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Biologic Healing Regenerative Medicine

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Jul 262015
 

Explore your options to find relief through biologic self-healing therapies.

NEW in Hampton Roads: Putting to work a concentration of your OWN stem cells At the Regenerative Medicine Center of APM Spine and Sports Physicians’, in our continuous quest to provide our patients and community with access to the finest, most cutting edge, care, we are now offering some new options to facilitate “biologic healing.” Biologic healing, or what is more commonly referred to as Regenerative Medicine, describes a process by which we assist the body to heal itself using as few pharmaceuticals as possible. We have been providing this service since 1992, when we introduced Prolotherapy to our patients. Then, just over ten years ago, we brought PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma) injection therapy to the area. For the last 10 years, we have gained a lot of experience using Prolotherapy and PRP to promote healing of injured and inflamed tissues that frequently cause pain and limit function.

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Biologic Healing Regenerative Medicine

About Regenerative Medicine Research at the Texas Heart …

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Jul 222015
 

Dr.DorisTayloris involved in both laboratory and clinical studies using cell therapy to treat disease. Almost5 million Americans are living with heart failure and more than half a million new cases are diagnosed annually. Almost 50,000 people die each year while awaiting a heart transplant and, for a decade or more, only about 2,200 heart transplants have been performed in the entire United States. The need is dwarfed by the availability of donor organs.

This is one of the reasons there is such hope placed in the promising field of regenerative medicine. The groundbreaking work of Dr. Taylor and her team has demonstrated the ability in the lab to strip organs, including the heart, of their cellular make-up leaving a decellularized “scaffold.” The heartcan then be re-seeded with cells that, when supplied with blood and oxygen, regenerate the scaffold into a functioning heart. Dr. Taylor calls this using nature’s platform to create a bioartificial heart.

The hope is that this research is an early step toward being able to grow a fully functional human heart in the laboratory. Dr. Taylor has demonstrated that the process works for other organs as well, such as kidney, pancreas, lung, and liver where she has already tested the same approachopening a door in the field of organ transplantation.

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regenerative medicine | Britannica.com

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Jun 302015
 

regenerative medicine,cartilage: bronchus repair using bioartificial tissue transplantationHospital Clinic of Barcelona/APthe application of treatments developed to replace tissues damaged by injury or disease. These treatments may involve the use of biochemical techniques to induce tissue regeneration directly at the site of damage or the use of transplantation techniques employing differentiated cells or stem cells, either alone or as part of a bioartificial tissue. Bioartificial tissues are made by seeding cells onto natural or biomimetic scaffolds (see tissue engineering). Natural scaffolds are the total extracellular matrixes (ECMs) of decellularized tissues or organs. In contrast, biomimetic scaffolds may be composed of natural materials, such as collagen or proteoglycans (proteins with long chains of carbohydrate), or built from artificial materials, such as metals, ceramics, or polyester polymers. Cells used for transplants and bioartificial tissues are almost always autogeneic (self) to avoid rejection by the patients immune system. The use of allogeneic (nonself) cells carries a high risk of immune rejection and therefore requires tissue matching between donor and recipient and involves the administration of immunosuppressive drugs.

A variety of autogeneic and allogeneic cell and bioartificial tissue transplantations have been performed. Examples of autogeneic transplants using differentiated cells include blood transfusion with frozen stores of the patients own blood and repair of the articular cartilage of the knee with the patients own articular chondrocytes (cartilage cells) that have been expanded in vitro (amplified in number using cell culture techniques in a laboratory). An example of a tissue that has been generated for autogeneic transplant is the human mandible (lower jaw). Functional bioartificial mandibles are made by seeding autogeneic bone marrow cells onto a titanium mesh scaffold loaded with bovine bone matrix, a type of extracellular matrix that has proved valuable in regenerative medicine for its ability to promote cell adhesion and proliferation in transplantable bone tissues. Functional bioartificial bladders also have been successfully implanted into patients. Bioartificial bladders are made by seeding a biodegradable polyester scaffold with autogeneic urinary epithelial cells and smooth muscle cells.

