Cyborg | Designer-Babies | Futurism | Futurist | Immortality | Longevity | Nanotechnology | Post-Human | Singularity | Transhuman


Page 11234..1020..»

Pass Christian, Mississippi – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 Beaches  Comments Off on Pass Christian, Mississippi – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Apr 292016
 

Pre-historyEdit

The exact date when Native Americans first arrived in the Gulf Coast area is not known, but artifacts have been found suggesting that humans have inhabited the area for many thousands of years.

Indian mounds can be found throughout the Gulf coast region of southern Mississippi, but many have been destroyed by artifact hunters, farmers, developers, and flooding. A 1768 English map shows one large mound existed on the shore near to Market Street. Others existed at Bayou Portage and the Shelly Plantation on the shore north of the Bay of St. Louis near DeLisle. The mounds and middens in the area containing arrowheads, pottery, and human skeletons were pilfered by amateur archaeologists over the years and many of the items recovered are in private collections. At the border of Pass Christian and Long Beach near White Harbor Road meets Hwy. 90 there once existed an Indian village, whose inhabitants were referred to by locals as “The Pitcher Point Indians”. The approximate location of the Indian Village is just a few hundred yards east of White Harbor Road. There are no ruins at this location but the beach in this area has produced many arrowheads and pottery shards over the years.

It is likely that Pitcher Point is the location where survivors of the 1528 lvar Nez Cabeza de Vaca Narvez expedition landed naked and starving among a people called the Carnones. This story was told to DeVaca by friendly Indians who stated that, the natives had killed the Spanish who were so feeble that they could not defend themselves.

Pass Christian was discovered by French-Canadian explorers in 1699, shortly after the first French colony was established in Biloxi. In June of 1699, while sounding the channel at the Pass Christian peninsula, the French named that channel Passe aux Hutres for the many oysters they found there. Pass Christian was named for a nearby deepwater pass, which in turn was named for Nicholas Christian L’Adnier, who lived on nearby Cat Island beginning in 1746.[2]

They remained on Ile aux Vaisseaux the following day due to bad weather. On the 13th Iberville and his brother Bienville with a party of thirteen men went ashore, sailing due north from the west end of the island. Their landing would have been somewhere between present-day Beauvoir and Edgewater.

The following morning they explored eastward along the beach, following footprints in the sand until they caught sight of three Indians in a canoe leaving Deer Island. Iberville pursued them across Biloxi Bay, catching up just as they reached shore at Ocean Springs. The younger natives fled into the woods leaving an old and dying man. The Frenchmen made him a bed of straw and built him a fire before withdrawing to make a camp for themselves. Unfortunately, the grasses around him soon caught fire and though the fires were extinguished, the old man died half an hour later.

Ibervilles hunters captured an old woman in the woods and heaped gifts upon her to take to her people. The first diplomatic contact with the native people had been accomplished and the Indians told them of the great river to the west.

On February 27 Iberville set out in wind and drizzle with Bienville, M. Sauvolle and about 48 men to visit the Mississippi River. They spent the night near the south end of the later named Bay of Saint Louis and the following day traversed the Breton Sound in fog and rain which continued through the following day. On March 2, running before a storm, they located and entered the mouth of the Mississippi and traveled up stream making contact with various tribes until on March 16 they came upon a decorated pole which marked the boundary between the Houmas and the Bayagoulas tribes. They called the place Red Stick or Baton Rouge. On the return trip, Iberville discovered the proof he sought in the form of letter written by Henri de Tonti to La Salle fourteen years earlier. The letter had been left with the chief of the Mongoulachas who bartered it to Iberville for a few hatchets and knives.

Iberville shortly thereafter divided his party into two groups. Bienville returned by the mouth of the Mississippi while Iberville explored the area of Pass Manschac, lakes Maurepas and Pontchartrain and returned to the open water by the Rigolets.

When Iberville departed from his ships on April 27, he instructed them to return to France if he had not returned within one month. On March 30 he camped near the mouth of the Bay of Saint Louis where he built a large fire to signal his return.

The following morning he recognized Cat island, and shortly thereafter reached his ships. About an hour later Bienville and his party arrived.

In 1781 all of Pass Christian peninsula was owned by Julia de la Brosse (Widow Asmard). Upon her death in 1799, Widow Asmard deeded 800 arpents the entire downtown Pass Christian to Charles Asmar, a free person of color,[3] who upon his death left the property to his heirs. Pass Christian was officially chartered as a town in 1848.[4]

On the night of December 12, 1814, more than 1000 British troops and 42 barges en route to New Orleans moved through the pass between Ship and Cat Islands and sailed westward along the Mississippi coast, passing just offshore of Pass Christian. They were closely watched by Lt. Thomas ap Catesby Jones, commanding the seven American boats standing off Malheureux Island as the British proceeded to anchor off Hendersons Point (western tip of Pass Christian) the night of the 13th of December. He dispatched the tender, Sea Horse, under the command of Sailing Master William Johnson into the Bay of Saint Louis to assist in the removal of the public stores lest they fall to the British. He then sent the ship, Alligator to Chalmette to warn General Andrew Jackson of the British approach.

Word of the British fleets arrival spread throughout the county and a large crowd gathered at sunrise on the 14th, along the bluff to watch the fleet passing. Three British boats were dispatched to capture the Sea Horse as it endeavored to load munitions below the bluff at Ulman Avenue. Among the crowd was an elderly lady on crutches, a Miss Claiborne, who was visiting from Natchez. About 2 p.m., on observing the impending attack, she is quoted as saying Will no one fire a shot in defense of our country whereupon it is said that she took Mayor Toulmes cigar and lighted one of the cannon. The ball sailed past the Seahorse and landed close to the approaching British. Assuming that he had fire cover from shore, Capt. Johnson seized the initiative and attacked the British fleet. He had a 6-pounder (canon) on his deck and after half an hour of intense barrage the British retreated. Four more barges joined the first three and the seven renewed the attack. Although Capt. Johnsons defense was gallant, superior numbers forced him to blow up the little schooner rather than surrender her.

The rest of the American fleet in the Mississippi Sound, consisting of four barges, was anchored in the westerly current between Malheureux Island and Point Clear. On the morning of the 15th, the British rowed their boats into the current until they were about two miles away where they anchored to take tea (breakfast) and rest before attacking. About 10:30 they closed on the brave little fleet under the command of Lt. Thomas ap Catesby Jones.

By 12:40 the battle was over. Six Americans were dead and 35 were wounded. The British suffered 17 dead and 77 wounded. The greater significance of this battle and the greater loss to the British was the passage of time allowing General Andrew Jackson to gather more troops and to complete fortifications for the defense at Chalmette where victory over the British was achieved on January 7.

The British were so certain of victory that they brought civil servants to assume governing the areas they expected to conquer with them, as well as wives and children who were waiting on the Mississippi Coast islands. However, the great victory for the Americans was rendered inconsequential because the peace treaty had already been signed and word had not reached the Coast.

Mississippi became a state in December, 1817 and the first act of the Mississippi legislature was to incorporate the city of Bay Saint Louis (directly across the bay from Pass Christian) to become the capital of the state. The incorporation was completed at the morning session but at the afternoon session, the representative from Rankin County changed his vote and Natchez was designated capital instead. It remained the capital for two years before the capital was moved to Jackson where it remains.

The town was a famous resort prior to the American Civil War. It was a favorite location for the beach and summer homes of the wealthy of New Orleans, who built a row of historic mansions along the shoreline, where Scenic Drive was one of the country’s notable historic districts.[citation needed] The Southern Yacht Club, established in 1849, was the first yacht club in the South and the second in the United States, and was originally located in Pass Christian before moving to New Orleans in 1857.[5] The Pass Christian Yacht Club was itself founded in the mid 20th century.

During the Civil War, the Battle of Pass Christian occurred when the USSMassachusetts(1860) began shelling the town. The 3rd Mississippi Regiment, which was stationed in Pass Christian, had marched toward Biloxi expecting a Union landing there, leaving Pass Christian completely unprotected. A housewife dashed to her upper floor balcony and waved a white bed sheet, the flag of surrender, and the bombardment ceased. Union soldiers plundered the town before withdrawing, there being little of value, including food, for them to confiscate. This skirmish became known as the Bedsheet Surrender.

On September 4, 1861, 69 men, including Captain Ashbel Green were mustered into military service. They made up the Dahlgren Guards Company, which was part of the Third Mississippi Infantry “C” Regiment, commanded by Col. John Deason. The Pass Christian Dahlgren Guards was headed by Lt. Col. Thomas A. Mellon during their encampment at Camp Tugville, which was located two miles northeast of the Pass near the intersection of White Rock Road and Pass Road.

In the early months of 1862, the women of the Pass raised their spirits by creating a flag that represented their love for their men, devotion for their sovereign state, and dedication to the war effort. The flag they created, The Pass Christian Flag, was an adaptation of the official flag of the Sovereign Republic of Mississippi.[6]

Pass Christian was in the path of two of the most intense hurricanes ever to hit the United States–Hurricane Camille on August 17, 1969, and Hurricane Katrina on August 29, 2005. Each hurricane caused the near total destruction of the city. Hurricane Camille, the 2nd strongest hurricane of the 20th century, was declared a hurricane (meaning it had sustained wind speeds of 74 m.p.h.) on Friday, August 15, 1969. By the time it smashed into the Mississippi Gulf Coast at Pass Christian, Mississippi 2 days later on Sunday, August 17, it had sustained winds of 190 m.p.h. with gusts in the 210 220 m.p.h. range. It also had the 2nd lowest barometric pressure ever recorded [909 millibars (26.85)]. Raindrops hit with the force of bullets, and waves off the Gulf Coast crested between twenty-two and twenty-eight feet above normal tide range. Camille was only the 2nd hurricane on record to reach Category 5 at the time of landfall, as well as being the 2nd most intense hurricane at the time of landfall. The 1935 Labor Day hurricane was the first Category 5 hurricane as well as the strongest and most intense hurricane ever to make landfall in the United States in recorded history.[7][8]

Hurricane Camille destroyed the Richelieu Apartments killing eight people who had chosen to ride the storm out. The Richelieu Apartments faced the Gulf of Mexico and was less than 250 feet away from the surf on the beach. Early Sunday, August 17, the storm was southeast of New Orleans by 200 miles. A Hurricane Warning was then announced for the entire Mississippi Coast. Evacuation was advised but some of the occupants of the Richelieu apartments ignored the warning. At 10:15p.m. on August 17, 1969 the front wall of the storm came ashore. The Richelieu Apartments were totally destroyed; all that remained were the foundation and the shell of the in-ground swimming pool, the force of the water pounded the concrete block construction until it completely destroyed the building. The hurricane party depicted in “Hurricane”, a 74 min TV Movie featuring some notable stars includes actual footage of hurricane “Camille”.

