made a difference.

McGee said its important not to let those improvements slip away.

We need to go from beaches that are good to beaches that are great, he said. We heard that loud and clear. If they can go to the beaches and really enjoy them, people understand that we are doing the right thing.

Bruce Berman of the group Save the Harbor/Save the Bay, which worked with the commission, said staffing levels at the Department of Conservation and Recreation have slipped in recent years as the state faced tighter budgets.

The bad news is that the gains we made are at risk because of the erosion of DCRs budget during the recession, Berman said.

The report warns that chronic underfunding of DCR as a whole challenges its ability to meet its commitments to public and its mission as an agency and that an extra $7 million to $10 million made be needed in annual operating funds to meet those commitments.

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Report: Mass. beaches are imperiled by budget cuts

BOSTON A new report warns that improvements to some beaches in the metropolitan Boston area could be threatened by budget and staffing cuts to the state agency overseeing them. A draft report by the Metropolitan Beaches Commission obtained by The Associated Press is calling for the hiring of more full-time and seasonal employees, from []

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Mass. Beaches Are Imperiled By Budget Cuts



Cape Cod and Islands to see snow Tuesday night
Cindy Fitzgibbon has the latest forecast for Boston, Massachusetts and New England.

By: beeneify

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Cape Cod and Islands to see snow Tuesday night – Video

(Patrick D. Rosso/2014/Boston.com)

By Patrick D. Rosso, Boston.com Staff

The Metropolitan Beaches Commission will reconvene this weekend to take stock of the Commonwealths beaches, including those in South Boston and Dorchester.

On Saturday, Feb. 1, the group will meet at the UMass Boston Campus Center from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.

First formed by the Massachusetts Legislature in 2006, the commission is tasked with evaluating conditions at the 14 Department of Conservation and Recreation beaches that dot the Massachusetts coastline. It is made up of local residents, clean-water advocates, and elected officials and is administered by the non-profit Save the Harbor/Save the Bay.

It released its first report in 2007 and reconvened in 2013 to generate its second report.

On Saturday, the commission will discuss the new report and the recommendations included in it.

The report, in addition to including recommendations from local residents, is also expected to include information provided through an online survey.

Once the report has been officially released, it will be used to guide future initiatives at beaches throughout the Commonwealth.

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Metropolitan Beaches Commission to review 2014 report this weekend



Greater Boston Video: Abortion, Protest Zones And Free Speech
The length of a school bus is the distance protestors must keep between themselves and the door to health care facilities that perform abortions in Massachus…

By: WGBH News

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Greater Boston Video: Abortion, Protest Zones And Free Speech – Video

WASHINGTON In a case pitting free speech against abortion rights, Supreme Court justices signaled Wednesday they were inclined to strike down a Massachusetts law that sets a 35-foot buffer zone to prevent protesters from approaching clinics that offer the procedure.

Opponents called the law a violation of free speech and complained it prohibits “peaceful conversation on a public sidewalk,” said Mark Rienzi, the attorney representing antiabortion activist Eleanor McCullen, 77, from Boston. Calling themselves “sidewalk counselors,” McCullen and other activists stand outside clinic entrances and urge women seeking abortions to change their minds.

An attorney for Massachusetts and the Obama administration defended the law as a reasonable way to deal with the violence and disruptions that have been seen at abortion clinics in the Boston area. They said abortion opponents were free to speak to people who were walking down the street toward the clinic, but the law prevented them from getting close to the entrance.

The buffer-zone restriction applies only to “the last four to five seconds before they enter the clinic,” said Ian Gershengorn, a deputy U.S. solicitor general.

In their comments and questions on McCullen vs. Coakley, however, most of the justices appeared to agree with antiabortion advocates who said a 35-foot buffer zone goes too far. Rienzi argued that rather than imposing a blanket buffer zone at all times, clinics should simply call the police if and when activists are preventing patients from entering.

The court’s conservatives, led by Justice Antonin Scalia, said they thought such a law clearly violated the 1st Amendment. Several of the liberal justices commented that the 35-foot zone may be broader than needed.

This “is a counseling case, not a protest case,” Scalia insisted. “Surely, you could have a law against screaming and shouting within 35 feet. These people want to speak quietly in a friendly manner.”

The court’s ruling could effect similar buffer zones used to protect government and military institutions and activities. Several justices noted that federal law sets a quiet zone around military funerals. Other laws forbid people from confronting those who are entering a polling place or a county courthouse. The Supreme Court enforces a no-protest rule on the marble plaza in front of its building.

In the 1990s, the high court upheld a judge’s orders from Florida that barred antiabortion activists from coming within 36 feet of the doorway of a clinic that had been the scene of loud demonstrations. And in 2000, the court in a 6-3 decision upheld a Colorado law that set a 10-foot buffer zone around abortion clinics.

Then, the three dissenters Justices Anthony M. Kennedy, Clarence Thomas and Scalia said the Colorado law violated the 1st Amendment. Then-Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist and then-Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, who voted with the majority, have since been replaced by President George W. Bush’s two appointees: Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr.

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Supreme Court signals opposition to abortion clinic buffer zone

Sat, 02/01/2014 – 10:00am

On Saturday, February 1, 2014 the Metropolitan Beaches Commission will hold a public meeting at the UMass Boston Campus Center from 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon.

In the summer and fall of 2013, the Metropolitan Beaches Commission, in partnership with Save the Harbor/Save the Bay, held 10 public hearings at the Massachusetts State House and in Nahant, Lynn, Revere, Winthrop, East Boston, South Boston, Dorchester, Quincy, and Hull. Nearly 700 people participated in the hearings and scores more took part in an online survey.

Later this year the Commission will issue its final report. If you are able to attend the Feb. 1 meeting, please take a moment to RSVP by email to info@savetheharbor.org, or by phone to 617-451-2860.

Driving and Parking Directions

The public meeting will take place at UMass Boston, 100 Morrissey Boulevard, Dorchester, MA 02125. It will be held in the Campus Center Building in the 3rd floor Ballroom. There will be parking available in the South Parking Lot for $6. Please note that the parking lot is marked as student parking only, but it is ok to park there for the public meeting. UMass Boston is also accessible by public transportation via the MBTA Red Lines JFK/Umass stop with a 5 minute shuttle ride to campus.

100 Morrissey Blvd.

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Beaches Commission to host public meeting at UMass Boston



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