Another example of a tissue used successfully in an autogeneic transplant is a bioartificial bronchus, which was generated to replace damaged tissue in a patient affected by tuberculosis. The bioartificial bronchus was constructed from an ECM scaffold of a section of bronchial tissue taken from a donor cadaver. Differentiated epithelial cells isolated from the patient and chondrocytes derived from mesenchymal stem cells collected from the patients bone marrow were seeded onto the scaffold.

There are few clinical examples of allogeneic cell and bioartificial tissue transplants. The two most common allogeneic transplants are blood-group-matched blood transfusion and bone marrow transplant. Allogeneic bone marrow transplants are often performed following high-dose chemotherapy, which is used to destroy all the cells in the hematopoietic system in order to ensure that all cancer-causing cells are killed. (The hematopoietic system is contained within the bone marrow and is responsible for generating all the cells of the blood and immune system.) This type of bone marrow transplant is associated with a high risk of graft-versus-host disease, in which the donor marrow cells attack the recipients tissues. Another type of allogeneic transplant involves the islets of Langerhans, which contain the insulin-producing cells of the body. This type of tissue can be transplanted from cadavers to patients with diabetes mellitus, but recipients require immunosuppression therapy to survive.

Cell transplant experiments with paralyzed mice, pigs, and nonhuman primates demonstrated that Schwann cells (the myelin-producing cells that insulate nerve axons) injected into acutely injured spinal cord tissue could restore about 70 percent of the tissues functional capacity, thereby partially reversing paralysis.

embryonic stem cell: scientists conducting research on embryonic stem cellsMauricio LimaAFP/Getty ImagesStudies on experimental animals are aimed at understanding ways in which autogeneic or allogeneic adult stem cells can be used to regenerate damaged cardiovascular, neural, and musculoskeletal tissues in humans. Among adult stem cells that have shown promise in this area are satellite cells, which occur in skeletal muscle fibres in animals and humans. When injected into mice affected by dystrophy, a condition characterized by the progressive degeneration of muscle tissue, satellite cells stimulate the regeneration of normal muscle fibres. Ulcerative colitis in mice was treated successfully with intestinal organoids (organlike tissues) derived from adult stem cells of the large intestine. When introduced into the colon, the organoids attached to damaged tissue and generated a normal-appearing intestinal lining.

In many cases, however, adult stem cells such as satellite cells have not been easily harvested from their native tissues, and they have been difficult to culture in the laboratory. In contrast, embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can be harvested once and cultured indefinitely. Moreover, ESCs are pluripotent, meaning that they can be directed to differentiate into any cell type, which makes them an ideal cell source for regenerative medicine.

Studies of animal ESC derivatives have demonstrated that these cells are capable of regenerating tissues of the central nervous system, heart, skeletal muscle, and pancreas. Derivatives of human ESCs used in animal models have produced similar results. For example, cardiac stem cells from heart-failure patients were engineered to express a protein (Pim-1) that promotes cell survival and proliferation. When these cells were injected into mice that had experienced myocardial infarction (heart attack), the cells were found to enhance the repair of injured heart muscle tissue. Likewise, heart muscle cells (cardiomyocytes) derived from human ESCs improved the function of injured heart muscle tissue in guinea pigs.

Derivatives of human ESCs are likely to produce similar results in humans, although these cells have not been used clinically and could be subject to immune rejection by recipients. The question of immune rejection was bypassed by the discovery in 2007 that adult somatic cells (e.g., skin and liver cells) can be converted to ESCs. This is accomplished by transfecting (infecting) the adult cells with viral vectors carrying genes that encode transcription factor proteins capable of reprogramming the adult cells into pluripotent stem cells. Examples of these factors include Oct-4 (octamer 4), Sox-2 (sex-determining region Y box 2), Klf-4 (Kruppel-like factor 4), and Nanog. Reprogrammed adult cells, known as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, are potential autogeneic sources for cell transplantation and bioartificial tissue construction. Such cells have since been created from the skin cells of patients suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Alzheimer disease and have been used as human models for the exploration of disease mechanisms and the screening of potential new drugs. In one such model, neurons derived from human iPS cells were shown to promote recovery of stroke-damaged brain tissue in mice and rats, and, in another, cardiomyocytes derived from human iPS cells successfully integrated into damaged heart tissue following their injection into rat hearts. These successes indicated that iPS cells could serve as a cell source for tissue regeneration or bioartificial tissue construction.