On August 29, 2005, Pass Christian was almost completely destroyed by Hurricane Katrina. Of the approximately 8,000 homes in Pass Christian, all but 500 were damaged or destroyed. In spite of the fact that the beachfront Scenic Drive follows the crest of a small bluff, affording it some elevation, most of the historic mansions along the road were severely damaged, and many were completely destroyed, including the superbly restored Greek Revival mansion “Union Quarters” described in the National Register of Historic Places as having been built in 1855. A cast iron fence fronted the property enclosing a Magnolia Historical Marker which was dedicated in 1960. It read, “Union officers were temporarily quartered here during the invasion of Pass Christian.”

Hurricane Katrina totally destroyed the local public library. It was rebuilt.[9] Thirteen members of the city’s police department retreated to the library after the police station became unsafe and water from the Gulf of Mexico began to pour in.

The library was immediately north of City Hall across a small parking lot but was at a lower elevation. When the water crested the elevation of City Hall, the police cars in the parking lot began to float and were carried around the parking lot by the current. One car struck the south side doors, causing them to implode, and the Gulf of Mexico driven by Katrina’s powerful winds rushed into the building. With no way to fight against the current they were trapped inside a concrete box that was rapidly filling with water. Knowing that they had to escape they attempted to shoot the glass out of the north side of the building. This was unsuccessful, as the bullets ricocheted off the glass. The laminated glass proved impervious to the .45 caliber rounds of the police-issue handguns. The force of the water entering the building after the southern wall was destroyed by the car was far too strong to swim against. The only way out was with the current. Police Chief John Dubbisson swam to the rear doors that had to be opened where he successfully touched the push bar. He then grabbed a railing before the storm surge could carry him off. All that were inside the library made it outside and rode out the rest of the storm on the roof.[10][11]

The storm surge from Hurricane Katrina that hit Pass Christian was estimated at 8.5m (27.8ft),[12] which is the US record high,[13] leveling Pass Christian up to half a mile inland from the shore; estimation of highest storm surges was complicated because high-water markers were also destroyed. Highway 90 along the beach was damaged, and the bridge over the Bay of St. Louis was thrown completely apart, not being reopened until a new bridge was partially completed in May 2007. (Connection was temporarily replaced by a ferry service.) Sewage contamination rendered the local water supply unusable, as some samples tested positive for more than 250 bacteria and parasites. By late September 2005, access was restricted south of the railroad tracks (about four blocks inland) without proper credentials, as crews continued to search for victims and clear debris. In early 2007, although rebuilding was underway in much of the city, a large portion of empty, deserted homes and other structures remain. Many residents were still living in FEMA trailers, and out-of-state volunteers were still needed for the rebuilding effort.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 15.3 square miles (40km2), of which 8.4 square miles (22km2) is land and 6.9 square miles (18km2) (44.97%) is water.

Geographically, the town of Pass Christian located on the Mississippi Sound, and is situated on a peninsula, with water on three sides: the Gulf of Mexico to the south, the Bay of St. Louis to the west and a long stretch of bayou to the north.

The unincorporated area north of the bayou, known as DeLisle (pronounced “duh LILL” or “duh LEEL”), shares a zip code with Pass Christian, but is not within the city limits. DeLisle was formerly known as Wolf Town or Wolftown.

The Municipal Harbor was formalized in 1956 with the creation of a Harbor Commission. In 1958, an 11-foot high, 350-foot long, concrete, breakwater wall was constructed in the sound by the T.L. James Company. There are only two such concrete harbor walls in the world, with the other in Japan. Almost 1000 linear feet of public fishing is permitted on the two breakwalls. The harbor consists of seven piers, four assigned for pleasure craft and three for commercial vessels. Before it was destroyed by waves from Hurricane Katrina there were 346 slips ranging in berth sizes from 31-feet to 84-feet, in addition to a skiff-pier providing 20 tie-ups. Water, electricity, showers, restrooms, and a bait and fuel station and a vessel pump-out station were available, all overseen from the two-story Harbor Master office.[citation needed]

Pass Christian possessed some of the finest oyster reefs in the world, which have served to anchor Pass Christians economy. The oyster reefs that lie just offshore are among the largest on the Mississippi Gulf Coast. The Pass Christian group of Oyster Reefs have been documented on maps since D’Iberville and Bienville chartered these waters in 1699. Early French maps of the area refer to the reefs and batures as Passe aux Hutres (Oyster Pass). There are nine reefs comprising an area of about twenty square miles. Further west are the Henderson Point and Calico reefs which are one to two miles south of Henderson Point.

As of the census[16] of 2000, there were 6,579 people, 2,687 households, and 1,797 families residing in the city. The population density was 781.2 people per square mile (301.7/km). There were 3,351 housing units at an average density of 397.9 per square mile (153.7/km). The racial makeup of the city was 65.91% White, 28.17% African American, 0.62% Native American, 3.48% Asian (almost all Vietnamese American), 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.62% from other races, and 1.17% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.75% of the population.

There were 2,687 households out of which 27.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.6% were married couples living together, 16.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.1% were non-families. 27.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 2.88.

In the city the population was spread out with 23.4% under the age of 18, 6.9% from 18 to 24, 25.3% from 25 to 44, 25.2% from 45 to 64, and 19.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 86.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.6 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $40,743, and the median income for a family was $46,232. Males had a median income of $35,352 versus $22,195 for females. The per capita income for the city was $26,008. About 8.2% of families and 10.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.0% of those under age 18 and 6.2% of those age 65 or over.

The Du Pont White Pigment and Mineral Products Plant now known as the Chemours DeLisle Plant is located just south of I-10 in DeLisle. The plant is one of the world’s largest producers of titanium dioxide and has been in operation since 1979. The town of Pass Christian is near the plant, directly across the Bay of St. Louis. Some community members also expressed concerns that chemical releases, as reported on EPAs Toxic Release Inventory, from the DuPont plant could have contaminated the communitys water and air. DuPont DeLisle’s titanium dioxide plant reported the third highest amount of dioxin-like compounds in EPAs Toxic Release Inventory (TRI). In 2005, the Hurricane Katrina storm surge flooded significant portions of the plant. Unlike other aquatic organisms, blue crabs do not have the ability to metabolize quickly certain dioxin-like compounds Polychlorinated dibenzofurans that predominate in the coke and ore solids waste stream of the plant.

The Pass Packing Company was formed on May 16, 1899, with George Brandt, F Andressen, Frank Sutter, TV Courtenay, JH Knost, and George H Taylor as its founding officers. This plant was bought out by the Dunbar and Dukate interests of Biloxi who also acquired the cannery at Bay St. Louis. The plant was located at the present site of the Pass Christian Yacht Club. Originally built in 1902, the building was destroyed by the 1947 hurricane. Workers arrived by truck or box car and were housed in special cottages owned by the factory. There was a large apartment building on Market Avenue which the locals called the “White Elephant”, and was reported to house as many as 30 families. Additionally, there were the Row Houses consisting of rows of duplexes built one after the other.The “Green Row” on Dunbar Street had 16 duplexes, and the “Red Row” on Woodman Avenue had 19 duplexes.These houses were eventually abandoned when in 1956 mechanical oyster shuckers were installed, thereby eliminating the need for so many employees.

Besides seafood packer George Washington Dunbar, there was Ernest Hudson Merrick, who was one of the first importers of out of state labor for the seafood packing industry at Pass Christian. In 1908, he started visiting the Pass during summers to escape the heat of New Orleans. During his summers he became interested in the potential of fishing along the coast and proceeded to build a fleet of fishing schooners and a factory for processing, packing, and shipping oysters and shrimp,said one of his sons, Bill Merrick. He was one of the first to ship fresh oysters and shrimp to the north packed in ice. The delicacy of the Gulf Coast oysters created a large demand in the Midwest.

Seafood production in the region has been severely impacted by large scale fish die-offs. The The Deepwater Horizon oil spill, which occurred in the spring and summer of 2010along with the presence of toxic sediments stirred up by Hurricane Katrina and record amounts of fresh water diverted into the Bonnet Carre Spillway in Louisianahave brought seafood production to a standstill. Offshore oyster beds were hit especially hard. Field crews have reported a 50 percent to 65 percent mortality rate in some areas. An even greater mortality rate of 90 percent to 95 percent has been seen in other oyster beds.

The owner of a Mississippi seafood company filed a federal class-action lawsuit Friday over the rig explosion that caused a massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. On April 30, 2010 A local Seafood shipper, Jerry Forte, owner of Jerry Forte Seafood in Pass Christian, claims the spill could damage the commercial seafood industry. Forte’s attorneys filed the suit in U.S. District Court in Gulfport. The suit seeks at least $5 million in compensatory damages, plus an unspecified amount of punitive damages against Transocean, BP, Halliburton Energy Services Inc. and Cameron International Corp. and Hyundai Heavy Industries Co.

Between 1923 and 1929 New Orleans residents Rudolf Hecht and Lynne Watkins Hecht developed Middlegate Japanese Gardens at their summer home in Pass Christian, Mississippi.[17] The Hechts built Middlegate Japanese gardens to perpetuate their pleasant memories of their travels in Japan. The gardens are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Since 1923 when the Hechts established them, Middlegate Japanese Gardens have been private, residential gardens.[18] The gardens were extensively damaged by Hurricane Katrina in 2005. The Smithsonian Institution has included the gardens on their Collection Search Center website.[19]

James M. Sherman, at age 67, began construction of Sherman Castle. Designed and built of solid cement, the steel-reinforced castle located at 1012 West Beach, Highway 90 has withstood many hurricanes. At the time of his death, Sherman had completed most of the structure with walls that are nine inches thick. Much of the structure was first laid out in molds that were shaped and poured with concrete to erect the castle piece by piece. The theme of the Castle, “God is my Sculptor” is located on a plaque within the castle.[20]

Pass Christian’s government is a mayorcouncil government system. The current mayor, Leo “Chipper” McDermott, was elected in a special election in 2006, following the resignation of the previous mayor, and then re-elected for a full term in 2009.

Current Board of Aldermen

Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport, Mississippi, launched Seabees on Sept. 9 to neighboring communities throughout Harrison and Stone counties, including Pass Christian, to assist its citizens with disaster recovery in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. In a measure to improve health, sanitation and morale, the Seabees cleared approximately three miles of railroad track for a temporary sewer line, they set up a laundry unit and installed a nine-head shower unit for the firefighters and volunteers. They also built temporary housing to house 1,000 people rendered homeless by the impact of Hurricane Katrina. 250 Seabees from detachments across the United States gathered behind the city’s War Memorial Park, where they constructed a temporary police department headquarters and other municipal offices. This was not the first time that Seabees have answered the call to duty in Pass Christian. The naval construction teams performed a similar feat after Hurricane Camille struck the town hard in 1969.

The Pass Christian School District operates the schools in the city, and in the inland, unincorporated areas around and to the north of DeLisle. The Pass Christian Middle School (formerly the Pass Christian High School) on the corner of 2nd Street and Church Street was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina. A monument proclaiming that the school had withstood Hurricane Camille was left standing. The new Pass Christian High School, which opened in 2001, was flooded almost to the second level, but was renovated and re-opened in October 2006. The Pass Christian Elementary School, across the street from the high school, was also flooded and was torn down because of mold concerns. Delisle Elementary was the only school left standing, and became a temporary grounds for all of the students of the Pass Christian School District, housed either in temporary trailer classrooms or in the elementary school, sharing cafeteria and gymnasium facilities with the school.

A new educational complex housing Pass Christian Middle School and Pass Christian Elementary School is the $32 million Pass Christian Center of Excellence. It includes a day care center and an attached Boys & Girls Club,[21] on the north side of campus. It opened in 2010. As of 2011, Delisle Elementary School has been torn down and is under reconstruction.[citation needed]

Pass Christian High School is a Blue Ribbon school.[22]

The parochial elementary and middle school of St. Paul’s Roman Catholic church was destroyed by Katrina, and the school was merged with the neighboring Long Beach parochial school to form St. Vincent de Paul School. Coast Episcopal High School is a parochial high school in Pass Christian.

Read the original:
Pass Christian, Mississippi – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 Posted by at 10:42 am  Tagged with:

Beaches in Northwest Indiana | Indiana Dunes

 Beaches  Comments Off on Beaches in Northwest Indiana | Indiana Dunes
Apr 282016
 

The stress of everyday life melts away the instant you arrive at any of the beaches within the Indiana Dunes. Whether youre relaxing on the beach as gentle waves lap the shore around you, strolling along the shore, or playing frisbee, its apparent why this natural wonder is called Natures Masterpiece.

Parents magazine picked the Indiana Dunes shoreline among the top five family beaches in the nation along with beaches in San Diego, California and Maui, Hawaii. TripAdvisor.com ranked the Indiana Dunes in its top six.

So whether you enjoy splashing in Lake Michigan, playing beach volleyball, building sand castles or just spending hours lying in the sun, the beaches at the Indiana Dunes are the place to spend a perfect summer day.

Below are the beach access points where youll find access to our 15 miles of sandy shoreline. Sites are denoted as handicap accessible if a wheelchair can get all the way to the beach or to a recreation area with a lake view.

Go here to read the rest:
Beaches in Northwest Indiana | Indiana Dunes

 Posted by at 4:41 pm  Tagged with:

Beaches Near Indiana | USA Today

 Beaches  Comments Off on Beaches Near Indiana | USA Today
Apr 282016
 

Skip to main content.

Meg Jernigan, Demand Media

Indiana’s short northern border along Lake Michigan offers sandy beaches, dunes and marshlands. In addition, a number of lakes in the state have public and private beaches that provide a variety of water activities, including boating and fishing, and, of course, swimming and sunbathing.

Patoka Lake (in.gov) stretches into the Hoosier National Forest in southern Indiana. Part of a 25,800-acre collection of state recreational areas, the 8,000-acre lake is a destination for campers, boaters and anglers. Park interpreters lead programs on kayaking and the natural history of the area, which provides habitat for bald eagles and osprey. The park has an archery range, 10 boat ramps and a disc golf course. Marinas rent houseboats and sell marine supplies and fuel. Patoka Lake’s swimming beach has a bathhouse with restrooms, showers and a food concession.

Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore (nps.gov) offers steep dunes, marshes, woodlands and 15 miles of beach on Lake Michigan. Hiking trails in the park connect the historic areas, parallel a bird sanctuary and wind over dunes and through bogs. A path leads to the top of Mount Baldy, a 126-foot tall dune. The park’s Artist-in-Residence program invites artists to live at the park and share their work. Only one of the seven designated beaches at the park, West Beach, has lifeguards and showers, and that beach charges a fee. All of the beaches have parking lots and restrooms.

Pokagan State Park (in.gov) in the northeast corner of Indiana, borders Lake James and Snow Lake. Stone and wood buildings constructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps dot the rolling hills and wetlands of the park. Hiking trails ranging in length from just under a mile to over two-miles long wind through the countryside, and park rangers lead interpretive programs. Pokagan State Park offers accommodations at a campground, in cabins and at the Potawatomi Inn. A swimming beach with a free bathhouse on Lake James opens the Saturday before Memorial Day and closes on Labor Day or earlier, depending on the weather.

The 10,750-acre Monroe Lake (in.gov) south of Bloomington has two unguarded seasonal beaches with modern bathhouses with showers, restrooms and food concession stands. Nine boat ramps provide access to the water for fishing and water skiing. Four easy-to-moderate hiking trails explore the forest ecosystems that surround the lake. Fourwinds Resort (fourwindsresort.com) in the Fairfax State Recreation Area offers rooms and suites overlooking the lake. The resort rents boats and has an indoor/outdoor pool for guests who don’t want to venture to the beach.

Lake O’The Woods Club (lowc.org) near Valparaiso is a member-owned, family-friendly nudist club with a 20-acre private lake. Non-members pay an additional fee for the use of the club’s amenities such as the beach, swimming pool and clubhouse. Lake O’The Woods has campsites and camping cabins and sponsors planned activities like pancake breakfasts most weekends. Indiana Beach (indianabeach.com) is an amusement complex on Lake Shafer near Monticello. The complex has more than 40 rides, including six roller coasters, restaurants and a swimming beach. Overnight guests can choose from cottages, standard rooms and a NASCAR RV park.

Meg Jernigan has been writing for more than 30 years. She specializes in travel, cooking and interior decorating. Her offline credits include copy editing full-length books and creating marketing copy for nonprofit organizations. Jernigan attended George Washington University, majoring in speech and drama.

Thank you for providing feedback to our Editorial staff on this article. Please fill in the following information so we can alert the Travel Tips editorial team about a factual or typographical error in this story. All Fields are required.

See the original post:
Beaches Near Indiana | USA Today

The eight beaches of the Indiana Dunes – NPS

 Beaches  Comments Off on The eight beaches of the Indiana Dunes – NPS
Apr 282016
 

The sandy Lake Michigan shoreline varies from dunes over 125 feet high to short marram grass topped dunes. Fifteen miles of national lakeshore shoreline may be accessed from parking lots that are open from 7:00 a.m. to 30 minutes past sunset. Bicyclists and hikers can enter at 6:00a.m. The 40 space waterside Lake View parking lot is the only one pulling night hours and it remains open until 11:00 p.m.

All beach parking is free of charge with the exception of a user fee at West Beach from Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day weekend in which a fee of $ 6.00 per vehicle or $30.00 per bus is accessed. The largest parking lot is West Beach and it rarely fills.

Decisions to enter Lake Michigan waters are at your discretion. Lifeguards are only offered at West Beach and the state park from 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Memorial Day through Labor Day weekends. Waves, rip currents, and water quality are always changing in this fifth largest lake in the world. Rip currents can be created when waves extend to the horizon. If caught in one, do not swim against the current, but to the side and parallel to shore until free. Even a swimmer of Olympic skill cannot successfully swim against a rip current’s force.

Every beach access parking lot has restrooms. Showers are available at West Beach. Gas grills are permitted at all picnic shelters.

Some things are not permitted including:

All parking lots are located adjacent to the beach with a few exceptions. The Mt. Baldy parking lot connects via a one-half mile mildly strenuous beach trail and the Cowles Bog parking lot to the beach requires a five mile round trip hike. The one mile Dune Ridge trail off the Kemil Road Access Point showcases a variety of dunes habitats, but does not directly connect with the beach. Visitors must use the walkway alongside Kemil Road for one quarter mile to arrive lakeside. Parking at the end of Central Avenue is only a block away from the beach where the tall dunes saddle up closely to the lake. The new Portage Lakefront and Riverwalk parking is also only block from the water’s edge with picnic tables overlooking the beach and Chicago skyline. Accessible parking lots include West Beach, Lakeview, and Dunbar.