Scaffolds and soluble factors, such as proteins and small molecules, have been used to induce tissue repair by undamaged cells at the site of injury. These agents protect resident fibroblasts and adult stem cells and stimulate the migration of these cells into damaged areas, where they proliferate to form new tissue. The ECMs of pig small intestine submucosa, pig and human dermis, and different types of biomimetic scaffolds are used clinically for the repair of hernias, fistulas (abnormal ducts or passageways between organs), and burns.

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Market Access Strategies for Advanced Therapies – Video

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Apr 142015
 



Market Access Strategies for Advanced Therapies
Moderator: Jason Kolbert, Senior Managing Director, Maxim Group Speakers: Brian Abraham, Senior Director, Market Access Reimbursement, NUO Therapeutics John Doyle, Dr.P.H., SVP …

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Regenerative Medicine Symposium set for April 24 at GRU

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Apr 142015
 

AUGUSTA, Ga. – Scientists and physicians from the region interested in regenerative and reparative medicine techniques, such as helping aging stem cells stay focused on making strong bone, will meet in Augusta April 24 to hear updates from leaders in the field and strategize on how to move more research advances to patients.

The daylong Regenerative Medicine and Cellular Therapy Research Symposium, sponsored by the Georgia Regents University Institute for Regenerative and Reparative Medicine, begins at 8 a.m. in Room EC 1210 of the GRU Health Sciences Building.

“We think this is a terrific opportunity for basic scientists and physicians to come together and pursue more opportunities to work together to get better prevention and treatment strategies to patients,” said Dr. William D. Hill, stem cell researcher and symposium organizer.

Dr. Arnold I. Caplan, Director of the Skeletal Research Center at Case Western Reserve University and a pioneer in understanding mesenchymal stem cells, which give rise to bone, cartilage, muscle, and more, will give the keynote address at 8:45 a.m. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy is under study for a variety of conditions including multiple sclerosis, osteoarthritis, diabetes, emphysema, and stroke.

Other keynotes include:

The GRU Institute for Regenerative and Reparative Medicine has a focus on evidence-based approaches to healthy aging with an orthopaedic emphasis. “As you age, the bone is more fragile and likely to fracture,” Hill said. “We want to protect bone integrity before you get a fracture as well as your bone’s ability to constantly repair so, if you do get a fracture, you will repair it better yourself.”

Bone health is a massive and growing problem with the aging population worldwide. “What people don’t need is to fall and wind up in a nursing home,” said Dr. Mark Hamrick, MCG bone biologist and Research Director of the GRU institute. “This is a societal problem, a clinical problem, and a potential money problem that is going to burden the health care system if we don’t find better ways to intervene.”

The researchers are exploring options such as scaffolding to support improved bone repair with age as well as nutrients that impact ongoing mesenchymal stem cell health, since these stem cells, which tend to decrease in number and efficiency with age, are essential to maintaining strong bones as well as full, speedy recovery.

Dr. Carlos Isales, endocrinologist and Clinical Director of the GRU institute, is looking at certain nutrients, particularly amino acids, and how some of their metabolites produce bone damage while others prevent or repair it. Isales is Principal Investigator on a major Program Project grant from the National Institutes of Health exploring a variety of ways to keep aging mesenchymal stem cells healthy and focused on making bone. “I think the drugs we have reduce fractures, but I think there are better ways of doing that,” Isales said. “We are always thinking translationally,” said Hill.