Please stay on the marked trails to preserve the dunes and remember to bring your sunscreen and insect repellent. Enjoy your visit to your dunes!

See the original post here:
The eight beaches of the Indiana Dunes – NPS

Margarita Island beaches (Isla Margarita Playas): photos …

 Beaches  Comments Off on Margarita Island beaches (Isla Margarita Playas): photos …
Apr 232016
 

The beaches are pretty too. Most have white sand and palm trees and services for beach-goers. Yet you can find small or secluded beaches too. There is a beach for everyone’s liking!

We want to bring to you these Margaritan beaches as pictures so you can see them and read about them. We hope this can inspire you to come visit our island!

You can also experience other tropical beaches by finding affordable Caribbean vacation deals online.

Popularity: ***

Swimming: **

Services: ***

Popularity: ***

Swimming: *

Services: ***

Popularity: **

Swimming: **

Services: **

Popularity: **

Swimming: **

Services: ***

Popularity: ***

Swimming: *

Services: ***

Popularity: *

Swimming: **

Services: **

Popularity: *

Swimming: ***

Services: **

Popularity: *

Swimming: *

Services: none

Popularity: *

Swimming: **

Services: *

Popularity: *

Swimming: **

Services: *

Popularity: *

Swimming: *

Services: *

Popularity: *

Swimming: **

Services: (***)

Popularity: *

Swimming: ***

Services: *

Popularity: *

Swimming: ***

Services: *

View original post here:
Margarita Island beaches (Isla Margarita Playas): photos …

 Posted by at 4:41 pm  Tagged with:

All Beaches, Lakes & Boating Philadelphia visitphilly.com

 Beaches  Comments Off on All Beaches, Lakes & Boating Philadelphia visitphilly.com
Apr 202016
 

The largest collegiate regatta in the United States

May 13-14, 2016 The Aberdeen Dad Vail Regatta is a two-day race held on the Schuylkill River in beautiful Fairmount Park, one of the most famous and scenic rowing routes in the world.

Tubing, canoeing, rafting and kayaking on the Delaware

Tubing, canoeing, rafting and kayaking trips down the scenic Delaware River

A lakeside oasis amid suburban Bucks County

A lakeside oasis amid suburban Bucks County

Cruise by historic New Hope aboard a Mississippi-style riverboat

Cruise by historic New Hope aboard a Mississippi-style riverboat

A 165-mile trail connecting waterways, rails and trails along a historic railroad path

A 165-mile trail connecting waterways, rails and trails along a historic railroad path

Full, half-day and overnight fly fishing adventures on the Delaware River

Full, half-day and overnight fly fishing adventures on the Delaware River.

A leisurely float down the Delaware, with lunch along the way

A leisurely float down the Delaware, with lunch along the way

One of the worlds largest city park systems

With more than 9,200 acres of rolling hills, gentle trails, relaxing waterfront and shaded woodlands, Fairmount Park keeps a wealth of natural landscapes within easy reach of all city residents.

You can take a stroll, head out for an afternoon of softball, organized frisbee or pier-side fishing, or just settle in for a family picnic. There are miles of trails for horseback riding, off-road cycling and deep-woods hiking, yet there are also tours of historic mansions, Japanese tea ceremonies and outdoor concerts. Three environmental centers, as well as a wildlife refuge treatment center, help bring the natural world to life for adults as well as children.

Overnight equestrian camping amid wooded trails and gorgeous views

An exciting, two-day race that draws fans from around the world

October 29-30, 2016 Enjoy a great fall weekend in Fairmount Park and take in a picturesque fall regatta at the Head of the Schuylkill Regatta, one of the longest running head races in the country.

Pennsylvanias largest remaining freshwater tidal marsh

With 1000 acres, ten miles of trails and many native wildlife and plants, the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum protects the largest fresh water tidal marsh in Pennsylvania.

Whitewater rafting right here in the Delaware Valley

Whitewater rafting, with Class 3 and 4 rapids, right here in the Delaware Valley

Full or half-day guided fishing trips

Get the most out of your fishing trip with a little help from experienced guides. Whether its trout or bass, salt or freshwater, Mainstream Outfitters can help you find your fish with one of their guided fishing trips.

A tidal estuary along the banks of Neshaminy Creek more than 100 miles upriver from the Delaware Bay

A tidal estuary along the banks of Neshaminy Creek, more than 100 miles upriver from the Delaware Bay

The largest lake in Southeastern Pennsylvania, accompanied by a 5,283-acre park

Offering more than 1,450 acres and four public launching areas, Lake Nockamixon is a popular spot for boating of all kinds, including catamarans and windsurfers. Anglers also enjoy this warm, expansive water lake, which is stocked with a variety of species.

Making waves

A premium hang on the northern edge of NoLibs, this swim club attracts an attractive crowd with tunes, drinks and chill space.

Kayaking, canoeing and tubing along the scenic Brandywine River

Northbrook Canoe Company offers kayaking, canoeing and tubing along the scenic Brandywine River in Chester County, Pennsylvania, about an hour southwest of Philadelphia.

Boat tours of the Schuylkill and Delaware Rivers

Offering excursions along the Delaware and Schuylkill Rivers, Patriot Harbor Lines welcomes up to 35 guests on its reproduction of a classic 1920s commuter yacht.

Lake Galena, at 365 acres, is a favorite recreational spot

Fourteen miles of trails are just one of the many outdoor activities that Peace Valley Park has to offer. Bring a picnic for a lakeside lunch, or paddle out onto Lake Galena and hook a bass, walleye, catfish, bluegill or carp. The bird blind at the Peace Valley Nature Center next door offers quiet observation of cardinals, woodpeckers, finches, titmice, sparrows and more.

One of the worlds elite racing teams

One of the worlds elite racing teams

10th anniversary of the weekend long triathlon festival

The Philadelphia Insurance Triathlon is a big deal in the multi-sport world, becoming a top-rated, sell-out event.

A colorful celebration of an ancient Chinese tradition

Stroll up Kelly Drive along the Schuylkill River for an unusually colorful and dramatic regatta, the Philadelphia Dragon Boat Festival, Philadelphias annual celebration of an ancient Chinese tradition.

A full day of rowing, food and fun on the banks of the Schuylkill River

Test yourself against a deep field of hundreds of other masters rowers at this annual rowing extravaganza, held on the famous Schuylkill River racecourse in Philadelphia.

Enter (or watch) as many races are you care to, but be prepared for a challenging 1,000-meter course, which starts at St. Joseph Universitys Boathouse and finishes by the storied Fairmount Park Grandstands.

Philadelphias only amphibious sightseeing tour

Take a ride on Philadelphias only amphibious sightseeing tour.

See the skyline from the Delaware River

A 12-minute scenic river tour gives you the opportunity to see sensational views of waterfront highlights and the City of Philadelphias spectacular skyline, all while floating down the impressive Delaware River.

A 26.5-mile, multi-use path from Philadelphia to Phoenixville

This 26.5-mile recreational path runs along the Schuylkill River from Center City Philadelphia to Phoenixville in Chester County.

235 acres for kayaking, bird walks, pond tours and seasonal festivals

Silver Lake Nature Center features a butterfly garden, lakes, marshes, meadows, a bog and 4.5 miles of nature trails that highlight the diverse plant and animal life in the area.

Cruise the Delaware River in style

For three decades, the Spirit of Philadelphia has provided a unique combination of dining, dancing, entertainment and incredible skyline views on the Delaware River.

Here is the original post:
All Beaches, Lakes & Boating Philadelphia visitphilly.com

 Posted by at 10:44 am  Tagged with:

Beaches, Lakes & Boating visitphilly.com – Visit Philadelphia

 Beaches  Comments Off on Beaches, Lakes & Boating visitphilly.com – Visit Philadelphia
Apr 202016
 

The largest lake in Southeastern Pennsylvania, accompanied by a 5,283-acre park

Offering more than 1,450 acres and four public launching areas, Lake Nockamixon is a popular spot for boating of all kinds, including catamarans and windsurfers. Anglers also enjoy this warm, expansive water lake, which is stocked with a variety of species.

The largest collegiate regatta in the United States

May 13-14, 2016 The Aberdeen Dad Vail Regatta is a two-day race held on the Schuylkill River in beautiful Fairmount Park, one of the most famous and scenic rowing routes in the world.

An exciting, two-day race that draws fans from around the world

October 29-30, 2016 Enjoy a great fall weekend in Fairmount Park and take in a picturesque fall regatta at the Head of the Schuylkill Regatta, one of the longest running head races in the country.

A colorful celebration of an ancient Chinese tradition

Stroll up Kelly Drive along the Schuylkill River for an unusually colorful and dramatic regatta, the Philadelphia Dragon Boat Festival, Philadelphias annual celebration of an ancient Chinese tradition.

235 acres for kayaking, bird walks, pond tours and seasonal festivals

Silver Lake Nature Center features a butterfly garden, lakes, marshes, meadows, a bog and 4.5 miles of nature trails that highlight the diverse plant and animal life in the area.

Boat tours of the Schuylkill and Delaware Rivers

Offering excursions along the Delaware and Schuylkill Rivers, Patriot Harbor Lines welcomes up to 35 guests on its reproduction of a classic 1920s commuter yacht.

Making waves

A premium hang on the northern edge of NoLibs, this swim club attracts an attractive crowd with tunes, drinks and chill space.

Full or half-day guided fishing trips

Get the most out of your fishing trip with a little help from experienced guides. Whether its trout or bass, salt or freshwater, Mainstream Outfitters can help you find your fish with one of their guided fishing trips.

Kayaking, canoeing and tubing along the scenic Brandywine River

Northbrook Canoe Company offers kayaking, canoeing and tubing along the scenic Brandywine River in Chester County, Pennsylvania, about an hour southwest of Philadelphia.

Whitewater rafting right here in the Delaware Valley

Whitewater rafting, with Class 3 and 4 rapids, right here in the Delaware Valley

Pennsylvanias largest remaining freshwater tidal marsh

With 1000 acres, ten miles of trails and many native wildlife and plants, the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum protects the largest fresh water tidal marsh in Pennsylvania.

Overnight equestrian camping amid wooded trails and gorgeous views

Lake Galena, at 365 acres, is a favorite recreational spot

Fourteen miles of trails are just one of the many outdoor activities that Peace Valley Park has to offer. Bring a picnic for a lakeside lunch, or paddle out onto Lake Galena and hook a bass, walleye, catfish, bluegill or carp. The bird blind at the Peace Valley Nature Center next door offers quiet observation of cardinals, woodpeckers, finches, titmice, sparrows and more.

A leisurely float down the Delaware, with lunch along the way

A leisurely float down the Delaware, with lunch along the way

Full, half-day and overnight fly fishing adventures on the Delaware River

Full, half-day and overnight fly fishing adventures on the Delaware River.

A 165-mile trail connecting waterways, rails and trails along a historic railroad path

A 165-mile trail connecting waterways, rails and trails along a historic railroad path

Read the original:
Beaches, Lakes & Boating visitphilly.com – Visit Philadelphia

Michigan Beaches – Best Beaches in Michigan

 Beaches  Comments Off on Michigan Beaches – Best Beaches in Michigan
Apr 192016
 

When you think of a beach vacation, you might start by looking at various beaches in Florida. But, you just might want to consider Michigan beaches for your next spot for fun in the sun. The Lake Michigan shoreline along western Michigan is often called the third coast. Consider that Michigan has more freshwater shoreline than any other state and you begin to understand why it is a good place to go for your next beach vacation. Numerous beach towns line the coast in Michigan, and their quality is found both in the scenery and bevy of attractions offered in an around them. Along the entire western coast of lower Michigan, you’ll find a number of hot spots for getting away from it all, and it is here that you’ll arguably find the best Michigan beaches. However, in a state almost surrounded entirely by water, who’s to say where the best beaches lay?

In the Upper Peninsula you’ll find Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore with its own beaches, however Lake Superior is the coldest of the Great Lakes, so the beaches found here probably don’t offer the best swimming possibilities. But throw on a wetsuit and you can enjoy kayaking, and the relative seclusion of the area makes it a welcome place to relax.

Among the most noted best Michigan beaches is Oval Beach in Saugatuck. Oval Beach was rated by Conde Nast as one of the top 25 beaches in the world, and National Geographic Traveler went on to name it one of the top two in the nation. That in and of itself should pique your interest in Lake Michigan beaches. Michigan Governor Granholm named Saugatuck among the 19 “coolest cities” in the state, and no doubt the city earns this distinction. In the area, there are top Michigan golf courses, its art community is renowned, and vacation rentals here vary from hotels and motels, to charming bed and breakfasts and vacation home rentals that will ensure your satisfaction. Its simply the perfect place for your next corporate event, family vacation, or romantic getaway.

Up the coast, the quality of Lake Michigan beaches continues. The naturally forming sand dunes have a lot to do with this. Sand dunes line most of the coast and form as the sweeping winds from the west move inland over the lake. They are stunning, and provide a picturesque backdrop to the beaches that has to be seen to be appreciated. Climbing them is a favorite activity for kids and adults the same, and the views are a reward for the work. At seaside retreats like Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore and Silver Lake, you’ll find camping and hiking to rival your best expectations. These parks are rich in scenery and you’ll want to check out Silver Lake Sand Dunes for the chance to take your 4×4 or dirt bike dune-riding, which is an experience you’ll be hard-pressed to find anywhere else. If you don’t have a 4×4 or dirt bike, you can take an organized dune-riding tour, an experience you won’t soon forget.

Towns like Muskegon, South Haven and Holland not only offer some of the best Michigan beaches, but also so much more. Summer festivals seem to always be going on and cultural attractions include historical sites and tours, great shopping and dining, kayak and jet-ski rentals, amusement parks and charming tours at some of the top Michigan wineries.

Michigan beaches are steadily getting the respect they deserve. A popular PBS series called Great Lakes Ports of Call is highlighting towns along the western coast of lower Michigan. These towns gain distinction in the “Michigan Beactowns” label and they are New Buffalo, St. Joseph, South Haven, Saugatuck-Douglas, Holland, Grand Haven, Muskegon, Silver Lake Sand Dunes, and Ludington. Lake Michigan beaches offer you and your family the next great spot for your summer vacation.

Although not as popular for its beaches, the Lake Huron shoreline of Michigan offers some nice retreats as well. Instead of the sunsets on the western side of the state, here you’ll be treated to some beautiful sunrises. Camping and kayaking along the Lake Huron shore is a great way to spend time away from the cares of the world. You also might be lucky enough to catch some Northern Lights depending on where you are.

Read more from the original source:
Michigan Beaches – Best Beaches in Michigan

 Posted by at 7:41 am  Tagged with:

Top Nude Beaches : Beaches : Travel Channel

 Beaches  Comments Off on Top Nude Beaches : Beaches : Travel Channel
Apr 182016
 

1. Little Beach

Thinkstock

Mr Boz, flickr

Just north of Miami lies one of the few county-run and government-sanctioned clothing-optional beaches in the United States. For years Haulover Beach has been a haven for naturists from South Florida as well as snowbirds from Canada and Europe. Thanks to the efforts of the South Florida Free Beach Association, this beach has certified lifeguards and organized group activities, such as swimming and volleyball.

Thinkstock

Andrew Herdy, Wikimedia Creative Commons

Johann Vanbeek, Wikimedia Creative Commons

Raguy, Wikimedia Creative Commons

MsNina, flickr

Named for a hulking, wrecked vessel that once sat on the sand, Wreck Beach was Canada’s first government-sanctioned, clothing-optional beach. The 3-mile-long beach is also a wildlife and nesting area for bald eagles. Still, some sections of the beach assume carnival-like atmosphere thanks to its proximity to the University of British Columbia and its popularity with students. One stretch of sand known as Vendors’ Row is a 1-stop shop for souvenirs, refreshments and ever-important sunscreen.

Tomash Devenishek, flickr

SORTIR, Wikimedia Creative Commons

xitraveler, flickr

Brian Fisk, flickr

More here:
Top Nude Beaches : Beaches : Travel Channel

Beaches in Mississippi | USA Today

 Beaches  Comments Off on Beaches in Mississippi | USA Today
Apr 122016
 

Skip to main content.

Serena Brown, Demand Media

Biloxi has man-made, white-sand beaches. (Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images News/Getty Images )

Known for its Southern charm and hospitality, Mississippi also offers great outdoor recreation on land and water. The state’s southern borders are situated on the Mississippi Sound and Gulf of Mexico, which means plenty of water and beaches for boating, fishing and swimming. In many communities, Highway 90 runs parallel to the coast and offers easy access to beaches. Other beaches are on state islands but also easy to get to by private or charter boat.

Ocean Springs, Long Beach, Bay St. Louis, Waveland and other coast cities have beaches overlooking the Mississippi Sound. The longest stretch of sand and surf is in Biloxi and Gulfport, which have 26 miles of man-made, white-sand beaches. Waves along the beaches are small and mild, blocked by a string of barrier islands 10 to 12 miles from shore. Horn, Cat, Petit Bois, East Ship and West Ship islands are part of the Gulf Islands National Seashore. They are bordered by the Mississippi Sound and Gulf of Mexico and have some amazing beaches and potentially big surf. Visitors can only get to the islands by boat, but seasonal ferry service is available to West Ship Island, the most popular of the chain. Dolphins are a common site around the barrier islands.

Waters of the Mississippi Sound are clean but brownish in color. This is because the waters are diluted by other water from the Pascagoula and Pearl rivers, which drain into the sound. Clear blue-green waters can be found in the Gulf of Mexico bordering the barrier islands located off the coast.

Of course, sunbathing and swimming are popular, but when visiting Mississippi beaches the to-do list might include getting in or on kayaks, Jet Skis, sailboats and hydrocycles. The islands are great for shelling, and both coast and island beaches are great for fishing. Part of the mainland beaches are reserved for endangered Least Tern birds. Although people aren’t allowed in these areas, they can get close enough for birdwatching and to take pictures. Because of its higher surf, the islands are great for surfing and boogie boarding.

South Mississippi can be extremely hot and humid, especially in summer, so sunburn, heat rash, heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke are real possibilities. Anyone going to beaches should consume plenty of water and use sunscreen. When not swimming, it is best to wear sunshades and clothes to protect your skin and consider spending time in shaded areas. Some places have vendors renting beach umbrellas. Life guards are on duty in summer on Ship Island, but most beaches are unguarded.

Serena Brown graduated from the University of South Alabama with a bachelor’s degree in communication. She has more than 15 years of experience in newspaper, radio and television reporting. Brown has also authored educational, medical and fitness material.

Thank you for providing feedback to our Editorial staff on this article. Please fill in the following information so we can alert the Travel Tips editorial team about a factual or typographical error in this story. All Fields are required.

Read more here:
Beaches in Mississippi | USA Today

 Posted by at 12:41 pm  Tagged with:

Beaches in Secaucus, New Jersey with Reviews & Ratings …

 Beaches  Comments Off on Beaches in Secaucus, New Jersey with Reviews & Ratings …
Apr 092016
 

1.Rain Be the first to reviewIs this your business?Claim it today

(212) 869-4270

1411 Broadway Rm 675New York, NY

(212) 254-2729

80 E 11th StNew York, NY

(718) 351-1745

88 Old Town RdStaten Island, NY

(718) 987-6729

210 New York AveStaten Island, NY

(212) 896-4600

89 South StreetNew York, NY

From Business:The Silver Gull Club offers a variety of facilities and activities for children and adults, including more than four swimming pools, water slides, minigolf, basketb

(718) 634-1500

1 Beach 193rd StBreezy Point, NY

(718) 338-3799

169 State RdBreezy Point, NY

Added to your travel collection!