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Download Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine in Ophthalmology PDF – Video

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Apr 132015
 



Download Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine in Ophthalmology PDF
You can download this book in PDF version for FREE at http://bit.ly/1EDpo1A.

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Nadia Rosenthal: Stanford Childx Conference – Video

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Apr 122015
 



Nadia Rosenthal: Stanford Childx Conference
Nadia Rosenthal discusses regenerative medicine at the inaugural Childx Conference, 2015. Childx is a dynamic, TED-style conference designed to inspire innovation that improves pediatric and…

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U.S. Stem Cell Clinic: Meet Kristin Comella – Video

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Apr 122015
 



U.S. Stem Cell Clinic: Meet Kristin Comella
Ms. Comella has over 15 years experience in corporate entities with expertise in regenerative medicine, training and education, research, product development, and senior management. Ms. Comella…

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Histogenics – Video

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Apr 112015
 



Histogenics
Elissa Cote, VP, Marketing External Relations (NASDAQ: HSGX) Headquarters: Waltham, MA Histogenics is a regenerative medicine company focused on developing and commercializing products …

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Histogenics – Video

Capricor Therapeutics – Video

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Apr 112015
 



Capricor Therapeutics
Linda Marban, Ph.D., CEO (NASDAQ: CAPR) Headquarters: Los Angeles, CA Capricor Therapeutics is a clinical stage biotechnology company focused on the treatment of fibrotic and inflammatory…

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Asterias Biotherapeutics – Video

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Apr 112015
 



Asterias Biotherapeutics
Pedro Lichtinger, President CEO (NYSEMKT: AST) Headquarters: Menlo Park, CA Asterias develops products based on its core technology platforms of pluripotent stem cells and allogeneic dendritic.

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AGTC – Video

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Apr 112015
 



AGTC
Susan Washer, President CEO (NASDAQ: AGTC) Headquarters: Gainesville, FL AGTC is developing cures for rare eye diseases, offering hope to patients with unmet medical needs. With a highly…

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Cellular Biomedicine Group – Video

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Apr 112015
 



Cellular Biomedicine Group
William Cao, Ph.D., CEO (NASDAQ: CBMG) Headquarters: Palo Alto, CA Cellular Biomedicine Group is a U.S./China biomedicine company that develops cell therapies for certain cancerous diseases…

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Cellular Biomedicine Group – Video

ViaCyte – Video

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Apr 112015
 



ViaCyte
Paul Laikind, Ph.D., President CEO (Private) Headquarters: San Diego, CA ViaCyte's clinical development stage diabetes therapy, (VC-01), combines a highly engineered cell product (PEC-01…

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Voyager Therapeutics – Video

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Apr 112015
 



Voyager Therapeutics
Steve Paul, M.D., CEO (Private) Headquarters: Cambridge, MA Voyager Therapeutics is developing life-changing gene therapies for fatal and debilitating diseases of the central nervous system….

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Voyager Therapeutics – Video

Audentes Therapeutics – Video

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Apr 112015
 



Audentes Therapeutics
Dawn Blessing, VP, Corporate Development (Private) Headquarters: San Francisco, CA Audentes is a biotechnology company committed to the development and commercialization of innovative new…

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NexImmune – Video

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Apr 112015
 



NexImmune
Ken Carter, Ph.D., CEO (Private) Headquarters: Gaithersburg, MA NexImmune, Inc. holds an exclusive worldwide license to the Artificial IMmune (AIM) technology from Johns Hopkins University….

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Bone Therapeutics – Video

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Apr 112015
 



Bone Therapeutics
Wim Goemaere, CFO (Euronext: BOTHE) Headquarters: Gosselies, Belgium Bone Therapeutics is a leading biotechnology company headquartered at the Biople of Gosselies (South of Brussels, …

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ReNeuron – Video

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Apr 112015
 



ReNeuron
Olav Hellebo, CEO (RENE.L) Headquarters: Guildford, Surrey, U.K. ReNeuron is a leading, clinical-stage cell therapy development business. Based in the U.K., its primary objective is the developmen…

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ReNeuron – Video




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