Error when adding to travel collection

This business was removed from the travel collection

(718) 965-8900

1739 Boardwalk WBrooklyn, NY

(212) 219-0258

157 Rockaway Beach BoulevardRockaway Park, NY

(212) 219-0258

Edgemere Park RdFar Rockaway, NY

From Business:Popular beach for novice and experienced surfers. Point Lookout, NY / Lido Beach & Long Beach Area, 2 story Mint Penthouse Suite 2nd & 3rd levels with Water view Su

(516) 432-3492

53 Lido BlvdPoint Lookout, NY

(914) 921-5900

668 Milton RdRye, NY

(732) 842-0010

1099 Ocean AveSea Bright, NJ

(516) 239-5511

1875 Ocean BlvdAtlantic Beach, NY

(1)

This park is a great place to just wander around and enjoy the more than 20 acres of paths and lawns, many with descriptive signs along the way abou

(914) 967-0965

95 Dearborn AveRye, NY

(516) 571-7700

880 Lido BlvdLido Beach, NY

(516) 239-4491

1399 Beech StAtlantic Beach, NY

(732) 222-3300

1035 Ocean AveLong Branch, NJ

From Business:Located south of New York City, this beach is known for its sea kayak zone.

(732) 899-3306

416 New Jersey AvePoint Pleasant Beach, NJ

(203) 854-7806

50 Calf Pasture Beach RdNorwalk, CT

(732) 988-5533

1 Ocean AveOcean Grove, NJ

(732) 681-3700

400 Ocean AveBelmar, NJ

(631) 583-0196

937 Bay WalkOcean Beach, NY

(203) 256-3010

323 Fairfield Beach RdFairfield, CT

(513) 867-5348

880 S Benson RdFairfield, CT

(732) 899-2424

308 BoardwalkPoint Pleasant Beach, NJ

(732) 892-8412

704 Ocean AvePoint Pleasant Beach, NJ

(203) 576-7233

1 Barnum DykeBridgeport, CT

(732) 229-7025

221 Ocean Ave NLong Branch, NJ

(631) 269-0707

SUNKEN Meadow PkwyKings Park, NY

See the original post:
Beaches in Secaucus, New Jersey with Reviews & Ratings …

 Posted by at 5:41 pm  Tagged with:

Best Beaches in New Jersey – New Jersey Monthly

 Beaches  Comments Off on Best Beaches in New Jersey – New Jersey Monthly
Apr 092016
 

Best: Family Fun Beach Point Pleasant Beach Exit N-90/S-98 Fun House isnt just an attraction on the Point Pleasant Beach boardwalk; its an appropriate moniker for this seaside playground with its first-class aquarium, live entertainment, arcades, wide beaches and array of dining options. Rent bikes from the colorful fleet at Shore Riders Bike Rentals and cruise the boardwalk while the line winds down at Perks Caf, a popular breakfast spot featuring candied French toast and fresh fruit. Then hit the beach at Martells, where you can enjoy alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages from its Tiki Bar. Want to get the kids out of the sun? At Jenkinsons Aquarium, they can view sharks, penguins, alligators and sealseven sea stars and stingrays in the touch tank. For dinner, head over to Frankies Bar & Grill to feast on 10-ounce sirloin burgers. A $5.95 childrens menu offers six selections served with fries and a glass of milk or soda. End a great day at Hoffmans, where you can indulge in delicious homemade ice creamfrom strawberry bon bon to peanut butter nugget. AJC

Best: Family Quiet Beaches Stone Harbor Exit 10 With its small-town charm, laid-back shopping district and numerous restaurants, Stone Harbor offers fun for the whole familyat a slower pace than many of its Shore neighbors. The beaches are never overcrowded and are within walking distance of all points in the town (which for the most part is just two or three city blocks wide). Shoppers flock to 96th Street, but the town has plenty to keep the kids entertained as well. Peek through the windows at the Original Fudge Kitchen to see the sweet stuff being prepared; pop into Island Studio to paint your own pottery; or play a rooftop round of mini golf at one of Tee Times two locations. For fun on the water, you can rent a kayak or a surfboard from Harbor Outfitters for some flat-water paddling on the calm bay, or sign the family up for one of their guided ecotours. Satisfy the kids pizza cravings at Peace A Pizza, which serves offerings such as chicken parmesan and mac-n-cheese pizza. And cap it all off with a trip to Springers Homemade Ice Cream, a Stone Harbor staple since the 1920s. On summer Mondays, bring a blanket to the firehouse lot at 7 pm for family nights featuring magic shows, jugglers, puppets and songs.DAS

Recommended Reading: Girlfriend Getaways: Atlantic City

Bay Head Exit S-98/N-90 There are no public changing rooms in Bay Head, and food and beverages are prohibited on the beach. But the strand is never crowded, bathers are protected by lifeguards, and you can rent kayaks, surfboards and bikes right in town. For dinner, bring the family to Theresas South, a casual and creative offshoot of the popular Theresas in Westfield. Later, stop in for ice cream at Dorcas of Bay Head, a classic soda-fountain sidewalk caf. Dont miss the Summer Surf Movie Nights at the Beach House Classic Boardshop on select Fridays throughout the summer. DAS

Sea Girt Exit 98 With one mile of uncrowded beaches and an old-fashioned boardwalk, Sea Girt is perfect for a quiet family getaway. The boardwalk begins at the foot of the Sea Girt Lighthouse and runs to the south end of town. Hungry? Check out Rods Olde Irish Tavern, a turn-of-the-century saloon, for some traditional pub fare.DAS

Best: Secluded Beach Strathmere, Upper Township Exit N-13/S-17 Some folks in Upper Township are not happy with New Jersey Monthly. Why? Because in last years Shore Guide, we spilled the beans about their beloved gemStrathmere. (Seriously, they yelled at this reporter last summer.) Well, the secret is out, and yes, Strathmere is as unique as it sounds. Tucked between the busier Ocean City and Sea Isle City, this cozy 1.5-mile stretch is quiet, shoobie-free and requires no beach tags. Approach it from two-lane Commonwealth Avenue (where you can always find free street parking, even in the height of summer) and stake out a sandy spot for the day. Enjoy sunbathing at the shoreline, take a walk to the northern end of the island for views of OC, watch the dolphins commute, or try ocean kayaking, surfing, fishing, even kiteboardingall without kitschy shops and boardwalk hubbub. For a break from sun and sand, grab an ice cream at the Old Shack or a cold beer or two during happy hour at hole-in-the-wall Twisties or on the outdoor deck at the popular Deauville Inn. Just dont tell anyone you heard about it from me. The towns oval car decals even say Shhh. EMF

Excerpt from:
Best Beaches in New Jersey – New Jersey Monthly

 Posted by at 5:41 pm  Tagged with:

Beaches at Titusville, Florida | USA Today

 Beaches  Comments Off on Beaches at Titusville, Florida | USA Today
Apr 072016
 

Famed as it is for the NASA complex, Titusville also has some fabulous beaches. (Photo: Ablestock.com/AbleStock.com/Getty Images )

Titusville is a town on the east coast of central Florida. It attracts tourism primarily through its proximity to the NASA space complex and the nearby Canaveral National Seashore. The seashore covers 57,000 acres and stretches for 24 miles; it is the longest contiguous length of undeveloped beach on Florida’s east coast. Managed jointly with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge and owned by the Kennedy Space center, it is one of ten National Seashores protected by the National Park Service in the U.S.

One and a half million people visit the Seashore every year, so it is vital each one respect the environment. To protect the fragile dune structures, use only the boardwalks to pass from the parking areas to the beach. The beaches are on a barrier island separated by the intracoastal waterway — here Mosquito Lagoon on the Indian River — from the mainland. The Canaveral National Seashore is 12 miles east of Titusville; take Interstate 95 exit 80 or 84, then State Road 44 to 402, then follow SR 402 to its end. As of 2011, the south beaches are closed to the public three days prior to the launch of a space shuttle, and all day on launch days. Other rocket launches can also affect access. Apollo Beach, near the town of New Smyrna Beach, is part of the North District; Playalinda Beach is part of the South District. Parking Area 1 serves Apollo Beach; Parking Area 2 serves Playalinda Beach. There is a per-person day-use fee, but children under 16 are admitted free.

There are no concessions, showers or running water at the Seashore, and lifeguards are only on duty from May 30 to Sept. 1, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Only restrooms with chemical toilets are provided; everything else must be shipped in and shipped out again. Take sufficient water, sunscreen, insect repellent and a solution of 50-percent vinegar / 50-percent water in case a Portuguese man-of-war jellyfish is encountered. Leave only your footprints.

Playalinda is Spanish for “pretty beach.” Opening hours vary by season; contact the park service for current information. The beach is pristine, and seldom crowded. To ensure privacy, simply pick one of the many small parking lots with few or no cars, then use its dedicated boardwalk to access the beach. High tide leaves only a narrow strand in places, and ants are voracious near the dunes; taking a beach chair rather than a towel is highly recommended for sunbathing at high tide. Mosquitoes are also ubiquitous. Playalinda Beach is within Brevard County’s jurisdiction, so behavior is officially constrained by their nudity ordinance. However, the restriction is rarely and erratically enforced. The area of beach accessed from the final parking lot — “Beach 13” — is unofficially but universally accepted to be clothing optional.

Apollo Beach is in constant flux; each tide can deposit or remove as much as 10 feet of sand. The park service envisions Apollo Beach as having a much less dense population than Playalinda, even on the season’s busiest days; this is reflected in access problems. Parking is at only five coastal lots that, combined, can accommodate a maximum of 201 vehicles. There is one chemical toilet at each lot. The southernmost part of Apollo Beach is traditionally clothing-optional, accessed form parking lot 5 at the end of the road.

Rip currents, flowing seaward away from the beach, can be deadly. Rip currents are often an occurrence at the Seashore, where sandbars develop a short distance offshore causing water to rush outward through breaks in the underwater mounds. Storms are frequent, especially in the summer, and the Park Service advises that “Central Florida is the lightning capital of the world.” If lightning is observed, even apparently many miles offshore, take shelter in your car until the storm has passed. The Portuguese man-of-war can severely sting humans in the water and at the water’s edge. This huge drifting jellyfish extends feeding tentacles behind it, and these tentacles can be 50 feet long. Further, the body of the Portuguese man-of-war looks to children like a purple balloon, and even dead ones washed up on the sand can cause severe reactions. If stung, carefully remove any parts of the tentacle that remain on the skin, then treat the area with a 50 percent vinegar / 50 percent water mix and contact a park ranger for assistance. The parking lots are seldom monitored; leave valuables at home or locked securely in the safe at your accommodation.

The Seashore is a vital nesting habitat for loggerhead, leatherback and green sea turtles, predominantly between the months of May and August. Up to 4,000 loggerheads nest at the Seashore every year, but less than 300 greens and just a handful of leatherbacks do so. It is imperative not to disturb nesting sea turtles. During the nesting season, park rangers and skilled volunteers are on duty every night to screen new nests from predators. Do not disrupt any turtles that you see on shore, either by touching them or taking flash photographs; camera flashes can disorient their sense of direction as they climb up the beaches.

John Cagney Nash began composing press releases and event reviews for British nightclubs in 1982. His material was first published in the “Eastern Daily Press.” Nash’s work focuses on American life, travel and the music industry. In 1998 he earned an OxBridge doctorate in philosophy and immediately emigrated to America.

Continue reading here:
Beaches at Titusville, Florida | USA Today

Playalinda Beach – 57 Photos – Beaches – Titusville, FL …

 Beaches  Comments Off on Playalinda Beach – 57 Photos – Beaches – Titusville, FL …
Apr 072016
 

We came here on a holiday so of course it was packed. Living only a couple of miles from the beach, the only draw to this place was that parking lot 13 supposedly allowed nude sunbathing. Before we even arrived to lot 13 you could see already that the parking lot was going to be full, and all the other lots were already full.

People started parking on the side of the road in between 12 and 13 and security didn’t seem to mind since you have to pay $5 to get in and they were making so much money. We walked over through 12 and planned to go down to 13 to be able to partake in no tan lines, but to my surprise everyone was already in the flesh, so needless to say, everyone around was comfortable with it.

The only thing I would suggest is making sure to have at least one other person in your party if you don’t want to approached by strangers walking by, but if you have someone with you people tend to leave you alone. I would say it’s worth the money and the drive (30 minutes for us to get there and about 15 more once you get past the gate) but it’s great if you like quiet (no kids) and hate wearing a bathing suit.

See the rest here:
Playalinda Beach – 57 Photos – Beaches – Titusville, FL …

 Posted by at 8:41 pm  Tagged with:

Hidden Beach – Beaches – Minneapolis, MN – Reviews – Yelp

 Beaches  Comments Off on Hidden Beach – Beaches – Minneapolis, MN – Reviews – Yelp
Apr 062016
 

Oh, Hidden Beach. You are the exact opposite of hidden. Some people are nostalgically attached to you. I’m not one of them. Ima tell ’em what’s what, Hidden Beach, and you can’t stop me… ’cause you’re a beach.

I went for the first time last summer and… hmm…. the word that comes to mind is dirrrrrrty (X-tina-style=too dirty to clean its act up). The beach was ungodly crowded and I think I shaved about three years off my life by breathing the second-hand smoke hanging in the atmosphere like Hidden Beach’s own personal smoke monster.

I could see nary a square inch of sand, which turned out to be a blessing because under the beach towels were old cigarettes, broken glass bottles, used condoms (at least they’re being safe, right?) and rusty nails (YEP, I found an actual rusty nail). I don’t even want to know what has gone down in those mud pits over the years. Yelch.

The two stars are for (a) best. people-watching. ever. (saw some water-walkers on stand-up paddle boards, cute dogs, cute babies that should have been taken to a less rough-and-tumble beach, really good and really bad tattoos, etc.) and (b) for simply being a beach (gotta give it up for that, I’m not heartless).

Oh, I feel for you, Hidden Beach… you sorry has-been, I hope you aren’t too upset by my criticism. Either way, you’re a beach, so you can’t hurt me. Unless there’s something you’d like to tell me about that rusty nail…

Read more from the original source:
Hidden Beach – Beaches – Minneapolis, MN – Reviews – Yelp

Beaches Closest to Reading, Pennsylvania | USA Today

 Beaches  Comments Off on Beaches Closest to Reading, Pennsylvania | USA Today
Apr 032016
 

Skip to main content.

Caitlin Duke, Demand Media

Oceanfront beaches in New Jersey are only a day trip away from Reading. (Photo: Comstock Images/Stockbyte/Getty Images )

Thoughts of Reading, Pennsylvania, are not likely to conjure up images of sunbathing on a windswept beach while the waves lap the sand a few feet away. Though this city of 88,000 is not on the water, a number of lake and river beaches are within the state. If you’re looking for something grander, a smattering of large and small beaches are on the coast, just a few hours away.

The beach at Blue Marsh Lake in Leesport, Pennsylvania, may be small, but it is certainly convenient. Just a 20-minute drive northwest of Reading, this man-made lake covers a good deal of ground — 1,147 acres of water area, to be precise. The lake allows swimming, fishing, boating, water skiing and scuba diving during the summer months, while winter adventurers can enjoy ice boating, ice fishing and ice skating. The park surrounding the lake has over 36 miles of trails, open to pedestrians, equestrians and bicyclists.

Mt. Gretna Lake and Beach, in Pennsylvania, provides a premium beach experience without a lengthy drive. Under an hour due west of Reading, the facility rests on the banks of the stream-fed Lake Conewago. An admission fee is charged to access Mt. Gretna’s 300-square-foot beach and groves, but the facilities are well worth it. Mt. Gretna has lifeguards on duty in protected swimming areas, canoe and kayak rentals, two diving boards and a water swing.

Within a two-hour drive to the east and north of Reading, the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area in Pennsylvania boasts two grassy beaches open to the public. Both Milford Beach, near the town of Milford, and Smithfield Beach, near Delaware Water Gap, charge entrance fees for cars, bicyclists and pedestrians. Visitors enjoy boat and canoe launches and picnic areas, and access is available to the Joseph M. McDade Recreational Trail for avid hikers.

Seven Presidents Oceanfront Park at Monmouth Beach, New Jersey, is just a couple of hours away, directly to the east of Reading on the New Jersey coast. The 38-acre park is open year-round, with parking and entrance fees during the summer months. Enjoy a round of beach volleyball on the court or venture into open water on a kayak or canoe. Lifeguards are on duty in protected areas of the beach, which is also open to surfers.

A graduate of Oberlin College, Caitlin Duke has written on travel and relationships for Time.com. She has crisscrossed the country several times, and relishes discovering new points on the map. As a credentialed teacher, she also has a strong background in issues facing families today.

Thank you for providing feedback to our Editorial staff on this article. Please fill in the following information so we can alert the Travel Tips editorial team about a factual or typographical error in this story. All Fields are required.

Read more from the original source:
Beaches Closest to Reading, Pennsylvania | USA Today

 Posted by at 6:42 am  Tagged with:

Lake Beaches in Eastern Pennsylvania | USA Today

 Beaches  Comments Off on Lake Beaches in Eastern Pennsylvania | USA Today
Apr 032016
 

Skip to main content.

Michelle Hornaday, Demand Media

Swim at a designated lake beach in Pennsylvania. (Photo: Thinkstock/Comstock/Getty Images )

Visit one of 117 state parks or 2.1 million acres of forest land managed by the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (dcnr.state.pa.us) for a day of recreation. County and city parks also offer Pennsylvania residents and visitors a place to bike, hike, walk or swim. In the eastern half of the state, several destinations invite visitors to wade in the water from a beach bordering lakes ranging in size from 1.7-acre Fuller Lake to 1,147-acre Blue Marsh Lake.

Located 21 miles south of the New York border and 52 miles north of Williamsport, 407-acre Hills Creek State Park (dcnr.state.pa.us) has a sandy beach bordering 137-acre Hills Creek Lake. A grassy area also welcomes visitors near the lake’s shore, and boats may be launched to spend the day fishing for bass, carp or catfish. At 2,158-acre Little Pine State Park, wade in the water from a sand beach with grass turf to swim in the 94-acre Little Pine Lake. Pack a picnic lunch to refuel at one of four designated areas after a day of swimming or explore more than 14 miles of hiking trails through the park.

Located near Leesport, Blue Marsh Lake (nap.usace.army.mil) spans 1,147 acres of water surface and has a designated swimming beach area. Launch a boat or spend time hiking on 36 miles of trails after time spent swimming on the lake. The privately owned Mt. Gretna Lake and Beach (mtgretnalake.com) is 46 miles west of Blue Marsh Lake near Lebanon and features 300 feet of sandy beaches adjacent to a roped swimming area as well as a diving board and water swing. A daily admission fee applies at Mt. Gretna Lake; beach chair rentals, changing areas and picnic tables are available to visitors.

Spend the day on one of 150 lakes in the Pocono Mountains (800poconos.com) region in northeastern Pennsylvania. Access Beltzville Lake from a 525-foot beach at 3,002-acre Beltzville State Park (dcnr.state.pa.us) during the summer months. Located 23 miles south of Scranton, Gouldsboro and Tobyhanna state parks also have sandy beaches open to visitors on 250-acre Gouldsboro Lake and 170-acre Tobyhanna Lake. Head to the beach at Mauch Chunk Lake Park (carboncounty.com) in Carbon County to swim in a designated area under a lifeguard’s supervision and near a family picnic area. More than 150,000 visitors annually head the to sandy beaches at Mauch Chunk Lake annually to swim, boat, fish or hike.

At 696-acre Pine Grove Furnace State Park (dcnr.state.pa.us), swim from sandy beaches at both 25-acre Laurel Lake and 1.7-acre Fuller Lake. Snack bars are open during the summer at both beaches; boating is permitted on Laurel Lake. A 3.5-acre lake swimming beach is also available at 273-acre Colonel Deming State Park, located near Landisburg and Newville. Claim a spot on the sandy beaches of 2,338-acre Gifford Pinchot State Park bordering 340-acre Pinchot Lake. Boat rentals, a children’s playground and picnic areas are adjacent to the beach. Overnight campsites are available for those planning a multiday stay.

Michelle Hornaday lives in Edmonds, Washington and holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from Washington State University and a Master of Education from Northern Arizona University. She is currently a freelance writer for various websites.

Thank you for providing feedback to our Editorial staff on this article. Please fill in the following information so we can alert the Travel Tips editorial team about a factual or typographical error in this story. All Fields are required.

Read more:
Lake Beaches in Eastern Pennsylvania | USA Today

Saltwater Ocean Beaches – Mass.Gov

 Beaches  Comments Off on Saltwater Ocean Beaches – Mass.Gov
Apr 012016
 

Most DCR swimming beaches are open to the public between Memorial Day and Labor Day. During that time DCR offers access to parking, restroom facilities and regular water quality testing. Many DCR beaches also offer lifeguard services. After Labor Day and before Memorial Day, DCR does not conduct regular water quality testing or guarantee other beach services

DCR allows the use of ONLY U.S. Coast Guard approved flotation devices at it’s public swimming ocean, inland beaches and pools. The tag inside the flotation device must say U.S. Coast Guard approved. The user of the approved flotation device must be accompanied by a capable swimmer. Inflatable devices are not allowed.

Although U.S. Coast Guard approved flotation devices are allowed, DCR asks that parents or guardians always keep a close watch on their children when in any amount of water. In certain conditions such as strong currents flotation devices may not be allowed by the Lifeguard staff. If you have any questions please check with the Lifeguard on duty.

Inflatable Swimmies are not US Coast Guard approved and therefore not allowed. Thank you for your cooperation.

See the original post here:
Saltwater Ocean Beaches – Mass.Gov

Long Beach, Mississippi – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 Beaches  Comments Off on Long Beach, Mississippi – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Mar 232016
 

GeographyEdit

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 10.4 square miles (26.9km2), of which 10.0 square miles (25.9km2) is land and 0.39 square miles (1.0km2), or 3.74% is water.[2]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 17,320 people, 6,560 households, and 4,696 families residing in the city. The population density is 1,713.6 people per square mile (661.5/km). There were 7,203 housing units at an average density of 712.6 per square mile (275.1/km). The racial makeup of the city was 87.49% White, 7.36% African American, 0.39% Native American, 2.57% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 0.68% from other races, and 1.44% from two or more races. 2.29% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 6,560 households out of which 36.2% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.8% were married couples living together, 13.5% have a female householder with no husband present, and 28.4% were non-families. 22.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.7% had someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size is 3.07.

In the city the population dispersal was 27.1% under the age of 18, 9.1% from 18 to 24, 29.8% from 25 to 44, 22.8% from 45 to 64, and 11.2% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 93.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.7 males. The median income for a household in the city was $43,289, and the median income for a family was $50,014. Males had a median income of $35,909 versus $24,119 for females. The per capita income for the city was $19,305. 9.0% of the population and 7.7% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 15.2% of those under the age of 18 and 3.7% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line.

The city of Long Beach is served by the Long Beach School District. The district operates five campuses and has an enrollment of approximately 2,700 students. These campuses include Long Beach High School, Long Beach Middle School, Reeves Elementary School, Quarles Elementary School, and Harper McCaughan Elementary School, rebuilt in a new location after the previous school was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina.

Long Beach High has a long-standing tradition of excellence. It offers rigorous academics including college preparatory classes, advanced placement classes and award winning vocational classes. In 2007 Long Beach High School was named a National Blue Ribbon School by the U.S. Department of Education, making it one of four schools in Mississippi and one of about 273 private and public schools in the United States to receive this honor.

The Gulf Coast campus of the University of Southern Mississippi is located in Long Beach along Beach Boulevard. The Friendship Oak tree is located on the front lawn of the Southern Miss Gulf Park campus.

Long Beach began as an agricultural town, based around its radish industry. But on August 10, 1905, Long Beach incorporated and became another city on the Mississippi Gulf Coast. As the years went on, the city moved from its agricultural heritage and moved toward tourism with the beach and high-rise condominiums becoming increasingly popular.

Long Beach’s early economy was based largely upon radishes. Logging initially drove the local economy, but when the area’s virgin yellow pine forests became depleted, row crops were planted on the newly cleared land.[6]

A productive truck farming town in the early 20th century, citizens of Long Beach proclaimed the city to be the “Radish Capital of the World”. The city was especially known for its cultivation of the Long Red radish variety, a favorite beer hall staple in the northern US at the time. In 1921, a bumper crop resulted in the shipment of over 300 train loads of Long Beach’s Long Red radishes to northern states.[7][8]

Eventually, the Long Red radishes for which Long Beach was known fell into disfavor, and the rise of the common button radish caused a dramatic decline in the cultivation of this crop in the area.[6]

Nineteen days following the city’s centennial, Hurricane Katrina struck the city on August 29, 2005, destroying almost all buildings within 500m of the Gulf of Mexico shoreline. Many Long Beach residents were left homeless or living in water and or wind damaged houses.[9]

The city of Long Beach, California, held a fund raiser to help its eponymous relative.[10] The city of Peoria, Arizona, adopted Long Beach and provided both public and private resources. This resulted in a close relationship between the two communities.[citation needed]

Today, the city is still recovering from Hurricane Katrina. Residents are returning as beaches and condominiums in the area are being repaired. However, the city has not seen a return of business to pre-Katrina levels due in part to building codes on the beach established by Federal Emergency Management Agency and Mississippi Emergency Management Agency and to the economic downturn.

Go here to see the original:
Long Beach, Mississippi – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Famous Beaches in Virginia | USA Today

 Beaches  Comments Off on Famous Beaches in Virginia | USA Today
Mar 162016
 

Related Articles

Virginia has over 3,300 miles of shoreline, including 112 miles of coasts. Its not surprising to find that the state also has several famous beaches that draw millions of tourists each year for swimming, fishing, boating, seashell collecting, bird watching, clamming and nature trails.

Assateague Island straddles two states, Maryland and Virginia, and was established in 1962 as the Assateague Island National Seashore to protect its natural environment as a vital resting and migratory spot for various bird species. All the 37 miles of dunes, wildlife and wetlands are protected, and therefore, there are no signs of commercial or residential development. Assateague is best known for the wild ponies that wander the pristine beaches, as well as the Assateague Lighthouse, which is open to public visitors. Toms Cove Visitor Center 8586 Beach Road Chincoteague Island, VA 23336 757-336-6577 nps.gov/asis

Chincoteague is home to the Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge, listed as one of the top five U.S. shorebird migratory staging areas. Chincoteague is Virginias only resort island, and is world famous for oyster beds and clam shoals. Its also the gateway to Assateague, and the wild ponies there are herded to swim across the channel to Chincoteague Island each July for auction, a popular public event. In addition to the usual swimming, sun bathing and water sports, the Park Service and Wildlife Refuge both offer guided wildlife tours and exhibits throughout the year. Chincoteague Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Center 6733 Maddox Blvd. Chincoteague Island, VA 23336 757-336-6161 chincoteague.com

Colonial Beach is at the tip of the Northern Neck region, one of the few remaining small seaport towns on the Potomac River. It has sandy beaches and marinas on Monroe Bay ideal for swimming, boating and sailing. The area is also quite historic, containing George Washington’s birthplace; Stratford Hall, the boyhood home of Robert E. Lee; and neighboring Westmoreland County, the birthplace of James Monroe. Colonial Beach has been designated as one of the few Golf Cart Towns, where golf carts may be operated by licensed drivers on city streets, but the Town Trolley also makes sightseeing stops. Colonial Beach Chamber of Commerce 6 N Irving Ave. Colonial Beach, VA 22443 804-224-8145 info@colonialbeach.org colonialbeach.org

At the northern end of Norfolk on the Chesapeake Bay lies Ocean View Beach, with 7.5 miles of beaches, commercial piers, bait shops, rental paddle boats, Jet Skis and sailboats, and a park with a bathhouse and picnic tables. The Ocean View Beach Festival is held every summer with live music, dancing and family activities right on the beach. The boardwalk is a good spot for a stroll and occasional sightings of submarines from nearby Norfolk Naval Air Station. Ocean View Beach Park 100 W. Ocean View Ave. Norfolk, VA 757-441-1776 oceanviewscene.com

Virginia Beach is the states most famous beach and the third largest in the United States, with 35 miles of waterfront property. Chesapeake Bay Beach and Sandbridge are two distinct beaches within the city borders that are more tranquil and secluded. For those who want excitement, theres the Resort Beaches area, which include the 3-mile oceanfront boardwalk, with bikes and roller blades for rent, restaurants, shops and various festivals during the summer. There are plenty of options for additional entertainment, including 4,000 acres in parks and national refuges, the Virginia Aquarium & Marine Science Center and the Virginia Beach Oceanfront Waterpark. Virginia Beach Visitors Center 2100 Parks Ave. Virginia Beach, VA 23451 800-VA-BEACH (800-822-3224) vabvc@vbgov.com vbfun.com

Bonnie Singleton has been writing professionally since 1996. She has written for various newspapers and magazines including “The Washington Times” and “Woman’s World.” She also wrote for the BBC-TV news magazine “From Washington” and worked for Discovery Channel online for more than a decade. Singleton holds a master’s degree in musicology from Florida State University and is a member of the American Independent Writers.

View post:
Famous Beaches in Virginia | USA Today

 Posted by at 4:41 am  Tagged with:



Pierre Teilhard De Chardin | Designer Children | Prometheism | Euvolution | Transhumanism